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Pronouns: Debunking Popular Myths: Intro

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Re: Pronouns: Debunking Popular Myths: Intro  [#permalink]

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New post 31 May 2017, 14:02
karenning2926 wrote:
Hi egmat,

I understand the explanation above in which a pronoun confusion exists. Could you answer a question for me though? Can the pronoun "it" be used if the antecedent appears after the pronoun -- referring to "Flexi Mixie Screen" as a possible pronoun.




Hello karenning2926,


Thank you for the query. :-)

Yes, a pronoun may appear in a sentence before its noun antecedent. Take a look at the following simple correct sentences:


Although he is super rich, Jack has no pride at all.

Although it is very beautiful, the new mall does not have many shops.



Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: Pronouns: Debunking Popular Myths: Intro  [#permalink]

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New post 31 May 2017, 14:16
ayan5409 wrote:
Hi egmat,

Although swimming can cause cramps in a swimmer's legs or feet, they can usually be avoided if the swimmer avoids overexertion and performs stretching exercises before entering the pool.

Although swimming can cause cramps in a swimmer's legs or feet, they
Cramps in a swimmer's legs or feet caused by swimming
Swimming can cause cramps in a swimmer's legs or feet, which
The fact that swimming can cause cramps in a swimmer's legs or feet
Swimming can cause cramps in a swimmer's legs or feet, although they

In this sentence, 'they' can refer to only one logical antecedent 'cramps' since legs or feet will not make sense. So shouldn't the answer be A instead of B?

Please explain :)




Hello ayan5409,


Thank you for the query. :-)


You are correct in saying that in the above mentioned sentence, they can only refer to cramps logically.

However, the structure of the sentence is such the parallelism between the two clauses should be maintained. Hence, the original sentence is not correct as the subject of the first clause is swimming and the the subject of the second clause is they that refers to cramps.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: Pronouns: Debunking Popular Myths: Intro  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Dec 2017, 00:03
As per earlier posts about "Myth 1 : A Pronoun can refer to only nearest nount", below sentence dont have any ambiguity. Here "it" and "its: refer to "manfacturerer" only.
Because an oversupply of computer chips has sent prices plunging, the manufacturer has announced that it will cut production by closing its factories for two days a month.

But if we place "computer chips" in place of "its" then that also make sence and it leads to ambiguity for second pronoun usage.

Will someone pls clarify about this.
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New post 28 Dec 2017, 02:04
abhik1502 wrote:
As per earlier posts about "Myth 1 : A Pronoun can refer to only nearest nount", below sentence dont have any ambiguity. Here "it" and "its: refer to "manfacturerer" only.
Because an oversupply of computer chips has sent prices plunging, the manufacturer has announced that it will cut production by closing its factories for two days a month.

But if we place "computer chips" in place of "its" then that also make sence and it leads to ambiguity for second pronoun usage.

Will someone pls clarify about this.



Hello abhik1502,

I will be glad to help you with this one. :-)

Please note that computer chips is a plural noun entity. There is no way we can replace the singular pronoun its with plural noun computer chips in this official sentence as doing so will lead to pronoun-antecedent number agreement error.

The singular form of computer chips is computer chip.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: Pronouns: Debunking Popular Myths: Intro  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Dec 2017, 23:59
Thanks a lot Shraddha for answering my earlier query !

I had one more. Below sentence is from Myth4

Official Sentence 2: As its sales of computer products have surpassed those of measuring instruments, the company has become increasingly willing to compete for the mass market sales it would in the past have conceded to rivals. (OG12 #07)

Out there as per intended meaning pronoun "its" refers to company. But why can it refer to market also. Market is also singular noun out here and make sense also.
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Pronouns: Debunking Popular Myths: Intro  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Dec 2017, 14:26
abhik1502 wrote:
Thanks a lot Shraddha for answering my earlier query !

