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Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr

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Re: Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Aug 2018, 10:36
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Instead of weighing in on such idiom as "each other "

There is a definitive decision point.
GMAT DOES NOT WEIGH IN ON IDIOMS ANYMORE AS MUCH AS IT USED TO.

AN INCORRECT CHOICE IS RATHER INCORRECT FOR ONLY 2 REASONS-
MEANING OR GRAMMATICAL ERROR or both.

There is a clear decision point between A and B

Intended meaning of the sentence- in certain tribe , dance teams represent their chief at the court of another chief. They provide entertainment and in return receive some objects.


A- dance teams represent their own chief at the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for food, drink, and lodging.

Meaning- dance teams REPRESENT their own chief. Providing(verbing mod) entertainment in return for....
Here providing is in VERB-ING form supposed to work in either of the 3 ways,Viz.,

1.modifying action ( Telling "how" the action is done)
2.modifyimg action( specifying generic information )
3.RESULT OF THE ACTION.

Now the "providing " does not fit in any of the 3 modifier brakcets. It cannot be the result of the dance teams representing their chief , It cannot be the " how" or generic information because "providing " and "represent" are independent action and are stand alone.

B- the court of another and provide entertainment in return for

Meaning- here represent and provide are independently placed and hence the emphasis is put on each action equally. Dance teams do what? Represent and provide. 2 simple actions which are completely independent.

NOTE- GMAT = HOW MUCH IS GIVEN + HOW MUCH CAN I EXTRACT.
GMAT IS MORE OF A PRACTICAL EXAM THAN BASED ON SET OF RULES. THE MORE YOU GET TO KNOW HOW GMAT WORKS IS THE MORE YOU UNDERSTAND THAT RULES ARE RATHER A VERY SMALL PART OF GMAT. INDEED RULES ARE IMPORTANT TO FOLLOW BUT ONE CAN MASTER GMAT SC IF HE'S A MASTET IN UNDERSTANDING THE REAL MEANING OF EACH SENTENCE IRRESPECTIVE OF THE SECTION (RC SC CR).

TIP- READ AS MUCH AS YOU CAN. READ GMAT LIKE MATERIAL AND TRY TO UNDERSTAND EACH SENTENCE. TRUST ME.

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Re: Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Aug 2018, 07:58
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The sentence itself is convoluted you can't get the meaning if you read the sentence alone, unless you read the answer choices.
The problem is how to solve such questions when meaning is not clear from question steam and reading all choices take good 4 minutes. I think the time is main problem in questions like this. Anyone who can address this issue.
ALL Big names are invited the please offer help on the matter.
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Re: Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Aug 2018, 17:55
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alitariquet

True what you said. My stand is do not jump on the meaning straight. wait and eliminate grammar related mistakes. after this you will be left with 2-3 choices. now play with meaning.
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Re: Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Oct 2018, 07:04
hazelnut wrote:
The Official Guide for GMAT Review 2018

Practice Question
Question No.: SC 796
Page: 706

Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Africa, dance teams represent their own chief at the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for food, drink, and lodging.

(A) the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for

(B) the court of another and provide entertainment in return for

(C) the court of the other, so as to provide entertainment as a return on

(D) each other's court, entertainment being provided in return for

(E) another's court and provide entertainment as a return on

The Tsonga

(A) Pronoun / Meaning (each other)

(B) CORRECT

(C) Pronoun / Meaning (the other); Idiom (as a return on)

(D) Pronoun / Meaning (each other’s; being provided)

(E) Idiom (as a return on)


First glance

The first three choices start with the court of (someone), while the other two pull the “someone” in front of the word court. Whose court is it? Check the meaning as you read.

Issues

(1) Pronoun / Meaning: each other; the other; each other’s

The original sentence mentions the court of each other. The term each other implies that the sentence is talking about two or more people who have been previously mentioned, but the only plural grouping already mentioned is the dance teams.

Logically, the dance teams don’t have courts; rather, the chiefs do. The sentence, though, mentions only their own chief, not plural chiefs, so each other cannot refer back to the sole chief. Eliminate choices (A) and (D) for this faulty pronoun usage.

