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Elizabeth Barber, the author of both Prehistoric Textiles, a comprehen

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Elizabeth Barber, the author of both Prehistoric Textiles, a comprehen  [#permalink]

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Elizabeth Barber, the author of both Prehistoric Textiles, a comprehensive work on cloth in the early cultures of the Mediterranean, and also of Women's Work, a more general account of early cloth manufacture, is an expert authority on textiles in ancient societies.


(A) also of Women's Work, a more general account of early cloth manufacture, is an expert authority on

(B) also Women's Work, a more general account of cloth manufacture, is an expert authority about

(C) of Women's Work, a more general account about early cloth manufacture, is an authority on

(D) of Women's Work, a more general account about early cloth manufacture, is an expert authority about

(E) Women's Work, a more general account of early cloth manufacture, is an authority on


Verbal Question of The Day: Day 29: Sentence Correction


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Originally posted by betterscore on 03 Aug 2012, 17:25.
Last edited by Bunuel on 16 Oct 2018, 05:28, edited 7 times in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
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Re: Elizabeth Barber, the author of both Prehistoric Textiles, a comprehen  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Aug 2012, 17:41
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A quick way to get at this one is to notice the 'Both A and B' idiom. Because the structure of the sentence is 'both Prehistoric Textiles...and B' that the only noun phrase that follows the and is in (E), with Women's Work. And just like that we have arrived at the answer :).
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Re: Elizabeth Barber, the author of both Prehistoric Textiles, a comprehen  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jun 2017, 12:01
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Good to see that this one isn't causing much trouble! Part of why we chose this question is that it's another great example of an official GMAT question with a pair of idiom "splits." It looks like you have to choose between "general account of" and "general account about." And then there's another choice between "expert authority on" and "expert authority about."

And guess what? The idiom splits really don't matter. And that's not unusual at all on SC questions: if you're not sure how to deal with a certain idiom, the best thing you can do is look for other issues. In this example, you'll find one gigantic parallelism issue that is really the only thing you'll need to worry about.

For more on idioms -- and why you might not want to spend much energy on them -- check out our No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms: https://gmatclub.com/forum/experts-topi ... 41848.html


Quote:
Elizabeth Barber, the author of both Prehistoric Textiles, a comprehensive work on cloth in the early cultures of the Mediterranean, and also of Women's Work, a more general account of early cloth manufacture, is an expert authority on textiles in ancient societies.

Quote:
(A) also of Women's Work, a more general account of early cloth manufacture, is an expert authority on

The word "both" jumps out at me right away. "Both" is followed by a book title ("Prehistoric Textiles"), but the and is followed by "also of." That's not parallel. Eliminate (A).

Quote:
(B) also Women's Work, a more general account of cloth manufacture, is an expert authority about

It's awfully redundant to say "both... and also." And if that isn't enough for you, the phrase "expert authority about" is redundant and doesn't use the correct preposition ("authority on X", not "authority about X.") So plenty of reasons to eliminate (B).

Quote:
(C) of Women's Work, a more general account about early cloth manufacture, is an authority on

Parallelism error again with the "both Prehistoric Textiles... and of Women's Work." (C) is gone.

Quote:
(D) of Women's Work, a more general account about early cloth manufacture, is an expert authority about

Exactly the same problem as (C), so (D) is out, too.

Quote:
(E) Women's Work, a more general account of early cloth manufacture, is an authority on

This is the only choice that gets the parallelism correct, so (E) is our answer.
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Re: Elizabeth Barber, the author of both Prehistoric Textiles, a comprehen  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jun 2015, 02:39
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Okay remember this rule
"Of Both X and Y" is always correct...E is right
"Of Both X and Of Y" is wrong so C and D are out
"Of both X and Also Y" is always wrong so A is out
"of both X and also of Y" is always wrong so B is out
betterscore wrote:
Elizabeth Barber, the author of both Prehistoric Textiles, a comprehensive work on cloth in the early cultures of the Mediterranean, and also of Women's Work, a more general account of early cloth manufacture, is an expert authority on textiles in ancient societies.

