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Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, because he was

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Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, because he was  [#permalink]

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New post 06 May 2008, 20:23
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Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, because he was excited with the prospects of harnessing Niagara Falls for producing electric power, he predicted in the mid-1890's that electricity generated at Niagara would one day power the streetcars of London and the streetlights of Paris.

(A) Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, because he was excited with the prospects of harnessing Niagara Falls for producing electric power, he

(B) The prospects of harnessing Niagara Falls to produce electric power was exciting to Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, and so he

(C) Excited about the prospects of harnessing Niagara Falls to produce electric power, Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current,

(D) Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, excited about the prospects of harnessing Niagara Falls for the production of electric power and

(E) The inventor of alternating current, excited with the prospects of harnessing Niagara Falls for producing of electric power, Nikola Tesla

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Re: Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, because he was  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Oct 2014, 15:37
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One quick way to see that "excited" is not a verb here is that it is separated from the potential subject (Tesla) by a comma. I would never say "Bill Gates, founded Microsoft." Another clue is that "excited" would not be used as a verb unless Tesla were exciting something or someone else. For instance, "The rapper excited the crowd by throwing money off the stage." Tesla was the one who was excited--he wasn't doing the exciting.
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Re: Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, because he was  [#permalink]

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New post 06 May 2008, 20:38
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My Pick is C.

(A) Nikola Tesla, ........, because he was excited with the prospects of harnessing Niagara Falls for producing electric power, he
(B) The prospects of harnessing Niagara Falls to produce electric power was exciting to Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, and so he
(C)
D and E just don't make any sense at all, plain bad.
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Re: Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, because he was  [#permalink]

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New post 07 May 2008, 03:29
C) - It correctly place the modifiers, not too far from subject.
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Re: Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, because he was  [#permalink]

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New post 07 May 2008, 19:14
sondenso wrote:
Why not D?
I see D very close to!


The sentence D just does not complete itself.
Try removing the clause and the sentence reads like:

Nikola Tesla excited about (blah blah) and predicted

A better construction would have been:
Nikola Tesla excited about (blah blah), predicted
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Re: Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, because he was  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Oct 2014, 10:55
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In this question with Option D

Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, excited about the prospects of harnessing Niagara Falls for the
production of electric power and predicted in the mid-1890's that electricity generated at Niagara
would one day power the streetcars of London and the streetlights of Paris.

I am not able to understand how --- > excited is participle adjective and predicted is verb

excited can be a verb ( expressing state of Nikola ) and predicted another verb ( hence parallel )

So confusion is how to identify in such sentences which -ed is verb and which -ed is participle ?

Will appreciate your response
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Re: Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, because he was  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jul 2016, 00:34
Hello,

Sorry for opening this thread after so long.

Can you explain in 'E' except for the usage of excited with , what else is wrong?

Also, generally can I say that construction such as Modifier 1, Modifier 2, Subject is wrong? Both modifiers modifying the subject.

Thanks in advance

DmitryFarber wrote:
One quick way to see that "excited" is not a verb here is that it is separated from the potential subject (Tesla) by a comma. I would never say "Bill Gates, founded Microsoft." Another clue is that "excited" would not be used as a verb unless Tesla were exciting something or someone else. For instance, "The rapper excited the crowd by throwing money off the stage." Tesla was the one who was excited--he wasn't doing the exciting.
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Re: Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, because he was  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Aug 2016, 18:44
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correct idiom:


excite by or excite about

e. The inventor of alternating current, excited with the prospects of harnessing Niagara falls for producing electric power, Nikola Tesla

placement of modifier : The inventor of alternating current _ excited with the prospects of harnessing Niagara falls for producing electric power : first modifier is not modifying second modifier as there no relation between The inventor of alternating current and the fact that nicole tesla is excited about something.

Correct answer C remove that very efficiently - Excited about the prospects of harnessing Niagara Falls to produce electric power, Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current
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Re: Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, because he was  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Nov 2017, 08:50
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Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, because he was excited with the prospects of harnessing Niagara Falls for producing electric power, he predicted in the mid-1890's that electricity generated at Niagara would one day power the streetcars of London and the streetlights of Paris.

