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Kudzu, an Asian vine that has grown rampantly in the southern United S

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Re: Kudzu, an Asian vine that has grown rampantly in the southern United S  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Mar 2018, 06:11
Can you please explain why B is incorrect ?
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Re: Kudzu, an Asian vine that has grown rampantly in the southern United S  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Mar 2018, 06:21
ran787 wrote:
Can you please explain why B is incorrect ?

Hi ran787, not sure if you read my post just above yours.

B uses for thwarting, whereas to thwart is preferable when intent needs to be depicted.

Also, B uses a comma before since, distorting the meaning.
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Re: Kudzu, an Asian vine that has grown rampantly in the southern United S  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Mar 2018, 01:49
In this question if I am not wrong
1) I think choice B and c are both run on sentences, don't we need a FANBOY conjunction or
a ; with the last part of the sentence starting with has
2) While in choice E 1st part is a modifier, followed by a subordinate clause, connected with an independent clause with verb has and its subject in the beginning .
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Re: Kudzu, an Asian vine that has grown rampantly in the southern United S  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Mar 2018, 07:28
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kunalkhanna wrote:
In this question if I am not wrong
1) I think choice B and c are both run on sentences, don't we need a FANBOY conjunction or
a ; with the last part of the sentence starting with has

Hi Kunal, a run-on sentence is when two Independent clauses are connected by a comma. In both B and C, there is only one Independent clause:

Kudzu has overrun many houses and countless acres of roadside.

p.s. Our book EducationAisle Sentence Correction Nirvana discusses run-on sentence, its application and examples in significant detail. If someone is interested, PM me your email-id; I can mail the corresponding section.
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Re: Kudzu, an Asian vine that has grown rampantly in the southern United S  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Aug 2018, 01:33
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(A) that has grown rampantly in the southern United States since introducing it in the 1920s to thwart - we do not need -ly here
(B) that has grown rampantly in the southern United States, since it was introduced in the 1920s for thwarting - same as A
(C) that has grown rampant in the southern United States since it was introduced in the 1920s to thwart - good
(D) growing rampant in the southern United States since introducing it in the 1920s for thwarting - it was introduced to do some task - we need preposition to not for
(E) growing rampantly in the southern United States, since it was introduced in the 1920s to thwart - same as A

I go with C
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Re: Kudzu, an Asian vine that has grown rampantly in the southern United S  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Dec 2018, 16:16
I believe "rampant" and "rampantly" change the meaning of the clause, but ultimate have the same effect.
"An Asian vine that has grown rampant" --> An Asian vine has become rampant. --> The vine is everywhere.
"An Asian vine that has grown rampantly" --> An Asian vine that has spread rapidly. --> The vine is everywhere.

(A)
"since introducing it..." looks like the start of a non-finite clause, which means that what we might be saying is "[An Asian vine] has grown rampantly in the southern United States since [the Asian vine was] introducing it in the 1920s to thwart soil erosion". The subject of our non-finite clause become "An Asian vine".
If we knew with 100% certainty that "since" was being used as a preposition here, then I think this option would be fine. But because we can't know with 100% certainty, this option can be misinterpreted.
Thus, we can rule this out

(B)
The comma makes the sentence much more ambiguous. We know that the "since" clause is a subordinate of "An Asian vine" clause, but our readers may not. With the comma, the "since" clause could potentially be mistaken as a subordinate of the main "Kudzu" clause. We don't need commas for subordinate clauses, so we might as well leave this one out as it makes the sentence clearer.
We can rule this out

(C)
Nothing wrong here

(D)
Same problem with (A)
We can rule this out

(E)
Same problem with (B)
We can rule this out
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Re: Kudzu, an Asian vine that has grown rampantly in the southern United S  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Jan 2019, 09:50
Can anyone also shed light if this question also has a tad degree of Parallelism involved?

For instance, Option B and E, growing and thwart. Thwarting and grown.
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Re: Kudzu, an Asian vine that has grown rampantly in the southern United S  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Feb 2019, 20:26
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techiesam wrote:
Apart from the "for thwarting " error in option B,is the first part in option B is a run on as it was separated by a comma or if not is it right to put comma before since in the dependent clause?


I think there is a run on sentence in option B

An Asian vine that has grown rampantly in the southern United States =>"Asian vine"is the subject and "has" is a verb and it expresses a complete thought.
Since it was introduced in the 1920 for thwarting soil erosion => "it" is the subject which refers to Kudzu and "was" is the verb and it also expresses a complete thought.

Even if we consider "Since" as a dependent marker and 2nd clause as dependent clause. What is the intent of the OG Explanations "The adverbial Clause Since it was introduced in the 1920 should not be set off from has grown rampantly"



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Kudzu, an Asian vine that has grown rampantly in the southern United S  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Feb 2019, 00:16
Smitc007 wrote:
I think there is a run on sentence in option B

An Asian vine that has grown rampantly in the southern United States =>"Asian vine"is the subject and "has" is a verb and it expresses a complete thought.
Since it was introduced in the 1920 for thwarting soil erosion => "it" is the subject which refers to Kudzu and "was" is the verb and it also expresses a complete thought.