(A) also of Women's Work, a more general account of early cloth manufacture, is an expert authority on

(B) also Women's Work, a more general account of cloth manufacture, is an expert authority about

(C) of Women's Work, a more general account about early cloth manufacture, is an authority on

(D) of Women's Work, a more general account about early cloth manufacture, is an expert authority about

(E) Women's Work, a more general account of early cloth manufacture, is an authority on

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Re: Elizabeth Barber, the author of both Prehistoric Textiles, a comprehen  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Sep 2016, 03:27
betterscore wrote:
Elizabeth Barber, the author of both Prehistoric Textiles, a comprehensive work on cloth in the early cultures of the Mediterranean, and also of Women's Work, a more general account of early cloth manufacture, is an expert authority on textiles in ancient societies.

(A) also of Women's Work, a more general account of early cloth manufacture, is an expert authority on
(B) also Women's Work, a more general account of cloth manufacture, is an expert authority about
(C) of Women's Work, a more general account about early cloth manufacture, is an authority on
(D) of Women's Work, a more general account about early cloth manufacture, is an expert authority about
(E) Women's Work, a more general account of early cloth manufacture, is an authority on


Hi,
As far I know, there must be at least 3 things if we want to use comma (,) before the final 'and'. But, in this question, there are just 2 things in the list (e.g., Prehistoric Textiles and Women's Work)-"a comprehensive work on cloth in the early cultures of the Mediterranean" and " a more general account of early cloth manufacture" are not the things that make list; they are just modifier. So, my question is WHY we've used comma (,) before the final 'and'?
Thanks...
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Re: Elizabeth Barber, the author of both Prehistoric Textiles, a comprehen  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Sep 2016, 06:14
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iMyself wrote:
As far I know, there must be at least 3 things if we want to use comma (,) before the final 'and'. But, in this question, there are just 2 things in the list (e.g., Prehistoric Textiles and Women's Work)-"a comprehensive work on cloth in the early cultures of the Mediterranean" and " a more general account of early cloth manufacture" are not the things that make list; they are just modifier. So, my question is WHY we've used comma (,) before the final 'and'?
Thanks...

Hi iMyself, the comma is not before the and'; it is after the Mediterranean :) .

a comprehensive work on cloth in the early cultures of the Mediterranean is an appositive modifier, modifying Prehistoric Textiles. Since the appositive starts with a comma, it should end with a comma (unless the sentence itself is ending).

Let's take a simpler example:

Samuel owns "Mercedes", a swanky car, and "Sentra", a common man's car.

Again, the comma is not before the and'; it is after the car .

p.s. Our book EducationAisle Sentence Correction Nirvana discusses Appositive Modifiers, its application and examples in significant detail. If someone is interested, PM me your email-id; I can mail the corresponding section.
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Re: Elizabeth Barber, the author of both Prehistoric Textiles, a comprehen  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Sep 2016, 11:45
EducationAisle wrote:
iMyself wrote:
As far I know, there must be at least 3 things if we want to use comma (,) before the final 'and'. But, in this question, there are just 2 things in the list (e.g., Prehistoric Textiles and Women's Work)-"a comprehensive work on cloth in the early cultures of the Mediterranean" and " a more general account of early cloth manufacture" are not the things that make list; they are just modifier. So, my question is WHY we've used comma (,) before the final 'and'?
Thanks...

Hi iMyself, the comma is not before the and'; it is after the Mediterranean :) .

a comprehensive work on cloth in the early cultures of the Mediterranean is an appositive modifier, modifying Prehistoric Textiles. Since the appositive starts with a comma, it should end with a comma (unless the sentence itself is ending).

Let's take a simpler example:

Samuel owns "Mercedes", a swanky car, and "Sentra", a common man's car.

Again, the comma is not before the and'; it is after the car .

p.s. Our book EducationAisle Sentence Correction Nirvana discusses Appositive Modifiers, its application and examples in significant detail. If someone is interested, PM me your email-id; I can mail the corresponding section.