I had one more. Below sentence is from Myth4

Official Sentence 2: As its sales of computer products have surpassed those of measuring instruments, the company has become increasingly willing to compete for the mass market sales it would in the past have conceded to rivals. (OG12 #07)

Out there as per intended meaning pronoun "its" refers to company. But why can it refer to market also. Market is also singular noun out here and make sense also.




Hello abhik1502,

Thank you for the query. :-)

Presence of multiple nouns having the same number as the pronoun does not lead to pronoun ambiguity.

Pronoun ambiguity error happens when more than two nouns makes logical sense as the antecedent of one pronoun.

Now let's talk about the pronoun reference in the official sentence that you have mentioned in your post.

The sentence Presents cause-and-effect.

Cause - Sales of computer products have surpassed the sales of measuring instruments.
Effect - The company is ready to compete with its rivals for mass market sales. This will to compete is something that this company would have conceded to its rival.

So the company has decided to compete because its sales have gone up and not the market's sales. So logically, its refer to company only.

Grammatically, its cannot refer to market because pronouns can reefer to only nouns. But in this sentence the word market has been used as an adjective. The phrase mass market presents more information about sales.

Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: Pronouns: Debunking Popular Myths: Intro  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Feb 2018, 11:41
"The King of Greece has a son, people are afraid of him."
Can "him" refer to both "the king" and "white tiger"?
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Pronouns: Debunking Popular Myths: Intro  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Feb 2018, 17:30
somasarkar123

Welcome to GmatClub!

We need the noun to which the pronoun refers to be present in
the sentence.

In your sentence, him is ambiguous since it can refer both
son and King.

Also the sentence structure is incorrect since we need FANBOYS to
connect two independent sentences.

Hope this helps.
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Re: Pronouns: Debunking Popular Myths: Intro  [#permalink]

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New post 29 May 2018, 09:20
Hi, I have a quick question regarding pronouns.

Was reading through MGMAT SC and one of the examples used to explain 'those, that, this, these" was:
The money spent by her parents is less than THAT spent by her children.

Which lead me to thinking, which of the following sentence structures is more grammatically correct, and why?
1) The money spent by her is less than that spent by her children
2) The money she spent is less than that spent by her children

(1) follows the parallel structure but sounds extremely awkward to me.

Thanks!
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Re: Pronouns: Debunking Popular Myths: Intro  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Aug 2018, 08:47
santy wrote:
Hi eGmat,
Thanks for the pronoun myth buster article. +1 kudos!

I've a doubt about 'white tiger' excercise question.

egmat wrote:

iv. The White Tiger is nicknamed “the Lightning” because it moves very quickly.

The pronoun “it” is ambiguous in its usage. It is not clear if “it” refers to “White Tiger” or “Lightning”. Observe that both the following sentences make perfect sense.

a. The White Tiger is nicknamed “the Lightning” because the white tiger moves very quickly.
b. The White Tiger is nicknamed “the Lightning” because lightning moves very quickly.


So there is a pronoun usage error in this sentence.



The White Tiger is nicknamed “the Lightning” because it moves very quickly.

I thought this sentence is unambiguous because 'white tiger' is the only logical antecedent of 'it'.

As sentence clearly mentions, 'the lightning' is a nickname given to white tiger.
So how can a nickname be a possible antecedent of the pronoun 'it'?

You mentioned that the sentence - 'the lightning' moves quickly - is fine. But it is not the actual lightning, but rather a nickname. How can a nickname move quickly?

I searched through GMATPrep SC document to find similar sentences, but didn't find any.
I would appreciate if you could clarify the doubt and share some official sentences in which a pronoun is refering to the meaning of a nickname rather than to the nickname itself.

- Santy.


Hi,

I would appreciate if anybody could explain why the pronoun is ambiguous. As Santy pointed out, the nickname cannot move quickly. On the other hand, we know what " The Lightning" is - the tiger - so, having that in mind, it makes clear that both inputs refer to the tiger. What's wrong with this reasoning?

Thanks
Re: Pronouns: Debunking Popular Myths: Intro &nbs [#permalink] 19 Aug 2018, 08:47

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