Last visit was: 12 Jul 2024, 16:58 It is currently 12 Jul 2024, 16:58
Close
GMAT Club Daily Prep
Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History
Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.
Close
Request Expert Reply
Confirm Cancel
SORT BY:
Date
Current Student
Joined: 14 Nov 2016
Posts: 1171
Own Kudos [?]: 20952 [290]
Given Kudos: 926
Location: Malaysia
Concentration: General Management, Strategy
GMAT 1: 750 Q51 V40 (Online)
GPA: 3.53
Send PM
Most Helpful Reply
Manhattan Prep Instructor
Joined: 22 Mar 2011
Posts: 2691
Own Kudos [?]: 7848 [39]
Given Kudos: 56
GMAT 2: 780  Q50  V50
Send PM
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
Joined: 04 Sep 2017
Posts: 325
Own Kudos [?]: 20592 [28]
Given Kudos: 51
Send PM
EMPOWERgmat Instructor
Joined: 23 Feb 2015
Posts: 1690
Own Kudos [?]: 14757 [24]
Given Kudos: 766
Send PM
Re: Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is [#permalink]
8
Kudos
16
Bookmarks
Expert Reply
Hello Everyone!

Let's tackle this question, one thing at a time, and narrow down our options quickly so we know how to answer questions like this when they pop up on the GMAT! To begin, let's take a quick look at the question and highlight any major differences between the options in orange:

Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, one of the proudest of family legends.

(A) Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, one of the proudest of family legends.
(B) Almost an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is the digging in the early 1900s of Chicago’s subway tunnels, one of the proudest of family legends.
(C) Digging Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims remember it almost as an epic and it is the one of the proudest of family legends.
(D) America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims remember almost as an epic the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, one of the proudest of family legends.
(E) One of the proudest of family legends, remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims, is the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s.

Whenever you see an entire sentence underlined on the GMAT, and it seems like the organization of each option is completely different, that's a major hint as to what we can focus on:

MODIFIERS!

For each sentence, we need to make sure that any modifiers are placed in the correct spot, and we also need to make sure they're modifying the right thing. We have to answer a couple key modifier questions first:

1. WHAT is one of the proudest family legends? --> digging Chicago's subway tunnels
2. WHAT is remembered almost as an epic? --> the proudest family legend


For each sentence, it needs to be clear what each modifier is referring to, or the sentence needs to be reworded to avoid having the modifiers in the wrong places. Let's see how each one works out:

(A) Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, one of the proudest of family legends.

This is INCORRECT because, as we stated above, the modifier "one of the proudest of family legends" should modify "Remembered almost as an epic...." Instead, it's not entirely clear what that phrase is supposed to modify - the epic or the digging?

(B) Almost an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is the digging in the early 1900s of Chicago’s subway tunnels, one of the proudest of family legends.

This is INCORRECT because the modifier, "one of the proudest of family legends," is placed directly after "subway tunnels," which is wrong. The tunnels are not the family legend - the digging of those tunnels is. It also has the same problem as option A concerning the placement of the "Almost an epic..." modifier.

(C) Digging Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims remember it almost as an epic and it is the one of the proudest of family legends.

This is INCORRECT because the modifier "Digging Chicago's subway tunnels in the early 1900s" is placed directly before "America's 12,000 Bosnian Muslims." Why is this wrong? Because the muslims we're talking about live in the present - the people who dug the Chicago subway tunnels existed in the past. We're getting the timing of who exists when mixed up, and that's why we can rule this out.

(D) America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims remember almost as an epic the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, one of the proudest of family legends.

This is INCORRECT because, as we stated above, the modifier "one of the proudest of family legends" needs to modify the epic, not the digging of the tunnels. It's placed too far away from what it should modify to be correct.

(E) One of the proudest of family legends, remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims, is the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s.

This is CORRECT! If you go back to the 2 questions we asked about modifiers above, this option handles both correctly! The phrase "One fo the proudest of family legends" is placed directly before the epic, which is what it's modifying. Then, the modifier about the epic is placed right before the phrase about digging, which is what that modifier is referring to. Everything is in the right place, and nothing is vague or confusing!


There you have it - option E is our answer! It's the only one that places both modifier phrases in the proper places and pair up with the right antecedents!