That means, if we need to remove any appositive, then we should remove both comma (e.g., before and after comma of modifier), right? Then the remaining will be: Samuel owns "Mercedes"and "Sentra". This one is the perfect sentence.
if I say:
Samuel owns "Mercedes", a swanky car, destroyed by EducationAisle, and "Sentra", a common man's car.
here, ' a swanky car' modifying 'Mercedes' and 'EducationAisle' modifying 'a swanky car'. Now, if we want to remove modifier form the sentence then the remaining will be: Samuel owns "Mercedes", a swanky car and "Sentra", a common man's car. Is the sentence legitimate?
Thanks...
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Re: Elizabeth Barber, the author of both Prehistoric Textiles, a comprehen  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Sep 2016, 23:05
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Hi iMyself, not sure I understood the modified sentence you suggested, but let's take another example:

Samuel owns "Mercedes", a swanky car, "Sentra", a common man's car, and "Bentley", a pricey car.

Here, if you remove the appositives (along with the associated delimiting commas), then the sentence would be:

Samuel owns "Mercedes", "Sentra" and "Bentley".

Now one might argue that there are three elements, but no comma before and. So, in this case, think about it this way: since there were three elements + an appositive, there was a comma after the appositive and a comma before the and. So, when we remove the appositive, we should still let the comma (before the and) remain there. So, in this case, after removing the appositives (along with the associated delimiting commas), then the sentence would be:

Samuel owns "Mercedes", "Sentra", and "Bentley".

In any case, such presence/absence of a comma is never a deal breaker in an option.
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Re: Elizabeth Barber, the author of both Prehistoric Textiles, a comprehen  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jun 2017, 12:04
Elizabeth Barber, the author of both Prehistoric Textiles, a comprehensive work on cloth in the early cultures of the Mediterranean, and also of Women's Work, a more general account of early cloth manufacture, is an expert authority on textiles in ancient societies.

(A) also of Women's Work, a more general account of early cloth manufacture, is an expert authority on - Both Prehistoric Textiles and also of - Not parallel
(B) also Women's Work, a more general account of cloth manufacture, is an expert authority about - Both Prehistoric Textiles and also - Not parallel
(C) of Women's Work, a more general account about early cloth manufacture, is an authority on - Both Prehistoric Textiles and of - Not parallel
(D) of Women's Work, a more general account about early cloth manufacture, is an expert authority about - Both Prehistoric Textiles and of - Not parallel
(E) Women's Work, a more general account of early cloth manufacture, is an authority on - Correct

Answer E
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Re: Elizabeth Barber, the author of both Prehistoric Textiles, a comprehen  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jun 2017, 03:19
souvik101990 wrote:

Verbal Question of The Day: Day 29: Sentence Correction


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Elizabeth Barber, the author of both Prehistoric Textiles, a comprehensive work on cloth in the early cultures of the Mediterranean, and also of Women's Work, a more general account of early cloth manufacture, is an expert authority on textiles in ancient societies.

(A) also of Women's Work, a more general account of early cloth manufacture, is an expert authority on
(B) also Women's Work, a more general account of cloth manufacture, is an expert authority about
(C) of Women's Work, a more general account about early cloth manufacture, is an authority on
(D) of Women's Work, a more general account about early cloth manufacture, is an expert authority about
(E) Women's Work, a more general account of early cloth manufacture, is an authority on

Every question of the day will be followed by an expert reply by GMATNinja in 12-15 hours. Stay tuned! Post your answers and explanations to earn kudos.


I misread the positioning of both.
I read it as 'the author both of' instead of 'the author of both'.
However, if the question were as Eliazbeth Barber, the author both of......, would Option C be the better and correct choice? souvik101990
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Re: Elizabeth Barber, the author of both Prehistoric Textiles, a comprehen  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jun 2017, 13:33
sonikavadhera wrote:
I misread the positioning of both.
I read it as 'the author both of' instead of 'the author of both'.
However, if the question were as Eliazbeth Barber, the author both of......, would Option C be the better and correct choice? souvik101990



Hello sonikavadhera,

I would be glad to help you resolve your doubt. :-)

The expression the author both of is incorrect. The preposition of has to placed after author to clearly convey that certain books have been written by a particular author. The correct expression is author of both X and Y.


Hope this helps. :-)
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Re: Elizabeth Barber, the author of both Prehistoric Textiles, a comprehen  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jul 2017, 22:46
Hi GMATNinja,

just a quick Q: Do expert and authority mean the same in original sentence?

WR,
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Re: Elizabeth Barber, the author of both Prehistoric Textiles, a comprehen  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Nov 2017, 20:02
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adkikani wrote:
Hi GMATNinja,

just a quick Q: Do expert and authority mean the same in original sentence?

