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It was in the mid-1970s that women’s studies

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It was in the mid-1970s that women’s studies  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Aug 2017, 07:48
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It was in the mid-1970s that women’s studies courses began to make their appearance in Japanese universities. Thus far, very few studies have actually looked closely at the types of courses offered; the content and methodology of the courses; how they are perceived and evaluated by students, faculty, and administrators; and the impact of these courses – both short-term and long-term – on students as well as on the institutions themselves. An annual survey of women’s studies course offerings in higher institutions nationwide conducted by National Women’s Education Center since 1983 is one of few such sources.

According to its 1994 report, in 1992, 268 institutions of higher education offered courses in women’s studies out of a total of 1,101 institutions. There is no question that this represents a significant increase compared to the late 1970s, when only a handful of institutions offered such courses. Yet, looking again at the courses and the proportion of institutions offering them, it must be pointed out that the figure is deceptive. Even in cases in which courses are offered, usually just one or two courses are taught at each institution. Another questionable point concerns the extent to which the various courses are taught from a feminist perspective. The NWEC survey gives no definition for the term women’s studies. The questionnaire asks whether the respondent runs any ‘women’s studies-related course’ by which it basically means any course that is labeled ‘women’s’, such as ‘Women’s Studies’, ‘Women’s Issues’, or ‘Women’s History’ as well as courses in any of the various disciplines that deal with the subject of women or give special attention to women. Our estimate is that courses with explicitly feminist perspectives make up about one-third of all courses offered. The rest seem to consist of best of an ‘add women and stir’ type of approach, as it were. Thus the instructor of a course on Korean history whose theme is ‘The History of Korean Family and Women’ makes the comment: “The course is not from the perspective of women’s studies, but rather to fill a gap in Japanese research on Korean history”.This is not surprising in the light that, in the NWEC survey, only 26 out of 499 instructors teaching women’s studies-related courses – all of whom were women – claimed their field of specialization to be that of women’s studies per se.

Source: Japanese Women: New Feminist Perspectives on the Past, Present, and Future – Kumiko Fujimura-Fanselow, Atsuko Kameda
Which of the following best summarizes the content of the passage?

A. A critique of women's studies as an academic discipline
B. A report on the progress of women's studies programs in Japan
C. An assessment of the status of women's studies programs in the Japanese academia
D. An analysis of the philosophy of women's studies programs
E. An abbreviated history of women's studies programs in Japan in the 1970s
Spoiler: :: OA
C

According to the author, the 1994 report from National Women's Education Center

A. is the only important annual survey of women's studies programs in higher education in Japan since 1983
B. shows for the first time a significant increase in total number of women's studies courses offered since the 1970s
C. highlights that the percentage of male students in women's studies programs is low
D. shows that the male-female ratio in faculties at Japanese universities is not conducive for women's studies programs
E. indicates significant increase in total number of women's studies courses offered since the 1970s, but is inadequate in portraying the correct status of women's studies
Spoiler: :: OA
E


Which of the following can be said about the course ‘The History of Korean Family and Women’?
A. It represents historic research more than an explicit feminist perspective.
B. It does not conform to National Women's Education Center's definition of "women's studies".
C. It is an old course revised by subtly adding a feminist perspective.
D. It is not likely taught by an instructor who claims women's studies as his/her field of specialization.
E. It highlights concerns over the extent to which women's studies are taught from feminist perspectives.
Spoiler: :: OA
A



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Re: It was in the mid-1970s that women’s studies  [#permalink]

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Re: It was in the mid-1970s that women’s studies  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Sep 2018, 11:16
2
Para1: women subject intro in Japanese courses , a survey to prove that
Para2: survey is misleading , examples to show why misleading ,proof by another survey data misleading

Q1 Ans -C
only option C talks about the introduction of courses so correct

Q2 Ans E
we know author says the data was correct but misleading /deceptive : option E rightly says that and is the answer

Q3 Ans A
the passage states that ‘The History of Korean Family and Women’ makes the comment: “The course is not from the perspective of women’s studies, but rather to fill a gap in Japanese research on Korean history”.
so option A is best pick . rest all options are out of scope
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It was in the mid-1970s that women’s studies  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Sep 2018, 23:06
1
broall wrote:
It was in the mid-1970s that women’s studies courses began to make their appearance in Japanese universities. Thus far, very few studies have actually looked closely at the types of courses offered; the content and methodology of the courses; how they are perceived and evaluated by students, faculty, and administrators; and the impact of these courses – both short-term and long-term – on students as well as on the institutions themselves. An annual survey of women’s studies course offerings in higher institutions nationwide conducted by National Women’s Education Center since 1983 is one of few such sources.