Hi Smitc007, we can't just selectively do cherry picking of words, to concoct an Independent clause. has is not the verb for Asian vine. has is the verb for that.

So, basically that has grown rampantly in the southern United States is the dependent clause in this sentence.

p.s. Our book EducationAisle Sentence Correction Nirvana discusses run-on sentence, its application and examples in significant detail. If someone is interested, PM me your email-id; I can mail the corresponding section.
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Re: Kudzu, an Asian vine that has grown rampantly in the southern United S  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Feb 2019, 00:48
hazelnut wrote:
ziyuen wrote:
The Official Guide for GMAT Verbal Review 2018

Practice Question
Question No.: SC 267
Page: 321

Kudzu, an Asian vine that has grown rampantly in the southern United States since introducing it in the 1920s to thwart soil erosion, has overrun many houses and countless acres of roadside.

(A) that has grown rampantly in the southern United States since introducing it in the 1920s to thwart
(B) that has grown rampantly in the southern United States, since it was introduced in the 1920s for thwarting
(C) that has grown rampant in the southern United States since it was introduced in the 1920s to thwart
(D) growing rampant in the southern United States since introducing it in the 1920s for thwarting
(E) growing rampantly in the southern United States, since it was introduced in the 1920s to thwart


Notice that adverb "rampantly" versus adjective "rampant".

but that's exactly what rempant describes here, how it grew. It grows rampantly. I don't get it since this seems to be a typical case for adverb? We describe a verb. He runs quickly, It grows rampantly?!

Adjectives are fine "Your son has grown so tall!".

We use an adverb if we're describing HOW he's growing.

We use an adjective if we're describing what he has grown INTO or become.
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Re: Kudzu, an Asian vine that has grown rampantly in the southern United S  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Feb 2019, 21:59
choice E has 3 error
first, because "since" appears, we need to use present perfect not doing. we can not writh other way because time indicator dicide the tense of the sentence
second, 'rampant" is righ, and "rampantly" is wrong. link verbs can go with adjective
third, there is comma before "since..." so, "since..." clause now modifies the main clause, but not "growing". this is illogic.
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Re: Kudzu, an Asian vine that has grown rampantly in the southern United S  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Mar 2019, 06:17
Quote:
I think there is a run on sentence in option B

An Asian vine that has grown rampantly in the southern United States =>"Asian vine"is the subject and "has" is a verb and it expresses a complete thought.
Since it was introduced in the 1920 for thwarting soil erosion => "it" is the subject which refers to Kudzu and "was" is the verb and it also expresses a complete thought

As EducationAisle notes, there's no run-on in (B), because "that has grown rampantly in the southern United States" isn't independent - it's a modifier describing the Asian vine. Take a simple example: "Dan, who runs a mile in fifteen minutes, is not a great athlete." Here we do have two clauses, but the one in red functions as a modifier, and so it's not independent. In the OG question, "that has grown" is part of a modifier describing the vine. If there's only one independent clause, we don't have a run-on.

Quote:
Even if we consider "Since" as a dependent marker and 2nd clause as dependent clause. What is the intent of the OG Explanations "The adverbial Clause Since it was introduced in the 1920 should not be set off from has grown rampantly"
There are two ways to understand the OG's point. First, if we have a long modifier, and within this modifier we get additional information about when an action takes place, we typically won't use a comma between action and time-modifier.

For example, "My child, who has been screaming since she awoke at 3AM, supposedly has many positive qualities." Notice that the blue component is one long modifier describing "my child," and there's no need, within the modifier, to separate the action ("has been screaming") from the description of when the action takes place ("since she awoke"). Similarly, in (C) "that has grown rampant in the southern United States since it was introduced in the 1920s to thwart soil erosion" is one long essential modifier describing the "Asian vine." "Since it was introduced" tells us when the rampant growth started.

Second, the word "since" is tricky because it has two meanings. In both the official question and in my example above, it means "from the time when." But it can also mean "because."

Watch what happens if I insert a comma before "since" in the previous example: "...who has been screaming, since she awoke at 3AM." Now it sounds as though the kid has been screaming because she awoke at 3AM, rather than indicating the timeframe of her meltdown. The same thing happens in (B): "that has grown rampantly in the southern United States, since it was introduced in the 1920s." The growth happened because it was introduced in the 1920's? It makes sense to say that the 1920's marks the time when growth became rampant; it makes less sense to claim that the plant has grown wildly because it was introduced in this decade. So the version without the comma is more logical.

I hope that helps!
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Re: Kudzu, an Asian vine that has grown rampantly in the southern United S  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Apr 2019, 09:47
Is this correct- " Kuduzu, an Asian vine growing rampant in the southern United States since it was introduced in the 1920s to thwart soil erosion, has over-run many houses and countless acres of roadside." ?
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Re: Kudzu, an Asian vine that has grown rampantly in the southern United S   [#permalink] 30 Apr 2019, 09:47

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