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Beatrix Potter, in her book illustrations, carefully coordinating them

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Re: Beatrix Potter, in her book illustrations, carefully coordinating them  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Dec 2019, 06:47
1
TheNightKing I see that your question is left unanswered. Yes, pronoun "which" can refer to a singular or a plural noun as well as a noun phrase. Here is self-made example:

Bob was hungry and attempted to eat ten hot-dogs, which were very spicy, in one minute, but he underestimated his ability to chew and swallow food quickly. Luckily, Bob never choked :)

Even if we drop the modifier - which were very spicy - the meaning of the sentence is clear.

Hope it helps.
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Re: Beatrix Potter, in her book illustrations, carefully coordinating them  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Dec 2019, 07:15
mykrasovski wrote:
TheNightKing I see that your question is left unanswered. Yes, pronoun "which" can refer to a singular or a plural noun as well as a noun phrase. Here is self-made example:

Bob was hungry and attempted to eat ten hot-dogs, which were very spicy, in one minute, but he underestimated his ability to chew and swallow food quickly. Luckily, Bob never choked :)

Even if we drop the modifier - which were very spicy - the meaning of the sentence is clear.

Hope it helps.


Thank you for helping out.

P.S: It's weird that you forget about your question but then months later someone clears your doubt :lol:
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Re: Beatrix Potter, in her book illustrations, carefully coordinating them  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jun 2020, 10:40
A humble request – Please give KUDOS if you like the response.
Let us first dissect the sentence.
Beatrix Potter, in her book illustrations, carefully coordinating them with her narratives, capitalized on her keen observation and love of the natural world.
in her book illustrations, - modifies potter
carefully coordinating them with her narratives – modifies illustrations.
In this sentence it is unclear what them refers to.


(A) Beatrix Potter, in her book illustrations, carefully coordinating them with her narratives,
we have verb-ing modifier “coordinating” after comma. The rule is if the verb-ing modifier is placed after comma, then it modifies the entire preceding clause.

(B) In her book illustrations, carefully coordinating them with her narratives, Beatrix Potter
In this sentence it is unclear what them refers to.
we have verb-ing modifier “coordinating” after comma. The rule is if the verb-ing modifier is placed after comma, then it modifies the entire preceding clause.

(C) In her book illustrations, which she carefully coordinated with her narratives, Beatrix Potter

This appears to be a correct choice.
If you are still reading my post please hit the KUDOS button.

(D) Carefully coordinated with her narratives, Beatrix Potter, in her book illustrations
This changes the meaning fo the sentence. BP is not coordinated.

(E) Beatrix Potter, in her book illustrations, carefully coordinated them with her narratives and
In this sentence it is unclear what them refers to.
Thank you for reading the post. Request you to please hit the KUDOS button.
Answer is C.
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Re: Beatrix Potter, in her book illustrations, carefully coordinating them  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jun 2020, 18:53
Beatrix Potter, in her book illustrations, carefully coordinating them with her narratives, capitalized on her keen observation and love of the natural world.


(A) Beatrix Potter, in her book illustrations, carefully coordinating them with her narratives,

Here, "coordinating" is ambiguous because it could modify either BP or book illustrations.

(B) In her book illustrations, carefully coordinating them with her narratives, Beatrix Potter

The "coordinating" is verb+ing with comma modifier. Remember, this kind of modifier only modifies the previous clause (in comparison, verb+ing without comma only modifies a noun preceding it). However, "coordinating" cannot modify the prepositional phrase "in her book illustration".
In addition, we could eliminate B contextually: "them" could only refer to book illustrations. However, coordinating book illustrations in book illustrations is simply wrong.


(C) In her book illustrations, which she carefully coordinated with her narratives, Beatrix Potter

(D) Carefully coordinated with her narratives, Beatrix Potter, in her book illustrations

Here, "coordinated" became passive --> BP is coordinated... wrong!

(E) Beatrix Potter, in her book illustrations, carefully coordinated them with her narratives and

One easy but not so obvious reason to eliminate this is that there is a comma after the underlined "and". There is another reason which is similar to B. Here, "them" means BP carefully coordinated book illustrations in her book illustrations. Wrong!
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Re: Beatrix Potter, in her book illustrations, carefully coordinating them  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jun 2020, 04:44
Quote:
Hi badplanner,

Beatrix Potter, in her book illustrations, carefully coordinating them with her narratives, capitalized on her keen observation and love of the natural world.

Choice B: In her book illustrations, carefully coordinating them with her narratives, Beatrix Potter
In this choice, we have verb-ing modifier “coordinating” after comma. The rule is if the verb-ing modifier is placed after comma, then it modifies the entire preceding clause. However, in this choice, there is not clause before the comma.

You are correct in saying that Beatrix Potter did the action of “coordinating” and logically it should refer to Potter. However, the placement of this modifier is such that it fails to do what it should do. Hence, logically “coordinating” is modifying Potter but grammatically it is not because of it placement after comma.

Let’s compare this choice with the example you have presented:

Walking along the road, Beatrix Potter saw several types of flowers.

There is no modifier error in this sentence. The sentence begins with the verb-ing modifier “walking”, and correctly modifies the subject of the main clause “Beatrix Potter” because she did the action of walking. Notice here that there is no comma before the verb-ing modifier.
In choice B of this OG question, we do have a comma before the verb-ing modifier. Thus it should modify the preceding clause. But there is no clause there. I also quite don’t agree to all the explanations of OG. They have terrific questions but not all the explanations are that good.

The usage of Verb-ing Modifiers has been covered in excruciating details in the "Modifiers - Verb-ing" Concept in the Level 1 Preview Concepts. This section is available for free. Just login to e-gmat.com, register for free and learn the concept.

Hope this helps.
Thanks.
Shraddha


egmat
Thank you for the explanation.
Just to be sure that my understanding is correct, are the below sentences grammatically correct?

a) Beatrix Potter, in her book illustrations, carefully coordinating them with her narratives, capitalized on her keen observation and love of the natural world.


b) In her book illustrations, carefully coordinating them with her narratives, Beatrix Potter apitalized on her keen observation and love of the natural world.
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Re: Beatrix Potter, in her book illustrations, carefully coordinating them  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jul 2020, 15:40
Any solid reason to eliminate (E)?
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Re: Beatrix Potter, in her book illustrations, carefully coordinating them  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jul 2020, 15:15
lakshya14 wrote:
Any solid reason to eliminate (E)?

Have you tried reviewing this post?
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Re: Beatrix Potter, in her book illustrations, carefully coordinating them   [#permalink] 03 Jul 2020, 15:15

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