According to its 1994 report, in 1992, 268 institutions of higher education offered courses in women’s studies out of a total of 1,101 institutions. There is no question that this represents a significant increase compared to the late 1970s, when only a handful of institutions offered such courses. Yet, looking again at the courses and the proportion of institutions offering them, it must be pointed out that the figure is deceptive. Even in cases in which courses are offered, usually just one or two courses are taught at each institution. Another questionable point concerns the extent to which the various courses are taught from a feminist perspective. The NWEC survey gives no definition for the term women’s studies. The questionnaire asks whether the respondent runs any ‘women’s studies-related course’ by which it basically means any course that is labeled ‘women’s’, such as ‘Women’s Studies’, ‘Women’s Issues’, or ‘Women’s History’ as well as courses in any of the various disciplines that deal with the subject of women or give special attention to women. Our estimate is that courses with explicitly feminist perspectives make up about one-third of all courses offered. The rest seem to consist of best of an ‘add women and stir’ type of approach, as it were. Thus the instructor of a course on Korean history whose theme is ‘The History of Korean Family and Women’ makes the comment: “The course is not from the perspective of women’s studies, but rather to fill a gap in Japanese research on Korean history”.This is not surprising in the light that, in the NWEC survey, only 26 out of 499 instructors teaching women’s studies-related courses – all of whom were women – claimed their field of specialization to be that of women’s studies per se.

Source: Japanese Women: New Feminist Perspectives on the Past, Present, and Future – Kumiko Fujimura-Fanselow, Atsuko Kameda
Which of the following best summarizes the content of the passage?

A. A critique of women's studies as an academic discipline
B. A report on the progress of women's studies programs in Japan
C. An assessment of the status of women's studies programs in the Japanese academia
D. An analysis of the philosophy of women's studies programs
E. An abbreviated history of women's studies programs in Japan in the 1970s
Spoiler: :: OA
C

According to the author, the 1994 report from National Women's Education Center

A. is the only important annual survey of women's studies programs in higher education in Japan since 1983
B. shows for the first time a significant increase in total number of women's studies courses offered since the 1970s
C. highlights that the percentage of male students in women's studies programs is low
D. shows that the male-female ratio in faculties at Japanese universities is not conducive for women's studies programs
E. indicates significant increase in total number of women's studies courses offered since the 1970s, but is inadequate in portraying the correct status of women's studies
Spoiler: :: OA
E


Which of the following can be said about the course ‘The History of Korean Family and Women’?
A. It represents historic research more than an explicit feminist perspective.
B. It does not conform to National Women's Education Center's definition of "women's studies".
C. It is an old course revised by subtly adding a feminist perspective.
D. It is not likely taught by an instructor who claims women's studies as his/her field of specialization.
E. It highlights concerns over the extent to which women's studies are taught from feminist perspectives.
Spoiler: :: OA
A



Source: Experts Global


Have a small doubt on 3rd Questions...Which of the following can be said about the course ‘The History of Korean Family and Women’?
Excerpts from the passage "Thus the instructor of a course on Korean history whose theme is ‘The History of Korean Family and Women’ makes the comment: “The course is not from the perspective of women’s studies, but rather to fill a gap in Japanese research on Korean history[/color]”.

A is just a paraphrase of what is being told in the coloured line.

Believe the question asks more than paraphrase or according to passage, it is about inference and out of the lot I found option E as more relevant.

A. It represents historic research more than an explicit feminist perspective. --- Paraphrase of statement "The course is not from the perspective of women’s studies, but rather to fill a gap in Japanese research on Korean history"
B. It does not conform to National Women's Education Center's definition of "women's studies". --- Its a 180 degree
C. It is an old course revised by subtly adding a feminist perspective. ---its not mentioned
D. It is not likely taught by an instructor who claims women's studies as his/her field of specialization.---it goes beyond what is mentioned in the paragraph...may be it or maybe it is not...not clearly told
E. It highlights concerns over the extent to which women's studies are taught from feminist perspectives.--- can be inferred as entire 2nd paragraph was to highlight concern that studies are not taught from feminist perspective and doubts the survey..author is skeptical throughout...goes well with the tone as well...

Can someone help here?
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Re: It was in the mid-1970s that women’s studies  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Sep 2018, 12:41
pk123 wrote:
broall wrote:
It was in the mid-1970s that women’s studies courses began to make their appearance in Japanese universities. Thus far, very few studies have actually looked closely at the types of courses offered; the content and methodology of the courses; how they are perceived and evaluated by students, faculty, and administrators; and the impact of these courses – both short-term and long-term – on students as well as on the institutions themselves. An annual survey of women’s studies course offerings in higher institutions nationwide conducted by National Women’s Education Center since 1983 is one of few such sources.

