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The CEO of Laminar Flow gave his R & D team a new $300 million dollar

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The CEO of Laminar Flow gave his R & D team a new $300 million dollar  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Mar 2014, 09:55
14
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A
B
C
D
E

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  95% (hard)

Question Stats:

35% (01:07) correct 65% (01:11) wrong based on 1578 sessions

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The CEO of Laminar Flow gave his R & D team a new $300 million dollar research facility, with cutting-edge technology, that they can research potentially revolutionary innovations in.

(A) that they can research potentially revolutionary innovations in
(B) for conducting research about revolutionarily potential innovations
(C) that can be the place for them to research potentially revolutionary innovations
(D) where it would be conducting research into revolutionary potential innovations
(E) in which to conduct research into potentially revolutionary innovations


For a discussion of the Infinitive of Purpose, as well as the OE to this particular question, see:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2014/the-infini ... orrection/

Mike :-)

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Re: The CEO of Laminar Flow gave his R & D team a new $300 million dollar  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Feb 2015, 11:20
2
4
VerbalHow wrote:
Hi Mike, why is B wrong? It says:
(B) for conducting research about revolutionarily potential innovations

Is it because "revolutionarily" modifies "potential" here, while in the original sentence, "revolutionary" should be modifying "innovations". In that sense, B changes the meaning of the original sentence. Is my interpretation correct?

Dear VerbalHow,
Yes, the meaning is very different.
1) a potentially revolutionary product --- this implies that we have the product already, and we believe that this real existing product has the potential to start some kind of revolution. What is revolutionary, at least possibly, is the impact of the product. That's the original meaning in the sentence.
2) a revolutionarily potential product --- this would be a product that doesn't really exist---it only exists as an idea, in potential, but somehow, its potential to come into existence is revolutionarily different from the potential of other hypothetical products to come into existence. What is revolutionary is the ability of the product to move from hypothetical to real. That's bizarre. That really makes no sense.
Does this distinction make sense?
Satyarath wrote:
Thanks for the review Mike.
Can you please elaborate the correct usage of "in which"?

Dear Satyarath,
Hmm. What you are asking is difficult, because in a sense, you are asking me to explain volumes and volumes of grammar. First of all, I will say: if you want a thorough introduction to grammar, then join Magoosh and watch our SC Lesson videos.

The word "which" is a relative pronoun. It always
(1) refers to a noun, an antecedent, as any pronoun does
(2) starts a subordinate clause, a particular kind known as a relative clause

Within the relatively clause, the pronoun "which" may be the subject or direct object or object of a preposition.
I learned about yoga, which changed my life. = "which" as subject
I just read a good book, which my doctor recommended. = "which" as direct object
Here is a book for which I wrote the preface. = "which" as object of preposition "for"
Here is a book in which the author criticizes his own writing style.. = "which" as object of preposition "in"
One way to think about these last cases: imagine we changed each long sentence into two smaller sentences.
Here is a book. I wrote the preface for it.
Here is a book. In it, the author criticizes his own writing style.

Those are choppier, not as smooth as the longer analogs. Notice, though: whatever role the pronoun "it" has in the second shorter sentence is the role of the pronoun "which" in the longer sentence.

That's a very brief overview. The problem is: to explain this thoroughly, I would have to explain all of grammar. Again, I would suggest the Magoosh lesson videos for a thorough overview. I would also recommend this blog article:
https://magoosh.com/gmat/2014/how-to-im ... bal-score/

You may also find this article illuminating:
https://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/that-vs-w ... -the-gmat/

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: The CEO of Laminar Flow gave his R & D team a new $300 million dollar  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Mar 2014, 21:00
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IMO E.

The CEO of Laminar Flow gave his R & D team a new $300 million dollar research facility, with cutting-edge technology, that they can research potentially revolutionary innovations in.
(A) that they can research potentially revolutionary innovations in -- "they"
(B) for conducting research about revolutionarily potential innovations - "for" we need " facility to"
(C) that can be the place for them to research potentially revolutionary innovations - "them"
(D) where it would be conducting research into revolutionary potential innovations - "it" is ambiguous
(E) in which to conduct research into potentially revolutionary innovations - correct ..
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Re: The CEO of Laminar Flow gave his R & D team a new $300 million dollar  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Mar 2014, 22:48
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Very good question, Mike.

This sentence represents a issue with the usage of "that" as well, I think. Correct me if I am wrong.
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New post 20 Mar 2014, 09:25
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coolredwine wrote:
Very good question, Mike.

This sentence represents a issue with the usage of "that" as well, I think. Correct me if I am wrong.