Choice (C) uses the other, indicating just one other chief. Earlier in the sentence, though, a group of tribes is mentioned, implying that there may be many other chiefs, not just one. Which is it? Eliminate choice (C) for creating ambiguity in the meaning.

(2) Idiom: as a return on
Meaning: being provided


The latter part of each answer choice changes significantly. Compare this whole “chunk” of text:

(A) …providing entertainment in return for

(B) …and provide entertainment in return for

(C) …so as to provide entertainment as a return on

(D) …entertainment being provided in return for

(E) …and provide entertainment as a return on

What jumps out at you first? There’s a choice between in return for and as a return on at the end.

Both expressions exist in the language, but they mean different things. You might do X in return for Y; that is, in exchange for you doing X, someone else did (or gave you) Y. Alternatively, you could, for example, earn X as a return on your investment in Y; that is, you invest in Y, and you gain X as your return. Which meaning matches the sentence about the Tsonga?

The Tsonga provide entertainment in exchange for food, drink, and lodging; they are not investing in something in the hopes of gaining a return. Eliminate choices (C) and (E) for using an idiom illogically in this sentence.

As you are examining this “chunk” of the sentence, you may also spot another issue. Answer (D) says entertainment being provided. Who is providing the entertainment? Presumably the visiting dance teams provide the entertainment? Or perhaps people at the other court provide entertainment for the visiting dance teams? The sentence doesn’t actually say; eliminate choice (D) for introducing ambiguity.

The Correct Answer

Correct answer (B) uses the court of another to make clear that people are visiting the court of another chief, without limiting the meaning to imply that only one other chief exists (as trap answer (C) does). The correct answer also uses the logical idiom for the intended meaning: the dance teams provide entertainment in return for certain benefits.




To all those people who are skeptical about COMMA + VERBING in option A.(excerpts from CJ)


The use of verb-ing ‘providing’ is incorrect since when ‘comma+verb-ing’ succeeds a clause, it provides either a result of the clause or how the action in the clause is performed. In this case, ‘providing entertainment…” doesn’t provide any such info. Rather, ‘providing entertainment…” provides information that is unrelated to the main clause.
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Re: Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Nov 2018, 06:57
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EMPOWERgmatVerbal wrote:
Hello Everyone!

Let's take a look at this question, one problem at a time, and determine which option is the best one! There are many ways to attack this question, but let's focus on the quickest way to get to the correct answer!

To get started, here is the original question with any major differences between each option highlighted in orange:

Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Africa, dance teams represent their own chief at the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for food, drink, and lodging.

(A) the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for
(B) the court of another and provide entertainment in return for
(C) the court of the other, so as to provide entertainment as a return on
(D) each other's court, entertainment being provided in return for
(E) another's court and provide entertainment as a return on

Right away, we can see two major differences between each option:

1. How they begin (refer to only two tribes / refer to many tribes)
2. How they end (in return for / as a return for / as a return on)

There are other differences, but these two are the easiest to spot and deal with quickly. To begin, let's tackle #1 on our list: how each option begins. The Tsonga is a group of several tribes, with each tribe having its own dance team. Each tribe is able to visit any other tribe it wants, and then provide entertainment to gain access to food, drink, and lodging.

However, some of the options below make it sound like there are only 2 tribes who send dance troupes to each other, rather than all of the tribes being able to visit any other tribe. So let's take a look at each option, and rule out any that are unclear or sound like only 2 tribes are involved:

(A) the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for
This is wrong because saying "each other" means we're only talking about 2 tribes visiting each other, instead of one tribe visiting any other tribe it wants.

(B) the court of another and provide entertainment in return for
This is okay because "another" means the dance troupe can visit any of the other troupes, not just one.

(C) the court of the other, so as to provide entertainment as a return on
This is wrong because "the other" suggests there is only one other tribe they can travel to, which isn't true.

(D) each other's court, entertainment being provided in return for
This is wrong because "each other's" suggests the 2 tribes always trade dance troupes, which isn't always the case.

(E) another's court and provide entertainment as a return on
This is okay because "another's court" means the dance troupe can visit any of the other tribes it wants, not just one.

We can eliminate options A, C, and D because they incorrectly state there are only 2 tribes involved in this behavior, not ALL of the tribes!