Don't study for the GMAT. Train for it.
Experts' Global Representative
Joined: 10 Jul 2017
Posts: 5127
Own Kudos [?]: 4690 [4]
Given Kudos: 38
Location: India
GMAT Date: 11-01-2019
Send PM
Re: Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is [#permalink]
2
Kudos
2
Bookmarks
Expert Reply
Dear Friends,

Here is a detailed explanation to this question-

hazelnut wrote:
Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, one of the proudest of family legends.

(A) Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, one of the proudest of family legends.

(B) Almost an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is the digging in the early 1900s of Chicago’s subway tunnels, one of the proudest of family legends.

(C) Digging Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims remember it almost as an epic and it is the one of the proudest of family legends.

(D) America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims remember almost as an epic the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, one of the proudest of family legends.

(E) One of the proudest of family legends, remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims, is the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s.


SC72561.01


A: This answer choice incorrectly modifies the noun phrase "the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels" with the phrase "one of the proudest of family legends"; an epic is a story that recounts heroic deeds, meaning it would be more logical for the phrase "one of the proudest of family legends" to be modified by the phrase "Remembered almost as an epic ...". This incorrect modification alters the meaning of the sentence to imply that it is the act of digging, rather than the legend associated with it, that is remembered as something akin to an epic. Thus, this answer choice is incorrect.

B: This answer choice commits a meaning-related error by modifying the gerund phrase "the digging" with the phrase "Almost an epic among...", implying that the act of digging itself is "almost an epic"; as an epic is a type of story, it is more logical to apply this modifier to the noun phrase "almost a legend...". Additionally, B modifies the noun phrase "Chicago's subway tunnels" with the phrase "one of the proudest of family legends", implying that the tunnels were the legend. Thus, this answer choice is incorrect.

C: This answer choice commits a meaning-related error by modifying the noun phrase "America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims" with the verb phrase "Digging Chicago’s subway tunnels...", incorrectly implying that the people who remember the digging of the tunnels as an epic are the same ones who dug the tunnels. Thus, this answer choice is incorrect.

D: This answer choice repeats the error of referring to the digging, itself, rather than the legend associated with it as what is remembered as something akin to an epic by using the phrase "remember almost as an epic the digging of...". Thus, this answer choice is incorrect.

E: This answer choice conveys the intended meaning of the sentence, that the digging of the tunnels is one of the proudest of family legends and is remembered as alomost an epic by America's Bosnian Muslims. Thus, this answer choice is correct.

Hence, E is the best answer choice.

All the best!
Experts' Global Team
General Discussion
GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Status: enjoying
Posts: 5264
Own Kudos [?]: 42142 [8]
Given Kudos: 422
Location: India
WE:Education (Education)
Send PM
Re: Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is [#permalink]
5
Kudos
3
Bookmarks
Expert Reply
Top Contributor
Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, one of the proudest of family legends.


(A) Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, one of the proudest of family legends. --- Between an introductory modifier and the modified noun, the placement of the verb is considered faulty.

(B) Almost an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is the digging in the early 1900s of Chicago’s subway tunnels, one of the proudest of family legends. --- Same issue as in A.

(C) Digging Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims remember it almost as an epic and it is the one of the proudest of family legends. --- It looks as if the 12000 Bosnian Muslims did the digging in the early 1900s and are still living to remember the act- Incorrect.

(D) America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims remember almost as an epic the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, one of the proudest of family legends. This must be the correct choice.


(E. One of the proudest of family legends, remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims, is the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s. ---- Same issue as in A and B.
Manager
Manager
Joined: 30 May 2019
Posts: 154
Own Kudos [?]: 29 [2]
Given Kudos: 331
Location: United States
Concentration: Technology, Strategy
GMAT 1: 700 Q49 V35
GPA: 3.6
Send PM
Re: Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is [#permalink]
2
Kudos
daagh wrote:
Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, one of the proudest of family legends.


(A) Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, one of the proudest of family legends. --- Between an introductory modifier and the modified noun, the placement of the verb is considered faulty.

(B) Almost an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is the digging in the early 1900s of Chicago’s subway tunnels, one of the proudest of family legends. --- Same issue as in A.

(C) Digging Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims remember it almost as an epic and it is the one of the proudest of family legends. --- It looks as if the 12000 Bosnian Muslims did the digging in the early 1900s and are still living to remember the act- Incorrect.

(D) America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims remember almost as an epic the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, one of the proudest of family legends. This must be the correct choice.