(A) Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, because he was excited with the prospects of harnessing Niagara Falls for producing electric power, he - excited with is unidiomatic - You can be excited by something or you can be excited about something,
(B) The prospects of harnessing Niagara Falls to produce electric power was exciting to Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, and so he - subject-verb agreement
(C) Excited about the prospects of harnessing Niagara Falls to produce electric power, Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, - Correct
(D) Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, excited about the prospects of harnessing Niagara Falls for the production of electric power and - Tesla excited is incorrect -- was is needed
(E) The inventor of alternating current, excited with the prospects of harnessing Niagara Falls for producing of electric power, Nikola Tesla - excited with is unidiomatic ; Tesla too far from appositive -- the inventor of alternating current

Answer C
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Re: Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, because he was  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Oct 2018, 06:46
sondenso wrote:
Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, because he was excited with the prospects of harnessing Niagara Falls for producing electric power, he predicted in the mid-1890's that electricity generated at Niagara would one day power the streetcars of London and the streetlights of Paris.

(A) Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, because he was excited with the prospects of harnessing Niagara Falls for producing electric power, he

(B) The prospects of harnessing Niagara Falls to produce electric power was exciting to Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, and so he

(C) Excited about the prospects of harnessing Niagara Falls to produce electric power, Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current,

(D) Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, excited about the prospects of harnessing Niagara Falls for the production of electric power and

(E) The inventor of alternating current, excited with the prospects of harnessing Niagara Falls for producing of electric power, Nikola Tesla


HI GMATNinja , mikemcgarry , egmat , sayantanc2k, RonPurewal , DmitryFarber , MagooshExpert (Carolyn), ccooley , SarahPurewal, dave13

Can you please explain Why is D wrong in detail ? If I remove [the inventor of alternating current] Does it not make sense?
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Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, because he was  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Oct 2018, 07:13
NandishSS wrote:
sondenso wrote:
Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, because he was excited with the prospects of harnessing Niagara Falls for producing electric power, he predicted in the mid-1890's that electricity generated at Niagara would one day power the streetcars of London and the streetlights of Paris.

(A) Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, because he was excited with the prospects of harnessing Niagara Falls for producing electric power, he

(B) The prospects of harnessing Niagara Falls to produce electric power was exciting to Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, and so he

(C) Excited about the prospects of harnessing Niagara Falls to produce electric power, Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current,

(D) Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, excited about the prospects of harnessing Niagara Falls for the production of electric power and

(E) The inventor of alternating current, excited with the prospects of harnessing Niagara Falls for producing of electric power, Nikola Tesla


HI GMATNinja , mikemcgarry , egmat , sayantanc2k, RonPurewal , DmitryFarber , MagooshExpert (Carolyn), ccooley , SarahPurewal, dave13

Can you please explain Why is D wrong in detail ? If I remove [the inventor of alternating current] Does it not make sense?



hey NandishSS

I am far from being expert :) :lol: but thanks for tagging me

well let me explain, lets remove [the inventor of alternating current]

(D) Nikola Tesla, excited about the prospects of harnessing Niagara Falls for the production of electric power and predicted in the mid-1890's that electricity generated at Niagara would one day power the streetcars of London and the streetlights of Paris.

now read outloud


"excited about the prospects" is not a verb, it is adverbial participle

"predicted" is a verb

conjunction "and" doesnt make sence here.

click on the link below:

https://www.englishgrammar.org/grammar- ... rticiples/

here is an example from that link :)

Undeterred by the setbacks, she persevered. (this is correct version )

"Undeterred by the setbacks" is adverbial participle,

now let me change the sentence, i will add conjuntion "AND

Undeterred by the setbacks, and she persevered. (does this sentence make sence ?) i think no, right ? this is the sentence analogous to the D (option)

well, :) not sure if my explanation helps :) but anyway hope others reply too :)
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Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, because he was  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Oct 2018, 07:24
Quote:
hey NandishSS

I am far from being expert :) :lol: but thanks for tagging me

well let me explain, lets remove [the inventor of alternating current]

(D) Nikola Tesla, excited about the prospects of harnessing Niagara Falls for the production of electric power and predicted in the mid-1890's that electricity generated at Niagara would one day power the streetcars of London and the streetlights of Paris.