Now that we're left with only options B and E to choose from, let's try #2 on our list: their endings (in return for / as a return on). Whenever we talk about two people or groups exchanging something, we say:

X is doing [insert action here] in exchange for Y
OR
X is doing [insert action here] in return for Y

Let's see which of our remaining options uses this correctly:

(B) the court of another and provide entertainment in return for

This is the CORRECT answer! It's clear that we're talking about several tribes being able to visit any other tribe it wants, and it's clear that they provide entertainment in exchange for / in return for food, drink, and lodging!

(E) another's court and provide entertainment as a return on

This is INCORRECT because it says that the tribe's dance troupe provides entertainment as a return on food, drink, and lodging. This not only sounds awkward, but it also suggests that tribes provide entertainment after they've already been given food, drink, and lodging, which doesn't really make sense.

There you go - option B is the correct answer!


Don't study for the GMAT. Train for it.




This is super good..I had checked explanation at so many places but this one finally helped (say after 30 mns of research..)

Thanks :)
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Re: Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Dec 2018, 16:14
EMPOWERgmatVerbal wrote:
Hello Everyone!

Let's take a look at this question, one problem at a time, and determine which option is the best one! There are many ways to attack this question, but let's focus on the quickest way to get to the correct answer!

To get started, here is the original question with any major differences between each option highlighted in orange:

Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Africa, dance teams represent their own chief at the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for food, drink, and lodging.

(A) the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for
(B) the court of another and provide entertainment in return for
(C) the court of the other, so as to provide entertainment as a return on
(D) each other's court, entertainment being provided in return for
(E) another's court and provide entertainment as a return on

Right away, we can see two major differences between each option:

1. How they begin (refer to only two tribes / refer to many tribes)
2. How they end (in return for / as a return for / as a return on)

There are other differences, but these two are the easiest to spot and deal with quickly. To begin, let's tackle #1 on our list: how each option begins. The Tsonga is a group of several tribes, with each tribe having its own dance team. Each tribe is able to visit any other tribe it wants, and then provide entertainment to gain access to food, drink, and lodging.

However, some of the options below make it sound like there are only 2 tribes who send dance troupes to each other, rather than all of the tribes being able to visit any other tribe. So let's take a look at each option, and rule out any that are unclear or sound like only 2 tribes are involved:

(A) the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for
This is wrong because saying "each other" means we're only talking about 2 tribes visiting each other, instead of one tribe visiting any other tribe it wants.

(B) the court of another and provide entertainment in return for
This is okay because "another" means the dance troupe can visit any of the other troupes, not just one.

(C) the court of the other, so as to provide entertainment as a return on
This is wrong because "the other" suggests there is only one other tribe they can travel to, which isn't true.

(D) each other's court, entertainment being provided in return for
This is wrong because "each other's" suggests the 2 tribes always trade dance troupes, which isn't always the case.

(E) another's court and provide entertainment as a return on
This is okay because "another's court" means the dance troupe can visit any of the other tribes it wants, not just one.

We can eliminate options A, C, and D because they incorrectly state there are only 2 tribes involved in this behavior, not ALL of the tribes!

Now that we're left with only options B and E to choose from, let's try #2 on our list: their endings (in return for / as a return on). Whenever we talk about two people or groups exchanging something, we say:

X is doing [insert action here] in exchange for Y
OR
X is doing [insert action here] in return for Y

Let's see which of our remaining options uses this correctly:

(B) the court of another and provide entertainment in return for

This is the CORRECT answer! It's clear that we're talking about several tribes being able to visit any other tribe it wants, and it's clear that they provide entertainment in exchange for / in return for food, drink, and lodging!

(E) another's court and provide entertainment as a return on

This is INCORRECT because it says that the tribe's dance troupe provides entertainment as a return on food, drink, and lodging. This not only sounds awkward, but it also suggests that tribes provide entertainment after they've already been given food, drink, and lodging, which doesn't really make sense.

There you go - option B is the correct answer!


Don't study for the GMAT. Train for it.