(E. One of the proudest of family legends, remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims, is the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s. ---- Same issue as in A and B.



How does D get rid of the problem you mentioned in A ?
Also, how does E have the same problem as A ?
GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Status: enjoying
Posts: 5264
Own Kudos [?]: 42142 [0]
Given Kudos: 422
Location: India
WE:Education (Education)
Send PM
Re: Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is [#permalink]
Expert Reply
Top Contributor
Navderm wrote

Quote:
How does D get rid of the problem you mentioned in A ?
Also, how does E have the same problem as A ?


I said about A that between an introductory modifier and the modified noun, the placement of the verb is considered faulty.

The initial phrase 'remembered as ….' is a modifier. But thehre is no such a modifier in D? D has totally side stepped the modifier problem by altogether dropping the introductory modifier.

In E, I hope you can recognize, there are two modifiers that start the clause and then comes the intruding verb rather than the subject just as in both A and B.
Manager
Manager
Joined: 05 Dec 2014
Posts: 181
Own Kudos [?]: 61 [0]
Given Kudos: 289
Location: India
GMAT 1: 660 Q49 V31
GPA: 3.54
Send PM
Re: Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is [#permalink]
I rejected option E because 2 modifiers are connected without a conjunction. Kindly help.
Manager
Manager
Joined: 01 Jan 2017
Posts: 61
Own Kudos [?]: 191 [2]
Given Kudos: 76
WE:General Management (Consulting)
Send PM
Re: Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is [#permalink]
2
Kudos
Quote:
(A) Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, one of the proudest of family legends.


After comma – modifies tunnels, but we need the digging. Out.


Quote:
(B) Almost an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is the digging in the early 1900s of Chicago’s subway tunnels, one of the proudest of family legends.


After comma – modifies tunnels, but we need the digging. Out.


Quote:
(C) Digging Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims remember it almost as an epic and it is the one of the proudest of family legends.


Muslims “remember” (now), but it was in the early 1900s… We need past ("remembered"), not present. Out.


Quote:
(D) America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims remember almost as an epic the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, one of the proudest of family legends.


Muslims “remember” (now), but it was in the early 1900s… We need past ("remembered"), not present. Out.


Quote:
(E) One of the proudest of family legends, remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims, is the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s.


“One of family legends, [modifies “one”] remembered among…, is the digging…” seems ok.

OA: E.
Current Student
Joined: 20 Oct 2018
Posts: 184
Own Kudos [?]: 128 [0]
Given Kudos: 57
Location: India
GMAT 1: 690 Q49 V34
GMAT 2: 740 Q50 V40
GPA: 4
Send PM
Re: Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is [#permalink]
Remembered almost as an epic among America's 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is the digging of Chicago's subway tunnels in the early 1900s, one of the proudest of family legends.

(A) Remembered almost as an epic among America's 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is the digging of Chicago's subway tunnels in the early 1900s, one of the proudest of family legends.

(B) Almost an epic among America's 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is the digging in the early 1900s of Chicago's subway tunnels, one of the proudest of family legends.

(C) Digging Chicago's subway tunnels in the early 1900s, America's 12,000 Bosnian Muslims remember it almost as an epic and it is the one of the proudest of family legends.

(D) America's 12,000 Bosnian Muslims remember almost as an epic the digging of Chicago's subway tunnels in the early 1900s, one of the proudest of family legends.

(E) One of the proudest of family legends, remembered almost as an epic among America's 12,000 Bosnian Muslims, is the digging of Chicago's subway tunnels in the early 1900s.

Dear Experts,
GMATNinja mikemcgarry IanStewart VeritasKarishma daagh abhimahna EMPOWERgmatVerbal egmat EMPOWERgmatRichC AjiteshArun
Option B and C are pretty clear and have clear points of eliminations.
i rejected option D considering that the original question is focusing on "digging of ...", while option D focuses on "Australia's 12000 ..."
Obviously, this is not the correct approach, but I could not find specific points to eliminate either A or D.
I understand that option E is correct.
However, can you please provide more clarity on the different grammatical errors in incorrect options!

