GMAT Question of the Day: Daily via email | Daily via Instagram New to GMAT Club? Watch this Video

It is currently 06 Aug 2020, 01:59

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

50 animals competed for prizes at a certain fair. How many of the anim

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
SVP
SVP
avatar
V
Joined: 23 Feb 2015
Posts: 2010
GMAT ToolKit User
50 animals competed for prizes at a certain fair. How many of the anim  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 03 Jun 2020, 12:27
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  15% (low)

Question Stats:

82% (00:44) correct 18% (00:48) wrong based on 44 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

50 animals competed for prizes at a certain fair. How many of the animals won prizes?

(1) Of the animals that competed, 100% of the cows won prizes.
(2) Of the animals that competed, 50% of the non-cows won prizes.

Same types question:

LINK 1
LINK 2

Originally posted by TheUltimateWinner on 28 May 2020, 09:57.
Last edited by TheUltimateWinner on 03 Jun 2020, 12:27, edited 2 times in total.
SVP
SVP
avatar
V
Joined: 23 Feb 2015
Posts: 2010
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: 50 animals competed for prizes at a certain fair. How many of the anim  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 May 2020, 10:00
Asad wrote:
50 animals competed for prizes at a certain fair. How many of the animals won prizes?
1) Of the animals that competed, 100% of the cows won prizes.
2) Of the animals that competed, 50% of the non-cows won prizes.

Hello Experts,
EMPOWERgmatRichC, VeritasKarishma, IanStewart, chetan2u, ArvindCrackVerbal, GMATinsight

I have a query on this question..
We should never keep our eyes on statement 2 when we check statement 1, right? So, how will someone know that there are 2 segment (i.e., cows VS non-cows) without reading statement 2? Statement 1 directly says that 100%. That means there is nothing "left". So, why do we not consider statement 1 sufficient (apart from statement 2)? I mean: What's the wrong with someone if s/he takes all 50 animals as 'cows' group?
Note: Question prompt did not separate "animals" as 'cows' VS 'non-cows'. If statement 1 use 99% then we can think of another groups (i.e., non-cows). Also What if there is just 1 animal in the question prompt?
Thanks__
GMAT Tutor
avatar
P
Joined: 24 Jun 2008
Posts: 2395
Re: 50 animals competed for prizes at a certain fair. How many of the anim  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 May 2020, 11:06
1
Asad wrote:
I have a query on this question..
We should never keep our eyes on statement 2 when we check statement 1, right? So, how will someone know that there are 2 segment (i.e., cows VS non-cows) without reading statement 2?


Because some "animals" are not "cows". An animal might be a parrot or a donkey or an iguana or a fish. That's not something a question needs to tell a test taker.

Asad wrote:
Statement 1 directly says that 100%. That means there is nothing "left". So, why do we not consider statement 1 sufficient (apart from statement 2)? I mean: What's the wrong with someone if s/he takes all 50 animals as 'cows' group?


If Statement 1 said "100% of animals won prizes", it would be sufficient. But it doesn't say that. It only talks about some of the animals, the cows.

If someone did assume all 50 animals were cows, that person would be assuming something you don't know to be true; you don't know how all the animals are cows. So that person would be using more information than the question provides, and would thus be making a logical mistake.

Asad wrote:
Note: Question prompt did not separate "animals" as 'cows' VS 'non-cows'. If statement 1 use 99% then we can think of another groups (i.e., non-cows). Also What if there is just 1 animal in the question prompt?
Thanks__


Statement 1 can't use 99%, since that's mathematically impossible with only 50 animals in total (you'd get a decimal number of cows, which is impossible).

If there were only 1 animal in total, Statement 2 wouldn't make any sense. Statement 1 alone would be sufficient in that case, because there can't be zero cows (it doesn't make sense to say "100% of cows won prizes" if there are no cows at all). So you could then conclude that the one animal in question is a cow, and that it won a prize. But you'd never see that situation on the GMAT, so there's no reason to worry about it.
_________________
GMAT Tutor in Montreal

If you are looking for online GMAT math tutoring, or if you are interested in buying my advanced Quant books and problem sets, please contact me at ianstewartgmat at gmail.com
EMPOWERgmat Instructor
User avatar
V
Status: GMAT Assassin/Co-Founder
Affiliations: EMPOWERgmat
Joined: 19 Dec 2014
Posts: 17283
Location: United States (CA)
GMAT 1: 800 Q51 V49
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: 50 animals competed for prizes at a certain fair. How many of the anim  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 May 2020, 16:14
Asad wrote:
Asad wrote:
50 animals competed for prizes at a certain fair. How many of the animals won prizes?
1) Of the animals that competed, 100% of the cows won prizes.
2) Of the animals that competed, 50% of the non-cows won prizes.

Hello Experts,
EMPOWERgmatRichC, VeritasKarishma, IanStewart, chetan2u, ArvindCrackVerbal, GMATinsight

I have a query on this question..
We should never keep our eyes on statement 2 when we check statement 1, right? So, how will someone know that there are 2 segment (i.e., cows VS non-cows) without reading statement 2? Statement 1 directly says that 100%. That means there is nothing "left". So, why do we not consider statement 1 sufficient (apart from statement 2)? I mean: What's the wrong with someone if s/he takes all 50 animals as 'cows' group?
Note: Question prompt did not separate "animals" as 'cows' VS 'non-cows'. If statement 1 use 99% then we can think of another groups (i.e., non-cows). Also What if there is just 1 animal in the question prompt?
Thanks__


Hi Asad,

The prompt tells us that 50 ANIMALS competed for prizes. We're asked how MANY animals won prizes.