WR,
Arpit

Here's my obviously very very hilariously miserably embarrassingly slow answer :oops:: yup, "expert" and "authority" are basically synonyms here, so "expert authority" could be considered redundant. I just paid very little attention to that issue in my explanation, since the parallelism thing is something that you'll see WAY more often on the GMAT in general.

I'm sure that I'm too late to be useful, but I hope this helps anyway!
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Re: Elizabeth Barber, the author of both Prehistoric Textiles, a comprehen  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Sep 2018, 17:50
Elizabeth Barber, the author of both Prehistoric Textiles, a comprehensive work on cloth in the early cultures of the Mediterranean, and also of Women's Work, a more general account of early cloth manufacture, is an expert authority on textiles in ancient societies.

Idiom: both X and Y so we can eliminate A,B



(A) also of Women's Work, a more general account of early cloth manufacture, is an expert authority on

(B) also Women's Work, a more general account of cloth manufacture, is an expert authority about

(C) of Women's Work, a more general account about early cloth manufacture, is an authority on

(D) of Women's Work, a more general account about early cloth manufacture, is an expert authority about

(E) Women's Work, a more general account of early cloth manufacture, is an authority on
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Re: Elizabeth Barber, the author of both Prehistoric Textiles, a comprehen  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Oct 2018, 05:00
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betterscore wrote:
Elizabeth Barber, the author of both Prehistoric Textiles, a comprehensive work on cloth in the early cultures of the Mediterranean, and also of Women's Work, a more general account of early cloth manufacture, is an expert authority on textiles in ancient societies.


(A) also of Women's Work, a more general account of early cloth manufacture, is an expert authority on

(B) also Women's Work, a more general account of cloth manufacture, is an expert authority about

(C) of Women's Work, a more general account about early cloth manufacture, is an authority on

(D) of Women's Work, a more general account about early cloth manufacture, is an expert authority about

(E) Women's Work, a more general account of early cloth manufacture, is an authority on


Verbal Question of The Day: Day 29: Sentence Correction




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hey bb Bunuel, please can u make "Women's Work" in italics? It is in italics in the OG.
I only saw the first book name "Prehistoric Textiles" in italics and since the other one was not in italics i assumed that it wasnt a book name and it took me a while to get it.
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Re: Elizabeth Barber, the author of both Prehistoric Textiles, a comprehen  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Oct 2018, 06:34
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blitzkriegxX wrote:
betterscore wrote:
Elizabeth Barber, the author of both Prehistoric Textiles, a comprehensive work on cloth in the early cultures of the Mediterranean, and also of Women's Work, a more general account of early cloth manufacture, is an expert authority on textiles in ancient societies.


(A) also of Women's Work, a more general account of early cloth manufacture, is an expert authority on

(B) also Women's Work, a more general account of cloth manufacture, is an expert authority about

(C) of Women's Work, a more general account about early cloth manufacture, is an authority on

(D) of Women's Work, a more general account about early cloth manufacture, is an expert authority about

(E) Women's Work, a more general account of early cloth manufacture, is an authority on


Verbal Question of The Day: Day 29: Sentence Correction




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hey bb Bunuel, please can u make "Women's Work" in italics? It is in italics in the OG.
I only saw the first book name "Prehistoric Textiles" in italics and since the other one was not in italics i assumed that it wasnt a book name and it took me a while to get it.


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Re: Elizabeth Barber, the author of both Prehistoric Textiles, a comprehen  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Oct 2018, 08:40
GMATNinja wrote:
adkikani wrote:
Hi GMATNinja,

just a quick Q: Do expert and authority mean the same in original sentence?

WR,
Arpit

Here's my obviously very very hilariously miserably embarrassingly slow answer :oops:: yup, "expert" and "authority" are basically synonyms here, so "expert authority" could be considered redundant. I just paid very little attention to that issue in my explanation, since the parallelism thing is something that you'll see WAY more often on the GMAT in general.

I'm sure that I'm too late to be useful, but I hope this helps anyway!

Hi GMATNinja,
I'm bit confused at the red part. In this official sentence, the word expert has been used as adjective and authority has been used as noun. My question is: how two different types of parts of speech can be synonymous each other?
Thanks__
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Re: Elizabeth Barber, the author of both Prehistoric Textiles, a comprehen  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Oct 2018, 09:50
AsadAbu wrote:
GMATNinja wrote:
adkikani wrote:
Hi GMATNinja,

just a quick Q: Do expert and authority mean the same in original sentence?

WR,
Arpit

Here's my obviously very very hilariously miserably embarrassingly slow answer :oops:: yup, "expert" and "authority" are basically synonyms here, so "expert authority" could be considered redundant. I just paid very little attention to that issue in my explanation, since the parallelism thing is something that you'll see WAY more often on the GMAT in general.

I'm sure that I'm too late to be useful, but I hope this helps anyway!

Hi GMATNinja,
I'm bit confused at the red part. In this official sentence, the word expert has been used as adjective and authority has been used as noun. My question is: how two different types of parts of speech can be synonymous each other?
Thanks__

Technically speaking, a noun and an adjective can't be considered synonyms. But that's not the important part in this case. The bigger issue is that the noun and adjective describe exactly the same characteristic -- so they're redundant.

"Expert," as an adjective, means "possessing expertise." An "authority" is "one who possesses expertise." Technically, I suppose you're right that "expert" and "expertise" aren't synonyms, but one implies the other, so you wouldn't want to use both. We wouldn't write, "Tim is an expert who possesses expertise in the little-known field of mongoose endocrinology," and we also wouldn't write "Tim is an expert authority in the field of mongoose endocrinology." (Note to reader: please do not be alarmed by the mountain of mongoose pellets in Tim's office.)

I hope that helps!
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Re: Elizabeth Barber, the author of both Prehistoric Textiles, a comprehen  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 05 Oct 2018, 10:58
GMATNinja wrote:
AsadAbu wrote:
GMATNinja wrote:
Here's my obviously very very hilariously miserably embarrassingly slow answer :oops:: yup, "expert" and "authority" are basically synonyms here, so "expert authority" could be considered redundant. I just paid very little attention to that issue in my explanation, since the parallelism thing is something that you'll see WAY more often on the GMAT in general.

I'm sure that I'm too late to be useful, but I hope this helps anyway!

Hi GMATNinja,
I'm bit confused at the red part. In this official sentence, the word expert has been used as adjective and authority has been used as noun. My question is: how two different types of parts of speech can be synonymous each other?
Thanks__

Technically speaking, a noun and an adjective can't be considered synonyms. But that's not the important part in this case. The bigger issue is that the noun and adjective describe exactly the same characteristic -- so they're redundant.

"Expert," as an adjective, means "possessing expertise." An "authority" is "one who possesses expertise." Technically, I suppose you're right that "expert" and "expertise" aren't synonyms, but one implies the other, so you wouldn't want to use both. We wouldn't write, "Tim is an expert who possesses expertise in the little-known field of mongoose endocrinology," and we also wouldn't write "Tim is an expert authority in the field of mongoose endocrinology." (Note to reader: please do not be alarmed by the mountain of mongoose pellets in Tim's office.)

I hope that helps!

Thank you GMATNinja for your technical explanation.
In green part, the ''authority may possesses many more tasks, but in this SC ''authority possesses only expertise, because the ''authority'' is modified by ''expert'', which is an adjective. It's perfectly makes sense.
But, in red part, if ''expert possesses expertise'' then expert is surely a DOER (the person who does something). But, unfortunately ''expert'' is NOT being used as ''DOER'' in this SC. So, my question is: how expert and authority describes the SAME characteristic in this regard?
Thanks__
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Originally posted by Asad on 04 Oct 2018, 13:19.
Last edited by Asad on 05 Oct 2018, 10:58, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Elizabeth Barber, the author of both Prehistoric Textiles, a comprehen  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Oct 2018, 07:08
Remember the parallel connectors..
"Both A and B" ...E is right

Q-The author of both X and Y

Only E is correct.
remaining are wrong.
A- both A and also of B
B- both A and also B
C- both A and of B
D- both A and of B
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Re: Elizabeth Barber, the author of both Prehistoric Textiles, a comprehen   [#permalink] 05 Oct 2018, 07:08

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