Originally posted by aniket16c on 26 Nov 2019, 06:42.
Last edited by aniket16c on 04 Dec 2019, 00:30, edited 1 time in total.
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Status: GMAT/GRE/LSAT tutors
Posts: 6979
Own Kudos [?]: 64481 [18]
Given Kudos: 1819
Location: United States (CO)
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170

GRE 2: Q170 V170
Send PM
Re: Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is [#permalink]
9
Kudos
9
Bookmarks
Expert Reply
aniket16c wrote:
Option B and C are pretty clear and have clear points of eliminations.
i rejected option D considering that the original question is focusing on "digging of ...", while option D focuses on "Australia's 12000 ..."
Obviously, this is not the correct approach, but I could not find specific points to eliminate either A or D.
I understand that option E is correct.
However, can you please provide more clarity on the different grammatical errors in incorrect options!

Good question!

Both (A) and (D) have modifier issues.

Quote:
(A) Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, one of the proudest of family legends.

Here, it seems as though "the digging of Chicago's subway" is remembered as "an epic." That doesn't make any sense. A legend can be remembered as an epic. But not digging. So we turn our noses up at (A).

Quote:
(D) America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims remember almost as an epic the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, one of the proudest of family legends.

Same problem! We can shovel some dirt on (D).

Notice that in (E), it is unmistakably the legend that's remembered as an epic. Far more logical.

I hope that helps!
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
Joined: 06 Jun 2019
Posts: 313
Own Kudos [?]: 974 [1]
Given Kudos: 655
Location: Uzbekistan
Send PM
Re: Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is [#permalink]
1
Kudos
DmitryFarber wrote:
The GMAT is very particular about getting modifiers in the right place. Specifically, we try to get noun modifiers right next to the noun they're modifying. So what is "one of the proudest of family legends"? The digging of the tunnel. A, B, and D don't get the modifier close enough to "digging." C has other problems, but E solves the problem another way. It makes the modifier into part of the main sentence core.

So to answer your objection, sunny91, although we can sometimes have two consecutive modifiers without a conjunction, that's not what we have in E. The core is "One of the proudest of legends is the digging," and only the intervening part ("remembered . . . Muslims") is a modifier.



DmitryFarber Sir,

I know that essential vs. non-essential modifier split shouldn't be a dispositive one. But still there are some SC problems in which this split hugely helps come to the correct answer. In E, what is in between commas is a non-essential mod because of its placement, but its meaning still seems to be essential to understand the whole picture and who thinks of this legend to be an epic (or at least why it’s a family legend). So, could you please elaborate on why we can’t eliminate E for turning that part of information into non-essential?

Thank you very much beforehand.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
Joined: 06 Jun 2019
Posts: 313
Own Kudos [?]: 974 [11]
Given Kudos: 655
Location: Uzbekistan
Send PM
Re: Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is [#permalink]
8
Kudos
3
Bookmarks
JonShukhrat wrote:
DmitryFarber wrote:
The GMAT is very particular about getting modifiers in the right place. Specifically, we try to get noun modifiers right next to the noun they're modifying. So what is "one of the proudest of family legends"? The digging of the tunnel. A, B, and D don't get the modifier close enough to "digging." C has other problems, but E solves the problem another way. It makes the modifier into part of the main sentence core.

So to answer your objection, sunny91, although we can sometimes have two consecutive modifiers without a conjunction, that's not what we have in E. The core is "One of the proudest of legends is the digging," and only the intervening part ("remembered . . . Muslims") is a modifier.



DmitryFarber Sir,

I know that essential vs. non-essential modifier split shouldn't be a dispositive one. But still there are some SC problems in which this split hugely helps come to the correct answer. In E, what is in between commas is a non-essential mod because of its placement, but its meaning still seems to be essential to understand the whole picture and who thinks of this legend to be an epic (or at least why it’s a family legend). So, could you please elaborate on why we can’t eliminate E for turning that part of information into non-essential?

Thank you very much beforehand.



Well, that’s not the first time I am answering my post on my own. Perhaps that’s how gmatclub teaches me to begin to talk to myself, somehow feeling a bit schizophrenic. So, I discussed option E with Myself to a greater extent, and We unanimously decided that what is in between commas isn’t always an inessential modifier. Actually, we found enough evidence that the notion of “essentiality vs. inessentiality” is relevant to only noun modifiers, not adverbial.

In other words, adverbial modifiers such as COMMA + VERBED and COMMA + VERBING have an important role regardless of their position in a sentence. Hence, even if they follow just a noun phrase and seem to modify only it, they still have to make sense with the gist of the sentence. Here are a couple of examples from RonPurewal himself:

- Darren, standing over seven feet tall, is one of the school's best physics students.