Empower Subscriber here. Would D also be and undesirable choice because of the , +noun+verbing construction. I was thinking that this construction is not preferred on the GMAT. Can anyone clear up when we can and can't use a mid sentence -ing?
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Re: Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Dec 2018, 18:57
Without even knowing the exact meaning, I could decide on “B”. Please correct me if my reasoning is correct or made some mistake. The non-underlined portion, after “at”, should be followed by a place and hence options “D” and “E” are out. The correct idiom to use is “in return for” and hence Option “C” is out. Between “A” and “B” , obviously “B” is the clear winner because of parallelism...?

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New post 30 Jan 2019, 00:32
This one is quite tricky.

Looking through the options I can see a few ways to start eliminating options though. “as a return on” does not fit here. “as a return on “food, drink and lodging” would imply that the dancers are getting something in exchange for the food, drink and lodging, not that they were receiving them. So, C and E can be eliminated. A and D have the phrase “each other”, which also does not fit. Each other is used when a group does something collectively.

So, by PoE, the correct answer is B.
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Re: Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Apr 2019, 07:12
Quote:
Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Africa, dance teams represent their own chief at the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for food, drink, and lodging.


Hi Folks,
A subtle meaning error is whats wrong with the original sentence.
Dance teams would represent their own chief at someone else's court, not each others'.
"Return for" jumps out but its correct usage here because a favor is being returned.
With these observations, lets pick the best choice we can find.

(A) the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for

(B) the court of another and provide entertainment in return for

(C) the court of the other, so as to provide entertainment as a return on

(D) each other's court, entertainment being provided in return for

(E) another's court and provide entertainment as a return on

Since we can reject A,C,D & E on solid grounds, B is the only choice thats left and indeed its correct.
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Re: Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr  [#permalink]

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New post 10 May 2019, 00:40
1
Received a really interesting question about this one on our Ask Me Anything About SC thread, and figured I'd post it here, just in case it helps anybody:

Quote:
Could you please help me explain more the usage of "each other", "another" and "the other" in this official question?

Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Africa, dance teams represent their own chief at the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for food, drink, and lodging.
(A) the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for
(B) the court of another and provide entertainment in return for
(C) the court of the other, so as to provide entertainment as a return on

I have read the OG explanation, as well as explanation for this question from this thread https://gmatclub.com/forum/among-the-ts ... 41546.html but I'm not quite sure whether I understand exactly their difference.

Here is what I think:

1. There are only 2 definite objects or people in a group. If 1 object is already mentioned, "the other" will be used to refer to the second object. On the other hand, when there are more than 2 objects, "another" will be used to refer to any other objects in this group.

2. "each other" is used when there are at least 2 objects or people in a group.
For example:
My friend, Nicole and I exchanged gifts with each other last Christmas
Our group exchanged gifts with each other last Christmas
However, I can't distinguish between the usage of "each other" and "another" because it seems to me that "another" can be used to replace "each other" in "our group" example above

Please correct me. Thank you very much!

I'm not sure that you’ll ever see this particular issue again in an actual GMAT question, but it’s oddly interesting. My first instinct was that your explanations were spot-on, and it took me a while to figure out what was missing.

You’re right that the term “each other” would be used when there are at least 2 objects or people in a group. But the thing you’re missing is that “each other” suggests that everybody in the group is performing the same, reciprocal action. Using your examples:

    “My friend, Nicole and I exchanged gifts with each other last Christmas.” – You and Nicole BOTH perform the action of exchanging gifts.
    “[Everybody in] our group exchanged gifts with each other last Christmas.” – EVERYBODY in the group performs the action of exchanging gifts.

Back to answer choice (A) from the OG question:

Quote:
Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Africa, dance teams represent their own chief at the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for food, drink, and lodging.
(A) the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for
(B) the court of another and provide entertainment in return for
(C) the court of the other, so as to provide entertainment as a return on

(A) doesn’t quite make sense. “Each other” has to refer to “dance teams”, right? So then the sentence seems to say that dance teams represent their own chief at the court of other dance teams. And that’s pretty weird: have you ever heard of a dance team with its own royal court?