now read outloud


"excited about the prospects" is not a verb, it is adverbial participle

"predicted" is a verb

conjunction "and" doesnt make sence here.

click on the link below:

https://www.englishgrammar.org/grammar- ... rticiples/

here is an example from that link :)

Undeterred by the setbacks, she persevered. (this is correct version )

"Undeterred by the setbacks" is adverbial participle,

now let me change the sentence, i will add conjuntion "AND

Undeterred by the setbacks, and she persevered. (does this sentence make sence ?) i think no, right ? this is the sentence analogous to the D (option)

well, :) not sure if my explanation helps :) but anyway hope others reply too :)


HI dave13 ,

You are expert for me ;) :cool:

Can you please me to understand further.

What is the function of excited (Here). How to differentiate between modifier and verb? Or When it acts as Verb or modifier?
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Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, because he was  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Oct 2018, 07:38
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NandishSS ,

"Excited" is participle because it lacks helper verbs such as “is,” “was,” or “am,” if it were "is excited" then it would be verb.
So "excited" here modifies Nikola Tesla.

see below an exrtract from my post about SC tips and tricks :) https://gmatclub.com/forum/sc-tips-tric ... l#p2128902

VERBALS MUST NOT TO BE CONFUSED WITH VERBS



Verbals are not verbs. On the GMAT, it is important to recognize that the –ing form of a word, without a helper verb like “is,” “was,” or “am,” does not act as a verb. Without one of these helper verbs, the –ing form of a word, called a verbal, acts as a noun or as a modifier. If a subject corresponds to a verbal and not a verb, the sentence is a fragment.

Participial Phrases

Participial Phrases are present participles or past participles and any modifiers, objects, or complements. Participial phrases contain verbs which act as adjectives in a sentence.

Examples:

    Singing very softly, the boy lulled his baby brother to sleep. (the participial phrase works as an adjective, modifying "boy")

    The girls, frightened by the police car's headlights, quickly came down from the school's roof. (the participial phrase works as an adjective, modifying "girls")


Gerund Phrases

Gerund Phrases contain verbs ending in -ing and any modifiers, objects, or complements. Gerund phrases act as nouns in a sentence. They can act as the subject or object of a verb, as a predicate nominative, and as the object of a preposition.

Examples:

    Waiting for his grades drove him crazy. (the gerund phrase works as the subject of the verb "drove")

    The woman denied knowing her own husband. (the gerund phrase works as the object of the verb "denied")

    He thought he could escape from his problems by running away. (the gerund phrase works as the object of the preposition "by")

    Making many acquaintances is cultivating future friendships. (the gerund phrases work as the subject and as the predicate nominative)

Infinitive Phrases

Infinitive Phrases contain verbals consisting of "to" followed by a verb and any modifiers, objects, or complements. Infinitive phrases usually act as nouns, but they can also act as adjectives and adverbs.

Examples:

    To live in Boston eventually is his main goal in life. (the infinitive phrase works as the subject of the sentence)

    Quentin Tarentino loves to babble during interviews. (the infinitive phrase works as the object of the verb "loves")

    Do you have any clothes to donate to the homeless shelter? (the infinitive phrase works as an adjective, modifying "clothes")

    She went home to visit her family. (the infinitive phrase works as an adverb, modifying "went")



generis please correct me if my explanation is wrong or i am missing something :) its thanks to you that i learnt SC tips and trcks :)
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Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, because he was  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Oct 2018, 12:32
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dave13 wrote:
NandishSS

"Excited" is participle because it lacks helper verbs such as “is,” “was,” or “am,” if it were "is excited" then it would be verb.
So "excited" here modifies Nikola Tesla.

see below an exrtract from my post about SC tips and tricks :) https://gmatclub.com/forum/sc-tips-tric ... l#p2128902

VERBALS MUST NOT TO BE CONFUSED WITH VERBS

Verbals are not verbs.

Participial Phrases

Participial Phrases are present participles or past participles and any modifiers, objects, or complements. Participial phrases contain verbs which act as adjectives in a sentence.

Example:
The girls, frightened by the police car's headlights, quickly came down from the school's roof. (the participial phrase works as an adjective, modifying "girls")

generis please correct me if my explanation is wrong or i am missing something :) its thanks to you that i learnt SC tips and trcks :)

dave13 - really nice work! +1
I will add another part of speech that excited could be, and share some tests to differentiate between an adjective and a verb.