(this sentence is nonsense: there is no plausible relationship between Darren’s height and his knowledge of physics.)

- Darren, standing over seven feet tall, is one of the school's best basketball players.

(this sentence is sensible, since it's quite reasonable that Darren’s height contributes to his basketball prowess.)


If we replace COMMA + VERBING with a noun modifier, then that kind of relationship isn’t mandatory, so the below sentence is correct:

- Darren, who stands over seven feet tall, is one of the school's best physics students.

Now, note that the below two sentences have similar meanings:

1. Darren, standing over seven feet tall, is one of the school's best basketball players.
2. Standing over seven feet tall, Darren is one of the school's best basketball players.

The same is true about the below two sentences:

1. James, exhausted from a log day of work, collapsed onto the coach and soon fell asleep.
2. Exhausted from a log day of work, James collapsed onto the coach and soon fell asleep.

You can notice that COMMA + VERBED in the first sentence modifies James, but it also explains why he collapsed and fell asleep. So, no doubt that it is an adverbial modifier even though it follows just a noun phrase and is set off by commas.

Small conclusion: while reading such a sentence as E, we CANNOT cross off COMMA + VERB set off by commas, as we usually do with such a noun modifier. A noun mod set off by commas doesn’t change the meaning when removed, but such an adverbial mod continues to give relevant information about the sentence it’s inserted into, explaining the cause, result, or background of the main action. That’s why sentence 1 and sentence 2 above have similar meanings, and E can be read as below:

Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims, one of the proudest of family legends is the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s.

Final conclusion: Now it’s clear that “Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims” in E isn’t an inessential modifier. As an adverbial mod, it gives additional description to the whole sentence and thus is important to the overall gist.

Phew, we did a good job, I and me))
Manager
Manager
Joined: 31 Aug 2018
Posts: 78
Own Kudos [?]: 22 [0]
Given Kudos: 445
GMAT 1: 610 Q46 V28
Send PM
Re: Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is [#permalink]
GMATNinja wrote:
aniket16c wrote:
Option B and C are pretty clear and have clear points of eliminations.
i rejected option D considering that the original question is focusing on "digging of ...", while option D focuses on "Australia's 12000 ..."
Obviously, this is not the correct approach, but I could not find specific points to eliminate either A or D.
I understand that option E is correct.
However, can you please provide more clarity on the different grammatical errors in incorrect options!

Good question!

Both (A) and (D) have modifier issues.

Quote:
(A) Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, one of the proudest of family legends.

Here, it seems as though "the digging of Chicago's subway" is remembered as "an epic." That doesn't make any sense. A legend can be remembered as an epic. But not digging. So we turn our noses up at (A).

Quote:
(D) America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims remember almost as an epic the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, one of the proudest of family legends.

Same problem! We can shovel some dirt on (D).

Notice that in (E), it is unmistakably the legend that's remembered as an epic. Far more logical.

I hope that helps!


Hi GMATNinja, VeritasKarishma AjiteshArun

Is the below sentence correct?

- Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is one of the proudest of family legends, the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s.

Now, what is being remembered as an epic is the family legend which is placed closed to what it's modifying, the digging of the tunnel.

Is my understanding correct?


Thanks
Saurabh
Tutor
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 15105
Own Kudos [?]: 66592 [12]
Given Kudos: 436
Location: Pune, India
Send PM
Re: Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is [#permalink]
10
Kudos
2
Bookmarks
Expert Reply
Sarjaria84 wrote:
GMATNinja wrote:
aniket16c wrote:
Option B and C are pretty clear and have clear points of eliminations.
i rejected option D considering that the original question is focusing on "digging of ...", while option D focuses on "Australia's 12000 ..."
Obviously, this is not the correct approach, but I could not find specific points to eliminate either A or D.
I understand that option E is correct.
However, can you please provide more clarity on the different grammatical errors in incorrect options!

Good question!

Both (A) and (D) have modifier issues.

Quote:
(A) Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, one of the proudest of family legends.

Here, it seems as though "the digging of Chicago's subway" is remembered as "an epic." That doesn't make any sense. A legend can be remembered as an epic. But not digging. So we turn our noses up at (A).

Quote:
(D) America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims remember almost as an epic the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, one of the proudest of family legends.

Same problem! We can shovel some dirt on (D).