Dear coolredwine,
Thank you. Yes, the use of "that" vs. "which" is one of the issues brewing in this question, but there's also the issue of the Infinitive of Purpose as well as the logic of the adjective/adverbs ("potentially revolutionary" vs. "revolutionarily potential"). The SC questions on the GMAT typically have a few different issues brewing at a few different levels of analysis, so I try to model that in the questions I write.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: The CEO of Laminar Flow gave his R & D team a new $300 million dollar  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Feb 2015, 08:37
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Hi Mike, why is B wrong? It says:

(B) for conducting research about revolutionarily potential innovations

Is it because "revolutionarily" modifies "potential" here, while in the original sentence, "revolutionary" should be modifying "innovations". In that sense, B changes the meaning of the original sentence. Is my interpretation correct?
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Re: The CEO of Laminar Flow gave his R & D team a new $300 million dollar  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Feb 2015, 09:11
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Beside other issues with B , "research about" is not idiomatic , "research into " is correct idiom.

Thanks

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Re: The CEO of Laminar Flow gave his R & D team a new $300 million dollar  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Feb 2015, 11:57
Dear mikemcgarry

coolredwine wrote:
Very good question, Mike.

This sentence represents a issue with the usage of "that" as well, I think. Correct me if I am wrong.

Dear coolredwine,
Thank you. Yes, the use of "that" vs. "which" is one of the issues brewing in this question, but there's also the issue of the Infinitive of Purpose as well as the logic of the adjective/adverbs ("potentially revolutionary" vs. "revolutionarily potential"). The SC questions on the GMAT typically have a few different issues brewing at a few different levels of analysis, so I try to model that in the questions I write.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Can you please elaborate Adjective/Adverbs part because this question shaken my concepts that adverb modifies verbs and adjective modifies noun that is what i have learnt.

Hope i am not missing something, if yes please mention

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Re: The CEO of Laminar Flow gave his R & D team a new $300 million dollar  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Feb 2015, 12:30
Hi Mike

I was browsing through all your articles. Found part of my answer in the last line of this article.

https://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/gmat-sent ... use-where/

Thanks a tonne :)
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Re: The CEO of Laminar Flow gave his R & D team a new $300 million dollar  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Feb 2015, 23:19
The CEO of Laminar Flow gave his R & D team a new $300 million dollar research facility, with cutting-edge technology, that they can research potentially revolutionary innovations in.

(A) that they can research potentially revolutionary innovations in ->Team cannot be referred by they. In ? what?
(B) for conducting research about revolutionarily potential innovations -> "For conducting" doesn't show intent. "to conduct" is better usage. Innovations is a noun, we require a adjective to modify a noun. Potential is a noun and not a adjective

(C) that can be the place for them to research potentially revolutionary innovations -> Them cannot refer to a team
(D) where it would be conducting research into revolutionary potential innovations -> Same issue as Option B)
(E) in which to conduct research into potentially revolutionary innovations -> Correct
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New post 19 Feb 2015, 23:33
kinjiGC

Can you explain me this construction highlighted below:

My take is that adverb potentially must modify verb not another adverb


(E) in which to conduct research into potentially revolutionary innovations -> Correct

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New post 19 Feb 2015, 23:38
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smartyguy wrote:
kinjiGC

Can you explain me this construction highlighted below:

My take is that adverb potentially must modify verb not another adverb


(E) in which to conduct research into potentially revolutionary innovations -> Correct

Regards
SG


innovations -> Noun
revolutionary -> Adjective
potentially -> adverb

Adverbs can modify another adverb, adjective or verb
Adjectives can modify noun

I hope it is clear.
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Re: The CEO of Laminar Flow gave his R & D team a new $300 million dollar  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jun 2015, 03:47
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The CEO of Laminar Flow gave his R & D team a new $300 million dollar research facility, with cutting-edge technology, that they can research potentially revolutionary innovations in.

Remove the modifier(highlighted in bold) and read the choices,E stands out as the answer.

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Re: The CEO of Laminar Flow gave his R & D team a new $300 million dollar  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Nov 2015, 07:39
The CEO of Laminar Flow gave his R & D team a new $300 million dollar research facility, with cutting-edge technology, that they can research potentially revolutionary innovations in.

let's understand the meaning:
CEO gave his R&D Team a research facility
This facility is with cutting-edge technology
this facility can be used to conduct research into potentially revolutionary innovations.


(A) that they can research potentially revolutionary innovations in
remove "with cutting...", and you'll see why A is not correct. Research facility that they can research.. This is somehow awkward. I believe to make this option choice correct, that should be replaced with where. Moreover, "they" doesn't have an antecedent.

(B) for conducting research about revolutionarily potential innovations
research about revolutionarily potential innovations. No. This changes the meaning of the sentence.

