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Although the term “psychopath” is popularly

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Although the term “psychopath” is popularly [#permalink]

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New post 16 Feb 2005, 08:29
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Although the term “psychopath” is popularly applied to an especially brutal criminal, in psychology it is someone who is apparently incapable of feeling compassion or the pangs of conscience.

(A) it is someone who is
(B) it is a person
(C) they are people who are
(D) it refers to someone who is
(E) it is in reference to people
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA
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New post 16 Feb 2005, 08:52
well please discuss, why the wrong choices are wrong.

will post the OA later
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New post 16 Feb 2005, 09:02
the pronoun it clearly refers to the term psychopath, and is is the correct pronoun for someone. (D) for me.
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Re: sc - psychopath [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jul 2007, 02:13
OA is D
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Re: sc - psychopath [#permalink]

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dipaksingh wrote:
Although the term “psychopath” is popularly applied to an especially brutal criminal, in psychology (it is someone who is) apparently incapable of feeling compassion or the pangs of conscience.

(A) it is someone who is
(B) it is a person
(C) they are people who are
(D) it refers to someone who is
(E) it is in reference to people


C - 'they' wrong

A,B - a term 'it' can not be a person - awkward - wrong
E - awkward

D - best
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Re: sc - psychopath [#permalink]

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New post 06 Apr 2012, 23:44
a. parallelism issue - term compared with person
b. parallelism issue - term compared with person
c. parallelism issue - term compared with person
d. correct
e. wordier - option D is better than this
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Re: Although the term “psychopath” is popularly [#permalink]

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New post 16 Aug 2013, 05:34
dipaksingh wrote:
Although the term “psychopath” is popularly applied to an especially brutal criminal, in psychology (it is someone who is) apparently incapable of feeling compassion or the pangs of conscience.

(A) it is someone who is
(B) it is a person
(C) they are people who are
(D) it refers to someone who is
(E) it is in reference to people



It is a typical pronoun reference problem,

The "it" here cannot refer to a person but should refer to "the term".
A, B are ruled out because they imply that it is referring to a person.
C cannot be an option as it introduces a plural pronoun
E is wordy and inappropriate!

We're left with D :-D
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Re: Although the term “psychopath” is popularly [#permalink]

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New post 04 Sep 2014, 04:44
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Although the term “psychopath” is popularly [#permalink]

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Although the term “psychopath” is popularly applied to an especially brutal criminal, in psychology it is someone who is apparently incapable of feeling compassion or the pangs of conscience.

Subjet of the sentence is " term "
(A) it is someone who is - it = term, so " term " cannot be someone.
(B) it is a person - it = term, so " term " cannot be someone.
(C) they are people who are - they? there is not plural subject in the sentence above.
CORRECT (D) it refers to someone who is - "term" refers to someone who is
(E) it is in reference to people - people is plural.
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Re: Although the term “psychopath” is popularly [#permalink]

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New post 10 Oct 2014, 03:52
Psychopathy is a term not a person so D is correct.
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Re: Although the term “psychopath” is popularly [#permalink]

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New post 01 Sep 2015, 17:50
egmat

Hi Egmat,

I was going through your post (https://e-gmat.com/blog/gmat-verbal/eng ... -ambiguity) on pronoun ambiguity where you have highlighted a couple of points

I tried applying those rules in this question but somehow i feel that either i have missed something or i have misunderstood something. I would be happy if you could clarify it.


Although the term “psychopath” is popularly applied to an especially brutal criminal, in psychology it is someone who is apparently incapable of feeling compassion or the pangs of conscience.

(A) it is someone who is
(B) it is a person
(C) they are people who are
(D) it refers to someone who is
(E) it is in reference to people

According to the post :

A)
1) first find the logical antecedent -----psychopath

This makes sense.

2) Find if there are other nouns that play the same role.

It could be criminal or term as well

term doesnot make sense but criminal does

Pronoun ambiguity.

B) It should logically refer to psychopath---logical

Other nouns criminal and term.

Term doesnot make sense but criminal does

C) is wrong

D) Still makes sense with criminal and psychopath---ambiguity.




COuld you please let me know where i am going wrong.
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Although the term “psychopath” is popularly [#permalink]

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Meaning
Entire sentence is talking about the term "psychopath". Not the person. What is believed to be and what it really is

Error :
Meaning error - " it is someone " It refers to term "Psychopath" , now think .. can a term become person.
E.g : the word "sir" refers to knowledgeable people. or "the word Sir is knowledgeable people"
i think first version is correct. Isn't it ?

We need to say term refers to some kind of people not term is some kind of people


(A) it is someone who is
Meaning error - as discussed above

(B) it is a person
Meaning error - as discussed above
We need a relative clause to describe a person

(C) they are people who are
They should be refereed to "term", but here in this option "they" does not have . any antecedant

(D) it refers to someone who is


(E) it is in reference to people
Option E will be like
it is in reference to people apparently incapable of feeling compassion or the pangs of conscience - lot of things described about people, it will be good if we can club them all in relative clause (like in Option A,C,D)
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Re: Although the term “psychopath” is popularly [#permalink]

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New post 03 Sep 2015, 07:10
kirtivardhan wrote:
A)
1) first find the logical antecedent -----psychopath

This makes sense.

Hi Kirti, I am just wondering if you are clear with the antecedent eligibility criterion in Pronouns; to me this concept is more important that pronoun ambiguity, for the simple reason that there are quite a few examples in official sources where the correct answer has a genuine issue with pronoun being ambiguous. Hence, the current school of thought is that pronoun ambiguity should actually not be the first reason for you to eliminate an answer choice.

Coming to this question, antecedent eligibility would imply that it as a pronoun cannot refer to persons; in other words, persons are not eligible to be referred to, by pronoun it. Hence, in this case, it cannot refer to the person psychopath.

Basically, it does not refer to psychopath, but to the term psychopath”. Now it is hopefully clear why A is incorrect, because it says: the term psychopath is someone. This is incorrect from a comparison perspective, because term cannot be a person (someone); rather, term can refer to someone.

Hence, D wins.

p.s. Our book EducationAisle Sentence Correction Nirvana discusses Pronoun eligibility and ambiguity, its application and examples in significant detail. If someone is interested, PM me your email-id, I can mail the corresponding section.
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Re: Although the term “psychopath” is popularly [#permalink]

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New post 05 Sep 2016, 05:05
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

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Re: Although the term “psychopath” is popularly [#permalink]

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New post 14 May 2017, 14:59
dipaksingh wrote:
Although the term “psychopath” is popularly applied to an especially brutal criminal, in psychology it is someone who is apparently incapable of feeling compassion or the pangs of conscience.

(A) it is someone who is
(B) it is a person
(C) they are people who are
(D) it refers to someone who is
(E) it is in reference to people


A A "term" cannot be a "someone."
B A "term" cannot be a "person."
C A "term" cannot be a "they."
D Correct.
E "People" is plural whereas "term" and "criminal" are both singular.
Re: Although the term “psychopath” is popularly   [#permalink] 14 May 2017, 14:59
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