NandishSS , you asked
Quote:
What is the function of excited.

Just as dave13 said: "excited" is a participle that modifies the noun Nicola Tesla. See above: "excite" is an adjective.
This adjective tells us Tesla's state of being, about how he felt. He felt excited.

We could say also that Tesla was excited. "Excited" still describes Tesla. (As dave13 did, I will avoid the linking verb issue, except in the footnote*.)

•• There is a another possibility. Excited can be the simple past tense of excite.
The Niagara Falls project excited Nikola Tesla.

In this case, excited is an action verb. A subject does something (to someone or something). X excited Y.
Subject-Verb-Object

We do have that construction in every option for one word: he predicted [XYZ]

No option contains the S-V-O structure for excited. Highlighting any form of excite:

(A) Tesla ... was excited
(B) [ABC] ... was exciting to Tesla ...
(C) Excited about [ABC] Tesla
(D) Tesla, excited about [ABC]
(E) ... excited with [ABC]

Tesla predicted or he predicted is in every answer choice.

We need but do not have "Tesla excited ___" or "he excited ___."

Tesla himself did not excite something or someone. "Excited" cannot be a verb.

One note about (D), which may seem okay. Incorrect. A comma NEVER separates a subject and verb that are right next to each other.
She, attended the party. :(
She attended the party. :)

Tesla, excited about ABC [not a S/V] :(
Quote:
How to differentiate between modifier and verb? Or When it acts as Verb or modifier?

Certain tests can help.
Adjectives
-- can usually be preceded by VERY (verbs? No)
-- can usually be preceded by APPEARS or SEEMS [to be] (verbs? No)

Verbs
-- may be preceded by CAN ...
Exception: the verb must not be a modal verb, because CAN is a modal verb.
Adjectives? May not be preceded by CAN.

These tests work frequently but not always. If the test does not yield a clear answer immediately, try a different test.

Is EXCITED an adjective or a verb?
•• Can the word be preceded by VERY? VERY _________
If so, it is probably an adjective. It is not a verb.

Adjective - this works
Correct: very tall, very busy
Correct: Very excited about...
Correct: Tesla was VERY excited...

Verbs - this does not work
Wrong: He very walked to the store.
Wrong: Tesla very predicted that..

Excited is an adjective.
Predicted is not an adjective.

••Can the word be preceded by APPEARS or SEEMS to be?
If so, it is probably an adjective. It is not a verb.

CORRECT: He seems excited ... [about]

Wrong: He seems walked to the store.
Wrong: He seems predicted...

Excited is an adjective
Excited modifies Tesla.

Predicted is not an adjective.
Excited is an adjective.

•• Is the word able to follow the word can? CAN ___
If so, it is probably a verb and definitely not an adjective.

Testing guide for CAN
(1) If you have a participle (verbED), test exactly that word. Do not test "excite."

(2) If you are testing a verb, use only the bare infinitive.
Infinitive: to walk
Bare infinitive: walk

Wrong: He CAN excited

Correct: He CAN predict

Excited is NOT a verb. Predicted is a verb.

CONCLUSION: Excited is an adjective. Excited is not a verb.

Find a construction in which excited (an adjective) and predicted (a verb) do not have to be parallel.

That is option C.
A and B do not use excited to modify Tesla. D is not parallel and E is unidiomatic.

Past participles as adjectives are hard, especially for non-native speakers. Try the VERY, SEEMS, and CAN tests as you practice.

None of us can cover every construct that GMAT will test on a given issue.

dave13 , you wrote a good answer AND provided me with a base to which I could add what I hope are helpful notes.

Your kind of effort is helpful, generous, and right in line with one one of my favorite purposes of GMAT Club -- collaboration. :grin: :thumbup:

Hope that helps. :-)

*This construction is the same as "was excited."
As noted above, excited is still a past participle and still an adjective.
Excited is the subject complement of the linking verb seems.
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Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, because he was &nbs [#permalink] 27 Oct 2018, 12:32
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Nikola Tesla, the inventor of alternating current, because he was

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