According to its 1994 report, in 1992, 268 institutions of higher education offered courses in women’s studies out of a total of 1,101 institutions. There is no question that this represents a significant increase compared to the late 1970s, when only a handful of institutions offered such courses. Yet, looking again at the courses and the proportion of institutions offering them, it must be pointed out that the figure is deceptive. Even in cases in which courses are offered, usually just one or two courses are taught at each institution. Another questionable point concerns the extent to which the various courses are taught from a feminist perspective. The NWEC survey gives no definition for the term women’s studies. The questionnaire asks whether the respondent runs any ‘women’s studies-related course’ by which it basically means any course that is labeled ‘women’s’, such as ‘Women’s Studies’, ‘Women’s Issues’, or ‘Women’s History’ as well as courses in any of the various disciplines that deal with the subject of women or give special attention to women. Our estimate is that courses with explicitly feminist perspectives make up about one-third of all courses offered. The rest seem to consist of best of an ‘add women and stir’ type of approach, as it were. Thus the instructor of a course on Korean history whose theme is ‘The History of Korean Family and Women’ makes the comment: “The course is not from the perspective of women’s studies, but rather to fill a gap in Japanese research on Korean history”.This is not surprising in the light that, in the NWEC survey, only 26 out of 499 instructors teaching women’s studies-related courses – all of whom were women – claimed their field of specialization to be that of women’s studies per se.

Source: Japanese Women: New Feminist Perspectives on the Past, Present, and Future – Kumiko Fujimura-Fanselow, Atsuko Kameda
Which of the following best summarizes the content of the passage?

A. A critique of women's studies as an academic discipline
B. A report on the progress of women's studies programs in Japan
C. An assessment of the status of women's studies programs in the Japanese academia
D. An analysis of the philosophy of women's studies programs
E. An abbreviated history of women's studies programs in Japan in the 1970s
Spoiler: :: OA
C

According to the author, the 1994 report from National Women's Education Center

A. is the only important annual survey of women's studies programs in higher education in Japan since 1983
B. shows for the first time a significant increase in total number of women's studies courses offered since the 1970s
C. highlights that the percentage of male students in women's studies programs is low
D. shows that the male-female ratio in faculties at Japanese universities is not conducive for women's studies programs
E. indicates significant increase in total number of women's studies courses offered since the 1970s, but is inadequate in portraying the correct status of women's studies
Spoiler: :: OA
E


Which of the following can be said about the course ‘The History of Korean Family and Women’?
A. It represents historic research more than an explicit feminist perspective.
B. It does not conform to National Women's Education Center's definition of "women's studies".
C. It is an old course revised by subtly adding a feminist perspective.
D. It is not likely taught by an instructor who claims women's studies as his/her field of specialization.
E. It highlights concerns over the extent to which women's studies are taught from feminist perspectives.
Spoiler: :: OA
A



Source: Experts Global


Have a small doubt on 3rd Questions...Which of the following can be said about the course ‘The History of Korean Family and Women’?
Excerpts from the passage "Thus the instructor of a course on Korean history whose theme is ‘The History of Korean Family and Women’ makes the comment: “The course is not from the perspective of women’s studies, but rather to fill a gap in Japanese research on Korean history[/color]”.

A is just a paraphrase of what is being told in the coloured line.

Believe the question asks more than paraphrase or according to passage, it is about inference and out of the lot I found option E as more relevant.

A. It represents historic research more than an explicit feminist perspective. --- Paraphrase of statement "The course is not from the perspective of women’s studies, but rather to fill a gap in Japanese research on Korean history"
B. It does not conform to National Women's Education Center's definition of "women's studies". --- Its a 180 degree
C. It is an old course revised by subtly adding a feminist perspective. ---its not mentioned
D. It is not likely taught by an instructor who claims women's studies as his/her field of specialization.---it goes beyond what is mentioned in the paragraph...may be it or maybe it is not...not clearly told
E. It highlights concerns over the extent to which women's studies are taught from feminist perspectives.--- can be inferred as entire 2nd paragraph was to highlight concern that studies are not taught from feminist perspective and doubts the survey..author is skeptical throughout...goes well with the tone as well...

Can someone help here?



E is incorrect because the last sentence says 26/499 are bad courses.It does not say THIS PARTICULAR course.A is more apt
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It was in the mid-1970s that women’s studies  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Oct 2018, 09:20
How is E incorrect in q 3 ? workout

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It was in the mid-1970s that women’s studies  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Oct 2018, 19:41
pk123 wrote:
broall wrote:
It was in the mid-1970s that women’s studies courses began to make their appearance in Japanese universities. Thus far, very few studies have actually looked closely at the types of courses offered; the content and methodology of the courses; how they are perceived and evaluated by students, faculty, and administrators; and the impact of these courses – both short-term and long-term – on students as well as on the institutions themselves. An annual survey of women’s studies course offerings in higher institutions nationwide conducted by National Women’s Education Center since 1983 is one of few such sources.