(C) that can be the place for them to research potentially revolutionary innovations
"them" doesn't have an antecedent. It refers to the team, but the team is Singular. Moreover, it is wordy.

(D) where it would be conducting research into revolutionary potential innovations
revolutionary potential innovations - changes meaning. "would be" again changes meaning. We are certain that the team will conduct researches.

(E) in which to conduct research into potentially revolutionary innovations
looks good. In which technically refers to the facility. Facility in which to conduct research - sounds way better than original sentence.

E for me.
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Re: The CEO of Laminar Flow gave his R & D team a new $300 million dollar  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Mar 2017, 04:44
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mikemcgarry wrote:
The CEO of Laminar Flow gave his R & D team a new $300 million dollar research facility, with cutting-edge technology, that they can research potentially revolutionary innovations in.
(B) for conducting research about revolutionarily potential innovations
(E) in which to conduct research into potentially revolutionary innovations



Hello Sir, mikemcgarry
I understand the concept of adverb of purpose here and reason why E is preferred over B ( based on the first split - "to conduct" vs "for conducting").
Quote:
FOR + VERBing and FOR + NOUN typically serve to tell us WHY.
The governor has been criticized FOR RAISING TAXES.
The judge has been praised FOR HIS DECISION.
In the first sentence, raising taxes is WHY the governor has been criticized.
In the second sentence, the judge's decision is WHY the judge has been praised.

So, I understand that the very reasoning can be applied in B too.

Quote:
in general, the modifier “to + verb” is used to signal the goal or purpose of an action/statement, while “for + verbing” conveys the idea that the action is, in some generic way, oriented toward the process of “verbing”.
in many instances, therefore, both constructions are fine. for instance:
i need to get a new pair of shoes to run --> this sentence implies that “to run” is the ultimate goal (which, presumably, hasn't yet been achieved). in other words, according to this wording, i can't run until i get a new pair of shoes; therefore, “to run” is the ultimate goal or purpose of getting a new pair of shoes.
i need to get a new pair of shoes for running --> this sentence just means that i need to get a new pair of running shoes (= shoes whose purpose is oriented toward the general process of running). this sentence is different, in the sense that it doesn't portray the act of running some sort of remote goal or purpose that hasn't yet been achieved; it merely identifies the reason why i'm getting the shoes. .

Considering this specific concept,"for conduction" and "to conduct" can both work here. Hence, "in which to conduct" vs "for conducting" becomes a false split. So, the other split - " revolutionary potential innovations" vs "potentially revolutionary innovations"- seems perfect one to go for E.

Moreover, if I get this problem in actual GMAT, and, considering that there will always be more than one split, I will surely rely on the second split.

Thank you :-D
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Re: The CEO of Laminar Flow gave his R & D team a new $300 million dollar  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jul 2017, 14:53
Although I clearly eliminated choices, A,B,C and D, the following sentence (choice E) looks incomplete to me.

The CEO of Laminar Flow gave his R & D team a new $300 million dollar research facility, with cutting-edge technology, in which to conduct research into potentially revolutionary innovations.

This sentence looks in fact looks fragmented to me.

mikemcgarry can you please help. Thanks in advance!
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Re: The CEO of Laminar Flow gave his R & D team a new $300 million dollar  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jul 2017, 18:07
mohit2491 wrote:
Although I clearly eliminated choices, A,B,C and D, the following sentence (choice E) looks incomplete to me.

The CEO of Laminar Flow gave his R & D team a new $300 million dollar research facility, with cutting-edge technology, in which to conduct research into potentially revolutionary innovations.

This sentence looks in fact looks fragmented to me.

mikemcgarry can you please help. Thanks in advance!

Dear mohit2491,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

This sentence is 100% grammatically correct. It is somewhat sophisticated in its structure, admittedly, so that many less educated native English speakers would be puzzled by it.

The word "which" is a relative pronoun. The role of a relative pronoun is to introduce a relative clause, which is a kind of noun-modifying clause. The relative pronoun takes some noun-role in the sentence: sometimes it is the subject, sometimes it is the object, and sometimes it is the object of a preposition.

I met a man who spoke with my friend. (Relative pronoun "who" is the subject of the relative clause)
I met a man whom my friend hates. (Relative pronoun "whom" is the direct object of the verb inside the clause)
I met a man for whom all my friends have an intense dislike. (Relative pronoun "whom" is the object of of a prepositional phrase inside the clause)

In this last case, the case in which the relative pronoun is the object of a preposition, the correct structure is:
[preposition][relative pronoun][N & V center of the relative clause]

Does this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: The CEO of Laminar Flow gave his R & D team a new $300 million dollar  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jul 2017, 19:44
mikemcgarry wrote:
VerbalHow wrote:
Hi Mike, why is B wrong? It says:
(B) for conducting research about revolutionarily potential innovations

Is it because "revolutionarily" modifies "potential" here, while in the original sentence, "revolutionary" should be modifying "innovations". In that sense, B changes the meaning of the original sentence. Is my interpretation correct?