Notice that in (E), it is unmistakably the legend that's remembered as an epic. Far more logical.

I hope that helps!


Hi GMATNinja, VeritasKarishma AjiteshArun

Is the below sentence correct?

- Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is one of the proudest of family legends, the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s.

Now, what is being remembered as an epic is the family legend which is placed closed to what it's modifying, the digging of the tunnel.

Is my understanding correct?


Thanks
Saurabh


A legend is a story. An epic is a heroic story.

So "remembered as an epic" should modify "family legend".

Now what is the story (the legend)? The digging of the tunnels.

So the structure of the sentence needs to convey that the legend is digging of tunnels and that the legend is remembered as an epic.

(E) One of the proudest of family legends, remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims, is the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s.

"remembered as an epic" modifies legends. Past participle modifier.

Remove the modifier and you get "One of the legends is the digging of tunnels" - Correct

Hence choice (E) works.

Look at your sentence:
Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is one of the proudest of family legends, the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s.
The focus needs to be on "digging is the legend", the way it is in choice (E).
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Status: GMAT/GRE/LSAT tutors
Posts: 6979
Own Kudos [?]: 64481 [1]
Given Kudos: 1819
Location: United States (CO)
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170

GRE 2: Q170 V170
Send PM
Re: Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is [#permalink]
1
Kudos
Expert Reply
Sarjaria84 wrote:
GMATNinja wrote:
aniket16c wrote:
Option B and C are pretty clear and have clear points of eliminations.
i rejected option D considering that the original question is focusing on "digging of ...", while option D focuses on "Australia's 12000 ..."
Obviously, this is not the correct approach, but I could not find specific points to eliminate either A or D.
I understand that option E is correct.
However, can you please provide more clarity on the different grammatical errors in incorrect options!

Good question!

Both (A) and (D) have modifier issues.

Quote:
(A) Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, one of the proudest of family legends.

Here, it seems as though "the digging of Chicago's subway" is remembered as "an epic." That doesn't make any sense. A legend can be remembered as an epic. But not digging. So we turn our noses up at (A).

Quote:
(D) America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims remember almost as an epic the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, one of the proudest of family legends.

Same problem! We can shovel some dirt on (D).

Notice that in (E), it is unmistakably the legend that's remembered as an epic. Far more logical.

I hope that helps!


Hi GMATNinja, VeritasKarishma AjiteshArun

Is the below sentence correct?

- Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is one of the proudest of family legends, the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s.

Now, what is being remembered as an epic is the family legend which is placed closed to what it's modifying, the digging of the tunnel.

Is my understanding correct?


Thanks
Saurabh

It looks like VeritasKarishma has you covered! I'll just add one quick thought...

It's almost never a good idea to waste brain cells on tweaked versions of the answer choices. If you understand why (E) is the best choice out of the five options here, then you've done your job!

Looking at a single sentence in a complete vacuum and trying to determine whether it's "correct" or "incorrect" is an entirely different job -- one that you'll never actually have to do on the GMAT. :)
Manager
Manager
Joined: 22 Jun 2017
Posts: 238
Own Kudos [?]: 655 [0]
Given Kudos: 149
Location: Argentina
GMAT 1: 630 Q43 V34
GMAT 2: 710 Q50 V36 (Online)
Send PM
Re: Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is [#permalink]
GMATNinja VeritasKarishma

I don't really get the part of considering digging of chicago.... as a person....
I mean "One of the proudest of family legends" seams to be talking about a member of the family....

Pls clear me here
Tutor
Joined: 16 Oct 2010
Posts: 15105
Own Kudos [?]: 66592 [4]
Given Kudos: 436
Location: Pune, India
Send PM
Re: Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is [#permalink]
3
Kudos
1
Bookmarks
Expert Reply
patto wrote:
GMATNinja VeritasKarishma

I don't really get the part of considering digging of chicago.... as a person....
I mean "One of the proudest of family legends" seams to be talking about a member of the family....

Pls clear me here


A 'legend' is a story, a tale, not a person. 'Digging of tunnels' is a story.
A person's actions can be legendary.
Manager
Manager
Joined: 09 Oct 2016
Posts: 129
Own Kudos [?]: 45 [1]
Given Kudos: 154
GMAT 1: 730 Q51 V38
GPA: 3.6
Send PM
Re: Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is [#permalink]
1
Kudos
EMPOWERgmatVerbal wrote:
Hello Everyone!

