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In her presentation, the head of the Better Business Bureau emphasized

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Re: In her presentation, the head of the Better Business Bureau emphasized  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Oct 2019, 02:50
shubhgmat wrote:
shubhgmat wrote:
I am still not 100 % sure why b is not close. I marked D but took some time to mark it. I was unable to strike out B for any good reason.

Posted from my mobile device


Is b wrong only because ‘an’ is missing before expense.



B is incorrect because the idiomatic structure is explicitly violated as I mentioned in my post above.
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New post 17 Jan 2020, 09:17
shubhgmat wrote:
shubhgmat wrote:
I am still not 100 % sure why b is not close. I marked D but took some time to mark it. I was unable to strike out B for any good reason.

Posted from my mobile device


Is b wrong only because ‘an’ is missing before expense.



I suppose you are correct because an is inserted before investment. So an should be inserted before expense to maintain parallelism.
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In her presentation, the head of the Better Business Bureau emphasized  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jan 2020, 09:44
sjuniv32 wrote:
I suppose you are correct because an is inserted before investment. So an should be inserted before expense to maintain parallelism.
Hi sjuniv32,

The an issue is not really related to parallelism. We should instead take a call on the basis of whether the word we are looking at needs an an or not. For example:

... regard that sofa as not an investment but furniture...

Because we can't say a furniture, we leave the a out after but.
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New post 18 Jan 2020, 08:54
AjiteshArun wrote:
sjuniv32 wrote:
I suppose you are correct because an is inserted before investment. So an should be inserted before expense to maintain parallelism.
Hi sjuniv32,

The an issue is not really related to parallelism. We should instead take a call on the basis of whether the word we are looking at needs an an or not. For example:

... regard that sofa as not an investment but furniture...

Because we can't say a furniture, we leave the a out after but.



Thanks a lot. B should be eliminated for violation of the idiomatic structure then.
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New post 19 Jan 2020, 07:41
Dear Friends,

Here is a detailed explanation to this question-

AbdurRakib wrote:
In her presentation, the head of the Better Business Bureau emphasized that companies should think of the cost of conventions and other similar gatherings as not an expense, but as an investment in networking that will pay dividends.

A) as not an expense,but as
B) as not expense,but
C) not an expense,rather
D) not as an expense,but as
E) not in terms of expense,but


Choice A: In this answer choice, the phrase "as not an expense" breaks parallelism with the phrase "but as an investment". Thus, this answer choice is incorrect.

Choice B: In this answer choice, the phrase "as not expense" breaks parallelism with the phrase "but as an investment". Thus, this answer choice is incorrect.

Choice C: In this answer choice, the construction "think of ... an" is incorrect; the word "as" must precede the word "an". Thus, this answer choice is incorrect.

Choice D: In this answer choice, parallelism and proper idiom construction are maintained throughout the sentence. Thus, this answer choice is correct.

Choice E: This answer choice repeats the error seen in Option C. Thus, this answer choice is incorrect.


Hence, D is the best answer choice.

All the best!
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In her presentation, the head of the Better Business Bureau emphasized  [#permalink]

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New post 16 May 2020, 06:37
Hello Experts,
How a sentence is legitimate that discusses about a pronoun (i.e., her) without using the proper antecedent?
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New post 16 May 2020, 13:13
Asad wrote:
Hello Experts,
How a sentence is legitimate that discusses about a pronoun (i.e., her) without using the proper antecedent?
Thanks__

Hello, Asad. The short answer is that it is fine to place a pronoun ahead of its antecedent as you see in the question at hand. Such a feature in linguistics is known as anticipatory anaphora or, perhaps a bit less formally, cataphora. The following are two related articles you may find interesting on the subject:

1) Language Log: Pronouns with following Antecedents in Subordinate Clauses
As the title suggests, this article examines the phenomenon with subordinate clauses rather than phrases.

2) Cataphora in English Grammar
This article has plenty of examples, including those with both subordinate clauses and phrases.

Happy reading.

- Andrew
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New post 16 May 2020, 20:06
VenoMfTw wrote:
AbdurRakib wrote:
In her presentation, the head of the Better Business Bureau emphasized that companies should think of the cost of conventions and other similar gatherings as not an expense, but as an investment in networking that will pay dividends.

A) as not an expense,but as
B) as not expense,but
C) not an expense,rather
D) not as an expense,but as
E) not in terms of expense,but



Correct Idiom: Not X but Y
Where X must be parallel to Y.