(Speaking as a veteran of quite a few dance companies: we were lucky if the dance company had its own dressing room, let alone a royal court. Once, I had to change costumes 17 times during a single show – and had to do the costume changes in a hallway. I am not making this up. There were also some very interesting wardrobe malfunctions on opening night, but you really don't want to hear about my accidental moments of near-nudity in front of live audiences…)

Anyway, (B) seems clearer: “another” can now refer to a chief, instead of a dance team. So now that makes sense: “dance teams represent their own chief at the court of another chief.” Nice.

And (C) is odd, too: “the other” suggests that there’s only one other chief, or one other dance team. Neither of those quite work: “dance teams represent their own chief at the court of the other chief…”? Which other chief? Or if it’s “dance teams represent their own chief at the court of the other dance team”, that’s still weird: which other dance team are we talking about?

So for that reason, (B) seems to be the best of the three.

I hope this helps!
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Re: Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr  [#permalink]

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New post 21 May 2019, 01:27
EMPOWERgmatVerbal wrote:
Hello Everyone!

Let's take a look at this question, one problem at a time, and determine which option is the best one! There are many ways to attack this question, but let's focus on the quickest way to get to the correct answer!

To get started, here is the original question with any major differences between each option highlighted in orange:

Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Africa, dance teams represent their own chief at the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for food, drink, and lodging.

(A) the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for
(B) the court of another and provide entertainment in return for
(C) the court of the other, so as to provide entertainment as a return on
(D) each other's court, entertainment being provided in return for
(E) another's court and provide entertainment as a return on

Right away, we can see two major differences between each option:

1. How they begin (refer to only two tribes / refer to many tribes)
2. How they end (in return for / as a return for / as a return on)

There are other differences, but these two are the easiest to spot and deal with quickly. To begin, let's tackle #1 on our list: how each option begins. The Tsonga is a group of several tribes, with each tribe having its own dance team. Each tribe is able to visit any other tribe it wants, and then provide entertainment to gain access to food, drink, and lodging.

However, some of the options below make it sound like there are only 2 tribes who send dance troupes to each other, rather than all of the tribes being able to visit any other tribe. So let's take a look at each option, and rule out any that are unclear or sound like only 2 tribes are involved:

(A) the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for
This is wrong because saying "each other" means we're only talking about 2 tribes visiting each other, instead of one tribe visiting any other tribe it wants.

(B) the court of another and provide entertainment in return for
This is okay because "another" means the dance troupe can visit any of the other troupes, not just one.

(C) the court of the other, so as to provide entertainment as a return on
This is wrong because "the other" suggests there is only one other tribe they can travel to, which isn't true.

(D) each other's court, entertainment being provided in return for
This is wrong because "each other's" suggests the 2 tribes always trade dance troupes, which isn't always the case.

(E) another's court and provide entertainment as a return on
This is okay because "another's court" means the dance troupe can visit any of the other tribes it wants, not just one.

We can eliminate options A, C, and D because they incorrectly state there are only 2 tribes involved in this behavior, not ALL of the tribes!

Now that we're left with only options B and E to choose from, let's try #2 on our list: their endings (in return for / as a return on). Whenever we talk about two people or groups exchanging something, we say:

X is doing [insert action here] in exchange for Y
OR
X is doing [insert action here] in return for Y

Let's see which of our remaining options uses this correctly:

(B) the court of another and provide entertainment in return for

This is the CORRECT answer! It's clear that we're talking about several tribes being able to visit any other tribe it wants, and it's clear that they provide entertainment in exchange for / in return for food, drink, and lodging!

(E) another's court and provide entertainment as a return on

This is INCORRECT because it says that the tribe's dance troupe provides entertainment as a return on food, drink, and lodging. This not only sounds awkward, but it also suggests that tribes provide entertainment after they've already been given food, drink, and lodging, which doesn't really make sense.

There you go - option B is the correct answer!


Don't study for the GMAT. Train for it.


thanks for the explanation. But I've once seen an example sentence on Manhattan SC prep: These groups often INTERACT WITH ONE ANOTHER (or EACH OTHER). Doesn't it mean that "each other" can be used to indicate more than 2 group members?
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Re: Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr  [#permalink]

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New post 21 May 2019, 01:33
Can each other refer to "tribes" rather than "dance teams"? "A tribe has a court" sounds reasonable...
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Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr  [#permalink]

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New post 21 May 2019, 19:04
pollymonkey wrote:
Can each other refer to "tribes" rather than "dance teams"? "A tribe has a court" sounds reasonable...
Not in this case. Read just the part that has "each other's":

Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Africa, dance teams represent their own chief at each other's court...
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Re: Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr  [#permalink]

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New post 22 May 2019, 10:15
pollymonkey wrote:
EMPOWERgmatVerbal wrote:
Hello Everyone!

