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Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr

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Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr [#permalink]

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New post 29 May 2017, 19:32
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The Official Guide for GMAT Review 2018

Practice Question
Question No.: SC 796
Page: 706

Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Africa, dance teams represent their own chief at the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for food, drink, and lodging.

(A) the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for
(B) the court of another and provide entertainment in return for
(C) the court of the other, so as to provide entertainment as a return on
(D) each other's court, entertainment being provided in return for
(E) another's court and provide entertainment as a return on

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Re: Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr [#permalink]

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New post 29 May 2017, 20:31
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This was pretty tricky. B is the best answer.

C and E contain the unidiomatic "as a return on."

A and D contain "each other," which is awkward in this sentence. Why? Well, we don't know how many chiefs are involved here. When there are multiple entities, I believe it's better to use "one another." In either case, you would need to use "courts," though, instead of the singular "court." For instance, you would say, "Ginger and Mary Ann wore each other's hats" rather than "Ginger and Mary Ann wore each other's hat," because there would be at least two hats involved.

B uses "the court of another [chief]," making it clear that only 2 chiefs are being referred to, and is pretty straightforward.
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Re: Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr [#permalink]

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New post 29 May 2017, 22:22
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Dear expert GMATNinja, can you please elaborate on how to decide between (A) and (B)? In other words, how does "each other" differ from "another" in this sentence?
Thank you.
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Re: Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr [#permalink]

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New post 30 May 2017, 01:37
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Lucy Phuong wrote:
Dear expert GMATNinja, can you please elaborate on how to decide between (A) and (B)? In other words, how does "each other" differ from "another" in this sentence?
Thank you.


I think the main difference between A and B is in how the sentence is written.
providing entertainment in return for food, drink, and lodging.
this seems to modify the preceding clause when clearly the intent is to specify an action that the dance tribes did in return for hosting them.
the way the sentence is written simple says that dance tribes will do that anyways . Verb-ing clauses are used to express the result of the preceding action or present additional information.
IMO this is not right. Hence B is the right choice.
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Re: Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr [#permalink]

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New post 30 May 2017, 02:48
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Lucy Phuong wrote:
Dear expert GMATNinja, can you please elaborate on how to decide between (A) and (B)? In other words, how does "each other" differ from "another" in this sentence?
Thank you.


"Each Other" is used when the whole group performs an act mutually.
The attendants shook hands with each other...... "The attendants" is a group.

"Another" is used when an individual/individuals of the group is/are referred to.
The captain shook hands with another (captain)... "The captain" is an individual.

Here you would notice that an individual is referred to, not a group: "their chief" is an individual. Hence "another" is correct. The intended meaning is:
The dance teams represented their own chief in the court of another chief.

Hence B is correct.
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Re: Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 31 May 2017, 09:09
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sayantanc2k wrote:
Lucy Phuong wrote:
Dear expert GMATNinja, can you please elaborate on how to decide between (A) and (B)? In other words, how does "each other" differ from "another" in this sentence?
Thank you.


"Each Other" is used when the whole group performs an act mutually.
The attendants shook hands with each other...... "The attendants" is a group.

"Another" is used when an individual/individuals of the group is/are referred to.
The captain shook hands with another (captain)... "The captain" is an individual.

Here you would notice that an individual is referred to, not a group: "their chief" is an individual. Hence "another" is correct. The intended meaning is:
The dance teams represented their own chief in the court of another chief.

Hence B is correct.


Very nice explanation, expert sayantanc2k. +1 kudos to you.

What happened to me is that initially I thought "another"/"each other" refered to [another/ each other dance team]. That's why I was confused between A and B. I think the reason might be I don't understand intended meaning of the sentence. To speak explicitly, I don't understand meaning of "in the court of", thus not knowing that it should take "chief", rather than "dance teams" as its object.

Could you help explain this phrase? Thank you.

Originally posted by Lucy Phuong on 30 May 2017, 06:01.
Last edited by Lucy Phuong on 31 May 2017, 09:09, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr [#permalink]

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New post 30 May 2017, 12:45
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Lucy Phuong wrote:
What happened to me is that initially I thought "another"/"each other" refered to [another/ each other dance team]. That's why I was confused between A and B. I think the reason might be I don't understand intended meaning of the sentence. To speak explicitly, I don't understand meaning of "in the court of", thus not knowing that it should take "chief", rather than "dance teams" as its object.

Could me help explain this phrase? Thank you.


It's a goofy sentence, but that's the GMAT for you. ;) Basically, the sentence is stating that multiple dance teams represent each chief. But is that really the intended meaning? It makes more sense that only one dance team would represent each chief. So, I think it would be clearer if the sentence read: "a dance team represents its own chief at the court of another" or else "dance teams represent their own chiefs at the courts of other chiefs."
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Re: Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr [#permalink]

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New post 31 May 2017, 09:19
neptune28 wrote:
Lucy Phuong wrote:
What happened to me is that initially I thought "another"/"each other" refered to [another/ each other dance team]. That's why I was confused between A and B. I think the reason might be I don't understand intended meaning of the sentence. To speak explicitly, I don't understand meaning of "in the court of", thus not knowing that it should take "chief", rather than "dance teams" as its object.