A-- Not (an expense) but (as) -- Not parallel
B-- Not (expense) but an investment -- Not parallel
C-- Not (an expense), rather -- Correct idiom is Not X, but rather Y

D-- Not (as an expense), but (as an expense) -- Parallel
E-- Not (in terms of expense), but (an investment) -- Not parallel


Can you please explain why B is not parallel?

expense and investment are same part of speech.

thanks a lot in advance.
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New post 16 May 2020, 20:13
mcelroytutoring wrote:
Keats wrote:
Can anyone explain why B is incorrect?

Is the missing "an" the only problem?

mcelroytutoring, HanoiGMATtutor: Any views?

In her presentation, the head of the Better Business Bureau emphasized that companies should think of the cost of conventions and other similar gatherings as not an expense, but as an investment in networking that will pay dividends.

A) as not an expense, but as
B) as not expense, but
C) not an expense, rather
D) not as an expense, but as
E) not in terms of expense, but


Of course, happy to help and flex the grammar muscles a bit.

A) not bad. However, it's not perfect, because of the incorrect order of the words "as" and "not". For example, there is a reason why we say "not bad", and not, "bad not". The "not" is the more important word in this sentence and thus should come first, for clarity.
B) missing the 2nd "as" (in addition to the "an")
C) the mystery of the disappearing "as"s
D) correct
E) same as C
[/quote

In the answer choice B, why "as" is not carried automatically to the construction after "but"?
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New post 16 May 2020, 20:36
EMPOWERgmatVerbal wrote:
Hello Everyone!

This is a great example of a question that deals with idiomatic structures! Let's take a closer look to determine the correct answer - and do it quickly! To get started, here is the original question with the main differences highlighted in orange:

In her presentation, the head of the Better Business Bureau emphasized that companies should think of the cost of conventions and other similar gatherings as not an expense, but as an investment in networking that will pay dividends.

A) as not an expense, but as
B) as not expense, but
C) not an expense, rather
D) not as an expense, but as
E) not in terms of expense, but

It's clear from looking over the question quickly that we're dealing with an idiomatic structure that also uses parallel structure. The idiomatic structure we're dealing with here is:

not X, but Y

In this case, both X and Y must be written using parallel structure and wording. For example:

The autumn leaves were not a bright yellow, but were a deep golden hue. --> WRONG
The autumn leaves were not a bright yellow, but a deep golden hue. --> RIGHT

To check for idiomatic structure and parallelism, let's go ahead and add in the phrase "an investment" to the end of each one to fully round out the phrase. Once we've done that, it should be pretty clear which options don't follow the idiomatic structure:

A) as not an expense, but as an investment --> WRONG
(The verb "as" needs to be part of both phrases, or not at all. In this case, it's part of one half, but not the other, making in not parallel in format).

B) as not expense, but an investment --> WRONG
(The word "an" needs to be part of both phrases. In this case, the verb "an" is before the word "not," which means it isn't part of the idiomatic structure. This is another example of a non parallel structure.)

C) not an expense, rather an investment --> WRONG
(While this option DOES use parallel structure for the X and Y by saying "an expense" and "an investment," it's still wrong! It doesn't follow the basic idiomatic structure of "not X, but Y." It uses "not X, rather Y" instead, which is wrong.)

D) not as an expense, but as an investment --> CORRECT
(This uses the correct format of the idiomatic structure "not X, but Y." Both X and Y are written in the same format, with the phrase "as an" at the beginning of each one. Therefore, this is the CORRECT choice!)

E) not in terms of expense, but an investment --> WRONG
(Here is another case of the X and Y not being written using parallel structure. They both need to start with the phrase "in terms of" in them, or both need to start with "an" in them to be parallel.)

There you have it! Option D is the correct option because it's the only one that uses the idiomatic structure "not X, but Y" correctly!


Don't study for the GMAT. Train for it.



Hi Empower GMAT,

Thank you for the detailed explanation.

In your example sentence, the word "were" is right before the Not X But Y structure and it automatically carries over to bright color and deep golden hue.

The autumn leaves were not a bright yellow, but were a deep golden hue. --> WRONG
The autumn leaves were not a bright yellow, but a deep golden hue. --> RIGHT


In the answer choice B the word "as" is right before the Not X but Y structure. Why the answer choice does not read "as an investment" like it did in your example answer?
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Re: In her presentation, the head of the Better Business Bureau emphasized  [#permalink]

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New post 23 May 2020, 05:30
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imnik wrote:
Can you please explain why B is not parallel?

expense and investment are same part of speech.

thanks a lot in advance.

First, let's review the parallelism in the correct choice (D):

Quote:
... the head of the Better Business Bureau emphasized that companies should think of the cost of conventions and other similar gatherings not (1) as an expense, but (2) as an investment in networking that will pay dividends.