Dear VerbalHow,
Yes, the meaning is very different.
1) a potentially revolutionary product --- this implies that we have the product already, and we believe that this real existing product has the potential to start some kind of revolution. What is revolutionary, at least possibly, is the impact of the product. That's the original meaning in the sentence.
2) a revolutionarily potential product --- this would be a product that doesn't really exist---it only exists as an idea, in potential, but somehow, its potential to come into existence is revolutionarily different from the potential of other hypothetical products to come into existence. What is revolutionary is the ability of the product to move from hypothetical to real. That's bizarre. That really makes no sense.
Does this distinction make sense?
Satyarath wrote:
Thanks for the review Mike.
Can you please elaborate the correct usage of "in which"?

Dear Satyarath,
Hmm. What you are asking is difficult, because in a sense, you are asking me to explain volumes and volumes of grammar. First of all, I will say: if you want a thorough introduction to grammar, then join Magoosh and watch our SC Lesson videos.

The word "which" is a relative pronoun. It always
(1) refers to a noun, an antecedent, as any pronoun does
(2) starts a subordinate clause, a particular kind known as a relative clause

Within the relatively clause, the pronoun "which" may be the subject or direct object or object of a preposition.
I learned about yoga, which changed my life. = "which" as subject
I just read a good book, which my doctor recommended. = "which" as direct object
Here is a book for which I wrote the preface. = "which" as object of preposition "for"
Here is a book in which the author criticizes his own writing style.. = "which" as object of preposition "in"
One way to think about these last cases: imagine we changed each long sentence into two smaller sentences.
Here is a book. I wrote the preface for it.
Here is a book. In it, the author criticizes his own writing style.

Those are choppier, not as smooth as the longer analogs. Notice, though: whatever role the pronoun "it" has in the second shorter sentence is the role of the pronoun "which" in the longer sentence.

That's a very brief overview. The problem is: to explain this thoroughly, I would have to explain all of grammar. Again, I would suggest the Magoosh lesson videos for a thorough overview. I would also recommend this blog article:
https://magoosh.com/gmat/2014/how-to-im ... bal-score/

You may also find this article illuminating:
https://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/that-vs-w ... -the-gmat/

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)


Hi Mike,

In your second example of the explanation - I just read a good book which the doctor recommended.
Is the second part a essential clause?
I think it doesn't require a comma before which. Is that right? Or can it be both in this sentence?

Also - in the correct answer for this question, would the answer still be right without "in which"?

Thanks
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Re: The CEO of Laminar Flow gave his R & D team a new $300 million dollar  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jul 2017, 23:34
gmatter0913 wrote:
A very nice question and a very useful concept. Thanks Mike.


I got it wrong. Clicked D.

Could you please explain the concept. I actually had no logical approach. :(
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Re: The CEO of Laminar Flow gave his R & D team a new $300 million dollar  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jul 2017, 01:08
mikemcgarry wrote:
The CEO of Laminar Flow gave his R & D team a new $300 million dollar research facility, with cutting-edge technology, that they can research potentially revolutionary innovations in.
(A) that they can research potentially revolutionary innovations in
(B) for conducting research about revolutionarily potential innovations
(C) that can be the place for them to research potentially revolutionary innovations
(D) where it would be conducting research into revolutionary potential innovations
(E) in which to conduct research into potentially revolutionary innovations


For a discussion of the Infinitive of Purpose, as well as the OE to this particular question, see:
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2014/the-infini ... orrection/

Mike :-)


Dear Mike,

Excellent question that stimulates my thinking :-D

I have questions about choices D & E

Choice D

1- Is 'where' correctly used? my analysis is that it is correct because we talk about physical location so no problem. Am I right?

2- Is the phrase 'revolutionary potential innovations' correct or has problems? I think it is in for of [Adjective] + [Adjective] + [Noun], if correct, do I need 'comma' or 'and' between the adjectives?

Choice E

1- As I know 'in which should be followed by clause. Is there some ellipses? I understand the choice as follows:

'in which [the team can use] to conduct research into potentially revolutionary innovations'

Is my analysis correct?

Thanks in advance
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Re: The CEO of Laminar Flow gave his R & D team a new $300 million dollar &nbs [#permalink] 17 Jul 2017, 01:08

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