Could me help explain this phrase? Thank you.


It's a goofy sentence, but that's the GMAT for you. ;) Basically, the sentence is stating that multiple dance teams represent each chief. But is that really the intended meaning? It makes more sense that only one dance team would represent each chief. So, I think it would be clearer if the sentence read: "a dance team represents its own chief at the court of another" or else "dance teams represent their own chiefs at the courts of other chiefs."


Thanks. +1kudos
Yea the point is that if I had known that "in the court of + .... [chief]" (instead of "in the court of .... [dance teams]", then I would have chosen "another". The core reason is still what is the meaning of "in the court of"??? Can you tell me the phrase's meaning? neptune28. Thanks!
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Re: Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jun 2017, 16:31
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neptune28 wrote:
It's a goofy sentence, but that's the GMAT for you.

Agreed!

Lucy Phuong wrote:
Yea the point is that if I had known that "in the court of + .... [chief]" (instead of "in the court of .... [dance teams]", then I would have chosen "another". The core reason is still what is the meaning of "in the court of"??? Can you tell me the phrase's meaning? neptune28. Thanks!

I'm probably too late to be useful here, @Lucy_Phuong, but "court" here refers to the domain of a king or chief or other ruler. So in (B), "dance teams represent their own chief in the court of another" means that the dance teams are going to another chief's... "kingdom", I guess, in exchange for food and lodging.

And if it helps at all, I can't think of a single official GMAT question that mentions the courts of chiefs, so don't lose too much sleep over the vocabulary here. :)
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Re: Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jul 2017, 23:17
option A & B both are correct grammatically any meaning wise, though, meaning differs.Here is my analysis

Option A - dance teams represent their chief at the court of other dance teams in order to perform in return for food etc

option B says- dance teams do 2 things: represent their chief at the court of another chief and perform in return for food etc

Kindly let me know why we are choosing B over A
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Re: Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr [#permalink]

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New post 09 Aug 2017, 23:04
sayantanc2k wrote:
Lucy Phuong wrote:
Dear expert GMATNinja, can you please elaborate on how to decide between (A) and (B)? In other words, how does "each other" differ from "another" in this sentence?
Thank you.


"Each Other" is used when the whole group performs an act mutually.
The attendants shook hands with each other...... "The attendants" is a group.

"Another" is used when an individual/individuals of the group is/are referred to.
The captain shook hands with another (captain)... "The captain" is an individual.

Here you would notice that an individual is referred to, not a group: "their chief" is an individual. Hence "another" is correct. The intended meaning is:
The dance teams represented their own chief in the court of another chief.

Hence B is correct.


Isnt 'another' quite vague? Shouldnt 'other' be better suited for referring to the dance team? Thanks.
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Re: Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr [#permalink]

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New post 07 Sep 2017, 07:27
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OreoShake wrote:
sayantanc2k wrote:
Lucy Phuong wrote:
Dear expert GMATNinja, can you please elaborate on how to decide between (A) and (B)? In other words, how does "each other" differ from "another" in this sentence?
Thank you.


"Each Other" is used when the whole group performs an act mutually.
The attendants shook hands with each other...... "The attendants" is a group.

"Another" is used when an individual/individuals of the group is/are referred to.
The captain shook hands with another (captain)... "The captain" is an individual.

Here you would notice that an individual is referred to, not a group: "their chief" is an individual. Hence "another" is correct. The intended meaning is:
The dance teams represented their own chief in the court of another chief.

Hence B is correct.


Isnt 'another' quite vague? Shouldnt 'other' be better suited for referring to the dance team? Thanks.


"Another" literally is the word "other" with an indefinite preposition "an" before, i.e. "an + other". Here including the indefinite preposition "an" is preferred since the other team is not a definite one. Hence "another" is better than just "other".
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Re: Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr [#permalink]

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New post 08 Sep 2017, 12:37
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Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Africa, dance teams represent their own chief at the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for food, drink, and lodging.

(A) the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for
- ", providing" sets up a modifier. In other words, "represent" would be the major action/verb here, and "providing..." would be subordinate. This is incorrect.

(B) the court of another and provide entertainment in return for
- the dance teams do 2 things: 1) represent their own chief; and 2) provide entertainment

(C) the court of the other, so as to provide entertainment as a return on
- "return on" is incorrect. should be "in return for"

(D) each other's court, entertainment being provided in return for
- "being" in the middle of the sentence makes it awkward and shows poor sentence construction.

(E) another's court and provide entertainment as a return on
- same as "C"

Kudos please if helpful :)
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Re: Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr [#permalink]

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New post 15 Sep 2017, 04:08
I will go for B because 'each other' in option A would include itself too but as per the meaning of the sentence it should be 'another'.
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Re: Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr [#permalink]

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New post 26 Oct 2017, 02:30
hazelnut wrote:
Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Africa, dance teams represent their own chief at the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for food, drink, and lodging.