The two items in the list certainly LOOK parallel--both have the form, "as an [noun]". But to be sure, let's imagine what the sentence would look like if we only had one or the other:

    1) "... companies should think of the cost of [X] as an expense."
    2) "... companies should think of the cost of [X] as an investment in networking."

Grammatically, these are both fine. That's because both items in the parallel list ("as an expense" and "as an investment") can logically follow "cost of conventions and other similar gatherings".

Now let's check choice (B):

Quote:
... the head of the BBB emphasized that companies should think of the cost of conventions and other similar gatherings as not (1) expense, but (2) an investment in networking that will pay dividends.

The first red flags is that the two items in the list do NOT have the same form: the first is a noun without an article (a/an/the), and the second is a noun with an article ("an"). But to be sure, let's do the same test with choice (D):

    1) "... companies should think of the cost of [X] as expense."
    2) "... companies should think of the cost of as [X] an investment in networking."

The second one is okay, but notice that the first option doesn't work because it's missing an article for "expense"! Choice (D) avoids that problem by putting an article ("an") in front of each item in the parallel list. That makes (D) a better choice.

And if you want a long-winded on special parallelism triggers (both/and, either/or, not/but), here it is: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bXRz0RBLNus.

I hope that helps!
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New post 23 May 2020, 12:47
GMATNinja wrote:
imnik wrote:
Can you please explain why B is not parallel?

expense and investment are same part of speech.

thanks a lot in advance.

First, let's review the parallelism in the correct choice (D):

Quote:
... the head of the Better Business Bureau emphasized that companies should think of the cost of conventions and other similar gatherings not (1) as an expense, but (2) as an investment in networking that will pay dividends.

The two items in the list certainly LOOK parallel--both have the form, "as an [noun]". But to be sure, let's imagine what the sentence would look like if we only had one or the other:

    1) "... companies should think of the cost of [X] as an expense."
    2) "... companies should think of the cost of [X] as an investment in networking."

Grammatically, these are both fine. That's because both items in the parallel list ("as an expense" and "as an investment") can logically follow "cost of conventions and other similar gatherings".

Now let's check choice (B):

Quote:
... the head of the BBB emphasized that companies should think of the cost of conventions and other similar gatherings as not (1) expense, but (2) an investment in networking that will pay dividends.

The first red flags is that the two items in the list do NOT have the same form: the first is a noun without an article (a/an/the), and the second is a noun with an article ("an"). But to be sure, let's do the same test with choice (D):

    1) "... companies should think of the cost of [X] as expense."
    2) "... companies should think of the cost of as [X] an investment in networking."

The second one is okay, but notice that the first option doesn't work because it's missing an article for "expense"! Choice (D) avoids that problem by putting an article ("an") in front of each item in the parallel list. That makes (D) a better choice.

And if you want a long-winded on special parallelism triggers (both/and, either/or, not/but), here it is: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bXRz0RBLNus.

I hope that helps!



Hi GmatNinja!

Thank you for answering my question and the explanation.


The correct idiom is Not X but Y

If there is an article/helping verb just preceding Not, does it apply to both X and Y terms?

For Example:

the boy was not running but walking.

In the above sentence, running is X and walking is Y.


the sentence can be read as both ways:

The boy was not running
The boy was walking

In both sentences the word "was" was outside the idiom structure but applied to both X and Y terms.

in the answer choice B, the word "as" is outside the Not X but Y idiom structure. Shouldn't it be read as:

...similar gathering as not expense
... similar gathering as an investment.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_cont ... e=emb_logo Please refer to this video about what i meant by the common word
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New post 23 May 2020, 19:29
In her presentation, the head of the Better Business Bureau emphasized that companies should think of the cost of conventions and other similar gatherings as not an expense, but as an investment in networking that will pay dividends.

[ general structure: You should think of (something) not as X, but as Y ]

A) as not an expense,but as - Incorrect idiom. Hence, eliminate (A)

B) as not expense,but - this literally tells us that the convention should be considered as 'not expense'. But intended meaning of the sentence was to convey the idea that the gatherings should be considered as 'an investment', not as 'an expense'. (B) distorts the meaning of the sentence. hence, eliminate (B).

C) not an expense,rather - idiom error. Hence, eliminate (C).

D) not as an expense,but as - uses the right idiom structure (Not X but Y). Hence, (D) is the right answer.

E) not in terms of expense,but - what follows the 'but' coordinating conjunction is not a prepositional phrase. But what follows 'Not' is a prepositional phrase. Since the terms being contrasted (by the idiom idiom Not X but Y) are not comparable, E is incorrect. Hence, eliminate (E)
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