At the start, we have no idea what those 50 animals are (maybe all 50 animals are the same type of animal or maybe it's a 'mix' of animals); in addition, we don't know whether an animal can win MORE than one prize or not. Thus, we'll clearly need some really specific information to answer this question.

Fact 1 tells us that 100% OF the COWS won prizes. This tells us very little about the NUMBER of COWS or total winners or total prizes; we know that EVERY COW won at least one prize - but that does NOT mean that all 50 animals were cows (nor does it mean that there were 50 prizes). There could very easily have been OTHER animals competing for prizes. The information in Fact 2 has NO bearing on these deductions.

GMAT assassins aren't born, they're made,
Rich
_________________
Contact Rich at: Rich.C@empowergmat.com
Image


The Course Used By GMAT Club Moderators To Earn 750+

souvik101990 Score: 760 Q50 V42 ★★★★★
ENGRTOMBA2018 Score: 750 Q49 V44 ★★★★★
GMAT Tutor
avatar
P
Joined: 24 Jun 2008
Posts: 2395
Re: 50 animals competed for prizes at a certain fair. How many of the anim  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 May 2020, 17:45
EMPOWERgmatRichC wrote:
in addition, we don't know whether an animal can win MORE than one prize or not.


That is irrelevant; the question asks how many animals won prizes, not how many prizes were awarded.
_________________
GMAT Tutor in Montreal

If you are looking for online GMAT math tutoring, or if you are interested in buying my advanced Quant books and problem sets, please contact me at ianstewartgmat at gmail.com
PS Forum Moderator
User avatar
P
Joined: 18 Jan 2020
Posts: 1542
Location: India
GPA: 4
Premium Member CAT Tests
Re: 50 animals competed for prizes at a certain fair. How many of the anim  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 May 2020, 20:03
Asad wrote:
50 animals competed for prizes at a certain fair. How many of the animals won prizes?

(1) Of the animals that competed, 100% of the cows won prizes.
(2) Of the animals that competed, 50% of the non-cows won prizes.


I think whole question is based on speculation of "what if". If we exactly don't know what no. Or what constraint is used to define the no. of animals getting awards or how many awards, the question will give no particular answer.
Moreover GMAT never goes with speculation. We can't even state an universal truth as one, if it's not mentioned in question.

Posted from my mobile device
Math Expert
avatar
V
Joined: 02 Aug 2009
Posts: 8795
Re: 50 animals competed for prizes at a certain fair. How many of the anim  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 31 May 2020, 08:20
Asad wrote:
Asad wrote:
50 animals competed for prizes at a certain fair. How many of the animals won prizes?
1) Of the animals that competed, 100% of the cows won prizes.
2) Of the animals that competed, 50% of the non-cows won prizes.


I have a query on this question..
We should never keep our eyes on statement 2 when we check statement 1, right? So, how will someone know that there are 2 segment (i.e., cows VS non-cows) without reading statement 2? Statement 1 directly says that 100%. That means there is nothing "left". So, why do we not consider statement 1 sufficient (apart from statement 2)? I mean: What's the wrong with someone if s/he takes all 50 animals as 'cows' group?
Note: Question prompt did not separate "animals" as 'cows' VS 'non-cows'. If statement 1 use 99% then we can think of another groups (i.e., non-cows). Also What if there is just 1 animal in the question prompt?
Thanks__


It is not mentioned that animals means just cows, so you cannot make that mistake in DS of reading more than what is given.

A similar case would be when we say..
In a class, 100% of girls passed.
If we were looking for % of total passed, we cannot say that the class consists of only girls.
_________________
Stern School Moderator
User avatar
G
Joined: 26 May 2020
Posts: 334
Concentration: General Management, Technology
WE: Analyst (Computer Software)
CAT Tests
Re: 50 animals competed for prizes at a certain fair. How many of the anim  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 31 May 2020, 19:32
Asad wrote:
50 animals competed for prizes at a certain fair. How many of the animals won prizes?

(1) Of the animals that competed, 100% of the cows won prizes.
(2) Of the animals that competed, 50% of the non-cows won prizes.

Same types question:

LINK 1


E IMO.


Statement 1 : Of the animals that competed, 100% of the cows won prizes. -- we dono how many cows from the animals .. so Insufficient

Statement 2 : Of the animals that competed, 50% of the non-cows won prizes. -- we dono how many non -cows from the animals .. so Insufficient

Combining both also gives no info about COws and non-cows .. We can have 30 cows and 20 non-cows -- Prizes won = 30 + 10 = 40
-----------------------------------------------------------------------Or we can have 20 Cows and 30 non-cows ----- Prizes won = 20 + 15 = 35 .

So Combining also not sufficient . Hence E .
_________________
Thank you.
Regards,
Ashish A Das.

The more realistic you are during your practice, the more confident you will be during the CAT.
GMAT Club Bot
Re: 50 animals competed for prizes at a certain fair. How many of the anim   [#permalink] 31 May 2020, 19:32

50 animals competed for prizes at a certain fair. How many of the anim

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





cron

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne