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On the tournament roster are listed several tennis students, most all

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Re: On the tournament roster are listed several tennis students, most all  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Dec 2017, 22:15
GMATNinja, genxer123
the basic grammar rule that I learn from ESL classes is that almost + Noun vs most of + the + Noun.
here, the rule is fine in E.
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On the tournament roster are listed several tennis students, most all  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Dec 2017, 07:44
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Gnpth wrote:
On the tournament roster are listed several tennis students, most all of which play as good as their instructor

A. most all of which play as good
B. most all of whom play as good
C. almost all of which play as well
D. almost all of whom play as good
E. almost all of whom play as well

chesstitans wrote:
GMATNinja, genxer123
the basic grammar rule that I learn from ESL classes is that almost + Noun vs most of + the + Noun.
here, the rule is fine in E.

chesstitans , I am unclear about what you mean. Would you please be more specific?

Do you intend to assert that "most of whom" is incorrect, and that Answer E rightly uses "almost all of whom" instead?

If so, that is not quite right. In Answers A and B, the problem with "most" is in boldface type. Other mistakes are underlined.

A. most all of which play as good
B. most all of whom play as good

Regarding the word "most," in both A and B, the problem is "all."

Is this issue the subject of your post? If not, please clarify the issue you intended to highlight?
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Re: On the tournament roster are listed several tennis students, most all  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Dec 2017, 14:05
genxer123
in ESL class, I learnt that
almost + Noun
most + the + noun

eg. almost students
most of the students.

In this question almost all of Noun
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New post 24 Dec 2017, 02:40
chesstitans wrote:
genxer123
in ESL class, I learnt that
almost + Noun
most + the + noun

eg. almost students
most of the students.

In this question almost all of Noun

chesstitans , thanks for the clarification.

I think you mean that

"most of the students" =
"almost all of the students"

That is correct. The second phrase is a little stronger than the first, but not enough to matter.

Suppose Answer E were:
most of whom play as well

That would be the right answer. So you are correct. "Almost all of" and "most of" convey similar meaning (nearly all except a few). Both are proper here.

But we cannot pair most with all.
Wrong: most all of whom

And nearly always, we must pair almost with all
Wrong: almost of whom

*One note of caution: your phrase "almost students" is not the same as "almost all" and "most of." I think "almost students" is shorthand or a typo.

The phrase is correct in very few contexts; when, e.g., toddlers are about to start school. We would say, "Not long ago, the toddlers were learning to walk. Now they are almost students!"

"Almost students" does not mean "nearly all." If you see "almost students" without words in between, it is probably wrong.

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Re: On the tournament roster are listed several tennis students, most all  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Mar 2018, 06:16
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On the tournament roster are listed several tennis students, most all of which play as good as their instructor

A. most all of which play as good - most -- which means NOT all -- and all are contradictory ; usage of which is incorrect ; good (adjective) incorrectly serves to modify play (verb).
B. most all of whom play as good - most -- which means NOT all -- and all are contradictory ; good (adjective) incorrectly serves to modify play (verb).
C. almost all of which play as well - which cannot serve to refer to people
D. almost all of whom play as good - good (adjective) incorrectly serves to modify play (verb).
E. almost all of whom play as well - Correct

Answer E
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New post 20 Nov 2018, 09:01
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A. most all of which play as good
B. most all of whom play as good
C. almost all of which play as well
D. almost all of whom play as good
E. almost all of whom play as well
Quote:
in answer choice E as well as can be ambiguous as it leads to 2 meanings:
students play as well(good) as their instructor.
students play, and their instructor also play.

The attributed second meaning is not logical. Because if we meant to say that the students in addition to their instructor physically played, not comparing the quality of their plays, then the wording of E should have been, --- almost all of whom and their instructor play. Here play stands for both the students and the instructors. This wording consciously avoids the confusion of comparison.
On the other hand, in the original E, 'play' refers to only the students and not the instructor/ Therefore E intends to compare the performances rather than just playing by both elements.
Technically there is no reason to fault E with either ambiguity or mix-up.
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Re: On the tournament roster are listed several tennis students, most all  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Mar 2019, 02:22
A. most all of which play as good
B. most all of whom play as good
C. almost all of which play as well
D. almost all of whom play as good
E. almost all of whom play as well

We can see the split between "good" and "well". Good is adjective so it cannot modify the verb(how well they played)
Hence, A,B,D are out.

Modifier issue - Usage of which to refer students. - C is out.

Hence, E is the answer.
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Re: On the tournament roster are listed several tennis students, most all  [#permalink]

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New post 12 May 2019, 06:25
so, " most all of " is correct
"almost all of.." is also correct

both above patterns are correct ? or any pattern is wrong?

pls, explain clearly . thank you
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Re: On the tournament roster are listed several tennis students, most all  [#permalink]

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New post 12 May 2019, 11:20
thangvietnam wrote:
so," most all of " is correct
"almost all of.." is also correct

both above patterns are correct ? or any pattern is wrong?

pls, explain clearly . thank you


thangvietnam , no, most all of is not correct.

Please look upthread at Skywalker18 's post, HERE.
What part of that explanation does not seem clear to you?

We are trying to describe a quantity of or a number of tennis students.
All of the tennis instructors are good.
Are all of the tennis students as good as all of the tennis instructors?
Nearly all of the tennis students are as good as all of the tennis coaches.
When we want to say that the quantity of one group
is just a little smaller than the other group,

we use "almost all."


Correct: Almost all of the apples were delicious.
100 apples. 98 were delicious

Wrong: Most all of the apples were delicious.
What the heck is "most all"?
MOST apples were delicious [and] ALL apples were delicious?
-- MOST: 100 apples. 80 were delicious
-- ALL: 100 apples. 100 were delicious

HERE, HERE, and HERE are three very short posts that explain why almost can modify all but most cannot modify all.

If the word ALL is present, do not put the word MOST before all.

We can say
almost all of them
almost all of whom
nearly all of them
nearly all of whom
not quite all of them
not quite all of whom

In the U.S., in informal speech, people sometimes say "most all of whom" rather than "almost all of whom."

That usage is not accepted on the GMAT or formal writing, and it makes no sense.
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Re: On the tournament roster are listed several tennis students, most all  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jun 2019, 02:13
I ruled out A, B and D because of the use of adverb 'good' where an adjective 'well' was needed.
Between C and E, I chose E because whom refers to the object of the argument.
Though I now understand which should refer to things not people, but why E is correct with 'whom' ??
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On the tournament roster are listed several tennis students, most all  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jun 2019, 08:00
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rashwiniyer wrote:
I ruled out A, B and D because of the use of adverb 'good' where an adjective 'well' was needed.
Between C and E, I chose E because whom refers to the object of the argument.
Though I now understand which should refer to things not people, but why E is correct with 'whom' ??
After a preposition (of), we cannot use a who (we need the object form). Between of who and of whom, only of whom is correct.
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On the tournament roster are listed several tennis students, most all   [#permalink] 27 Jun 2019, 08:00

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