(A) the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for
(B) the court of another and provide entertainment in return for
(C) the court of the other, so as to provide entertainment as a return on
(D) each other's court, entertainment being provided in return for
(E) another's court and provide entertainment as a return on


Hi

Even If we are confused in the first part, before comma, of underlined options and are unable to find the correct version ... we can still use other things to find the answer

1. There should be //ism since dance team does 2 things as intended from meaning : represent and provide
Search for this and we would get Option B and E.

2. The proper use of RETURN here is : WE GET SOMETHING IN RETURN FOR SOMETHING and not AS A RETURN ON
dancers got food...in return for entertainment...so between B and E...and is B

Hope this helps

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Re: Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr [#permalink]

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New post 19 Apr 2018, 06:28
Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Africa, dance teams represent their own chief at the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for food, drink, and lodging.

(A) the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for
(B) the court of another and provide entertainment in return for
(C) the court of the others, so as to provide entertainment as a return on
(D) each other's court, entertainment being provided in return for
(E) another's court and provide entertainment as a return on


Let’s look at options A and D
the court of each other [D: each other's court], providing entertainment in return for [D: entertainment being provided in return for; this is passive voice]
Between A and D – A is preferred

(A) the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for
(B) the court of another and provide entertainment in return for
(C) the court of the others, so as to provide entertainment as a return on
(D) each other's court, entertainment being provided in return for
(E) another's court and provide entertainment as a return on

Let’s look at option C
the court of the others, so as to provide entertainment as a return on

so as to (used for showing intention or purpose); while the intention is to get food in return
correct version should be
the court of the others, so as to get food in return of entertainment
this eliminates C
IMP: USE just ‘to’ in place of ‘so as to’
IMP: DON’T USE ‘to’ in place of ‘so + adverb/adjective + as to’
Also, this option has ‘a return on’ phrasing, which is wrong discussed below.

(A) the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for
(B) the court of another and provide entertainment in return for
(C) the court of the others, so as to provide entertainment as a return on
(D) each other's court, entertainment being provided in return for

(E) another's court and provide entertainment as a return on

Let’s look at option E
another's court and provide entertainment as a return on

‘in return for X’ and ‘a return on X’ mean different
He lends in return for interest and original principal amount
He earns interest as a return on original principal amount

(A) the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for
(B) the court of another and provide entertainment in return for
(C) the court of the others, so as to provide entertainment as a return on
(D) each other's court, entertainment being provided in return for
(E) another's court and provide entertainment as a return on

Now between A and B

(A) the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for

providing entertainment – means the teams (dance teams) are providing entertainment

see this

The dance performed in the competition, providing entertainment in return for some prize (cash prize)

This is typical modifier question type situation --- can in the above sentence, the verb+ing modifier is a result of the preceding clause – performance leads to providing entertainment
Which is very correct

But our situation is different

Presenting the chief --- leads to --- providing entertainment
I don’t think

Author wants to say two events happen in parallel
The team teams present the chief and provide entertainment




(B) the court of another and provide entertainment in return for

Is better than A abased on the above

The quick feedback in that

When to select a modifier clause (the verb+ing clause is a result of the preceding clause) vs. a parallel clause (two events are parallel and independent)

Finally,

(A) the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for
(B) the court of another and provide entertainment in return for
(C) the court of the others, so as to provide entertainment as a return on
(D) each other's court, entertainment being provided in return for
(E) another's court and provide entertainment as a return on



Final NOTE:

At the courts of each other
At the court of another
At the courts of others

Other/others is always plural
Another (another, one additional, one more) is singular

This also makes B correct
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Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr [#permalink]

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New post 22 Apr 2018, 03:57
Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Africa, dance teams represent their own chief at the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for food, drink, and lodging.[/quote]

We need "return for", and not "return on". C and E are out.

"represent X and provide Y" are parallel.

We need "another and not "each other" to show that we are dealing with two different groups.


(A) the court of each other, providing entertainment in return for

(B) the court of another and provide entertainment in return for

(C) the court of the other, so as to provide entertainment as a return on

(D) each other's court, entertainment being provided in return for

(E) another's court and provide entertainment as a return on
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Re: Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr [#permalink]

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New post 08 May 2018, 06:57
Besides the use of "each other", what wrong with saying "providing entertainment in return for food, drink, and lodging" in (A)?
Providing entertainment ... the dance team represent their own chief
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Re: Among the Tsonga, a Bantu-speaking group of tribes in southeastern Afr [#permalink]

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New post 08 May 2018, 07:28
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lary301254M7 wrote:
Besides the use of "each other", what wrong with saying "providing entertainment in return for food, drink, and lodging" in (A)?
Providing entertainment ... the dance team represent their own chief

When you are saying "providing entertainment in return for food, drink, and lodging." this is a verb-ing modifies .It is after a ',' . So it is modifying prior sentence. Look at the verb of that part. its 'represent'. Lets figure out the meaning now. you are actually saying just by representing they are providing entertainment. Only this much is wrong about this sentence. :D

As I saw 'and' in B, i figured out the parallelism in it and there you go. B is the correct choice. Hope it helped.
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