Let's tackle this question, one thing at a time, and narrow down our options quickly so we know how to answer questions like this when they pop up on the GMAT! To begin, let's take a quick look at the question and highlight any major differences between the options in orange:

Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, one of the proudest of family legends.

(A) Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, one of the proudest of family legends.
(B) Almost an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is the digging in the early 1900s of Chicago’s subway tunnels, one of the proudest of family legends.
(C) Digging Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims remember it almost as an epic and it is the one of the proudest of family legends.
(D) America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims remember almost as an epic the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, one of the proudest of family legends.
(E) One of the proudest of family legends, remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims, is the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s.

Whenever you see an entire sentence underlined on the GMAT, and it seems like the organization of each option is completely different, that's a major hint as to what we can focus on:

MODIFIERS!

For each sentence, we need to make sure that any modifiers are placed in the correct spot, and we also need to make sure they're modifying the right thing. We have to answer a couple key modifier questions first:

1. WHAT is one of the proudest family legends? --> digging Chicago's subway tunnels
2. WHAT is remembered almost as an epic? --> the proudest family legend


For each sentence, it needs to be clear what each modifier is referring to, or the sentence needs to be reworded to avoid having the modifiers in the wrong places. Let's see how each one works out:

(A) Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, one of the proudest of family legends.

This is INCORRECT because, as we stated above, the modifier "one of the proudest of family legends" should modify "Remembered almost as an epic...." Instead, it's not entirely clear what that phrase is supposed to modify - the epic or the digging?

(B) Almost an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is the digging in the early 1900s of Chicago’s subway tunnels, one of the proudest of family legends.

This is INCORRECT because the modifier, "one of the proudest of family legends," is placed directly after "subway tunnels," which is wrong. The tunnels are not the family legend - the digging of those tunnels is. It also has the same problem as option A concerning the placement of the "Almost an epic..." modifier.

(C) Digging Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims remember it almost as an epic and it is the one of the proudest of family legends.

This is INCORRECT because the modifier "Digging Chicago's subway tunnels in the early 1900s" is placed directly before "America's 12,000 Bosnian Muslims." Why is this wrong? Because the muslims we're talking about live in the present - the people who dug the Chicago subway tunnels existed in the past. We're getting the timing of who exists when mixed up, and that's why we can rule this out.

(D) America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims remember almost as an epic the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s, one of the proudest of family legends.

This is INCORRECT because, as we stated above, the modifier "one of the proudest of family legends" needs to modify the epic, not the digging of the tunnels. It's placed too far away from what it should modify to be correct.

(E) One of the proudest of family legends, remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims, is the digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s.

This is CORRECT! If you go back to the 2 questions we asked about modifiers above, this option handles both correctly! The phrase "One fo the proudest of family legends" is placed directly before the epic, which is what it's modifying. Then, the modifier about the epic is placed right before the phrase about digging, which is what that modifier is referring to. Everything is in the right place, and nothing is vague or confusing!


There you have it - option E is our answer! It's the only one that places both modifier phrases in the proper places and pair up with the right antecedents!


Don't study for the GMAT. Train for it.


Experts,
VeritasKarishma GMATNinja egmat EMPOWERgmatVerbal


Will someone pls elaborate why option A & D is wrong whereas Option E is correct. I am still unable to understand the modifying entity error what you have explained.

The original sentence has said,

1. Main message of sentence : digging of Chicago’s subway tunnels in the early 1900s is Remembered almost as an epic.

AND

This digging of tunnel has been marked as One of the proudest family legend.

Though option E is grammatically correct, in my opinion, option E alerts the main message from "digging is remembered as an epic" to "digging is one of proudest family legend". So same makes option E less preferable to me.

Moreover in option A, D or E, "digging of tunnel " has been marked as "One of the proudest family legend", So irrespective of whether term "epic" modifies "digging of tunnel " or "One of the proudest family legend", it would finally refer to same entity that is "digging of tunnel". So I am still unable to understand the modifier error mentioned earlier.

Out of option A & D, I preferred D as it is in active voice.

Pls suggest what I am missing out here.
GMAT Club Bot
Re: Remembered almost as an epic among America’s 12,000 Bosnian Muslims is [#permalink]
 1   2   3   
Moderators:
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
6979 posts
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
236 posts