Let's take a look at this question, one problem at a time, and determine which option is the best one! There are many ways to attack this question, but let's focus on the quickest way to get to the correct answer!

To get started, here is the original question with any major differences between each option highlighted in orange:

Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Africa, dance teams represent their own chief at the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for food, drink, and lodging.

(A) the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for
(B) the court of another and provide entertainment in return for
(C) the court of the other, so as to provide entertainment as a return on
(D) each other's court, entertainment being provided in return for
(E) another's court and provide entertainment as a return on

Right away, we can see two major differences between each option:

1. How they begin (refer to only two tribes / refer to many tribes)
2. How they end (in return for / as a return for / as a return on)

There are other differences, but these two are the easiest to spot and deal with quickly. To begin, let's tackle #1 on our list: how each option begins. The Tsonga is a group of several tribes, with each tribe having its own dance team. Each tribe is able to visit any other tribe it wants, and then provide entertainment to gain access to food, drink, and lodging.

However, some of the options below make it sound like there are only 2 tribes who send dance troupes to each other, rather than all of the tribes being able to visit any other tribe. So let's take a look at each option, and rule out any that are unclear or sound like only 2 tribes are involved:

(A) the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for
This is wrong because saying "each other" means we're only talking about 2 tribes visiting each other, instead of one tribe visiting any other tribe it wants.

(B) the court of another and provide entertainment in return for
This is okay because "another" means the dance troupe can visit any of the other troupes, not just one.

(C) the court of the other, so as to provide entertainment as a return on
This is wrong because "the other" suggests there is only one other tribe they can travel to, which isn't true.

(D) each other's court, entertainment being provided in return for
This is wrong because "each other's" suggests the 2 tribes always trade dance troupes, which isn't always the case.

(E) another's court and provide entertainment as a return on
This is okay because "another's court" means the dance troupe can visit any of the other tribes it wants, not just one.

We can eliminate options A, C, and D because they incorrectly state there are only 2 tribes involved in this behavior, not ALL of the tribes!

Now that we're left with only options B and E to choose from, let's try #2 on our list: their endings (in return for / as a return on). Whenever we talk about two people or groups exchanging something, we say:

X is doing [insert action here] in exchange for Y
OR
X is doing [insert action here] in return for Y

Let's see which of our remaining options uses this correctly:

(B) the court of another and provide entertainment in return for

This is the CORRECT answer! It's clear that we're talking about several tribes being able to visit any other tribe it wants, and it's clear that they provide entertainment in exchange for / in return for food, drink, and lodging!

(E) another's court and provide entertainment as a return on

This is INCORRECT because it says that the tribe's dance troupe provides entertainment as a return on food, drink, and lodging. This not only sounds awkward, but it also suggests that tribes provide entertainment after they've already been given food, drink, and lodging, which doesn't really make sense.

There you go - option B is the correct answer!


Don't study for the GMAT. Train for it.


thanks for the explanation. But I've once seen an example sentence on Manhattan SC prep: These groups often INTERACT WITH ONE ANOTHER (or EACH OTHER). Doesn't it mean that "each other" can be used to indicate more than 2 group members?


Thanks for your question pollymonkey!

This depends on the context. In this case, there is a distinction between saying how the dance troupes interatct with each other:

the court of each other / each other's court / the court of the other = suggests we're only talking about 2 courts trading dance troupes, instead of all the dance troupes visiting any of the others

the court of another / another's court = suggests that a dance troupe can visit any of the other courts in the tribe

None of the options here use the phrase "one another," so that doesn't really apply here. You can absolutely use "each other" and "one another" interchangeably in the example you gave, but this GMAT question doesn't ask you to choose between "each other" and "one another" - it asks you to choose between "each other" and "another's/of another."

I hope that helps!
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Re: Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr   [#permalink] 22 May 2019, 10:15

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