According to its 1994 report, in 1992, 268 institutions of higher education offered courses in women’s studies out of a total of 1,101 institutions. There is no question that this represents a significant increase compared to the late 1970s, when only a handful of institutions offered such courses. Yet, looking again at the courses and the proportion of institutions offering them, it must be pointed out that the figure is deceptive. Even in cases in which courses are offered, usually just one or two courses are taught at each institution. Another questionable point concerns the extent to which the various courses are taught from a feminist perspective. The NWEC survey gives no definition for the term women’s studies. The questionnaire asks whether the respondent runs any ‘women’s studies-related course’ by which it basically means any course that is labeled ‘women’s’, such as ‘Women’s Studies’, ‘Women’s Issues’, or ‘Women’s History’ as well as courses in any of the various disciplines that deal with the subject of women or give special attention to women. Our estimate is that courses with explicitly feminist perspectives make up about one-third of all courses offered. The rest seem to consist of best of an ‘add women and stir’ type of approach, as it were. Thus the instructor of a course on Korean history whose theme is ‘The History of Korean Family and Women’ makes the comment: “The course is not from the perspective of women’s studies, but rather to fill a gap in Japanese research on Korean history”.This is not surprising in the light that, in the NWEC survey, only 26 out of 499 instructors teaching women’s studies-related courses – all of whom were women – claimed their field of specialization to be that of women’s studies per se.

Source: Japanese Women: New Feminist Perspectives on the Past, Present, and Future – Kumiko Fujimura-Fanselow, Atsuko Kameda
Which of the following best summarizes the content of the passage?

A. A critique of women's studies as an academic discipline
B. A report on the progress of women's studies programs in Japan
C. An assessment of the status of women's studies programs in the Japanese academia
D. An analysis of the philosophy of women's studies programs
E. An abbreviated history of women's studies programs in Japan in the 1970s
Spoiler: :: OA
C

According to the author, the 1994 report from National Women's Education Center

A. is the only important annual survey of women's studies programs in higher education in Japan since 1983
B. shows for the first time a significant increase in total number of women's studies courses offered since the 1970s
C. highlights that the percentage of male students in women's studies programs is low
D. shows that the male-female ratio in faculties at Japanese universities is not conducive for women's studies programs
E. indicates significant increase in total number of women's studies courses offered since the 1970s, but is inadequate in portraying the correct status of women's studies
Spoiler: :: OA
E


Which of the following can be said about the course ‘The History of Korean Family and Women’?
A. It represents historic research more than an explicit feminist perspective.
B. It does not conform to National Women's Education Center's definition of "women's studies".
C. It is an old course revised by subtly adding a feminist perspective.
D. It is not likely taught by an instructor who claims women's studies as his/her field of specialization.
E. It highlights concerns over the extent to which women's studies are taught from feminist perspectives.
Spoiler: :: OA
A



Source: Experts Global


Have a small doubt on 3rd Questions...Which of the following can be said about the course ‘The History of Korean Family and Women’?
Excerpts from the passage "Thus the instructor of a course on Korean history whose theme is ‘The History of Korean Family and Women’ makes the comment: “The course is not from the perspective of women’s studies, but rather to fill a gap in Japanese research on Korean history[/color]”.

A is just a paraphrase of what is being told in the coloured line.

Believe the question asks more than paraphrase or according to passage, it is about inference and out of the lot I found option E as more relevant.

A. It represents historic research more than an explicit feminist perspective. --- Paraphrase of statement "The course is not from the perspective of women’s studies, but rather to fill a gap in Japanese research on Korean history"
B. It does not conform to National Women's Education Center's definition of "women's studies". --- Its a 180 degree
C. It is an old course revised by subtly adding a feminist perspective. ---its not mentioned
D. It is not likely taught by an instructor who claims women's studies as his/her field of specialization.---it goes beyond what is mentioned in the paragraph...may be it or maybe it is not...not clearly told
E. It highlights concerns over the extent to which women's studies are taught from feminist perspectives.--- can be inferred as entire 2nd paragraph was to highlight concern that studies are not taught from feminist perspective and doubts the survey..author is skeptical throughout...goes well with the tone as well...

Can someone help here?


pk123 What you have mentioned about the overall theme of second para is correct. You can infer E from the tone of second paragraph. However, the question is specifically about the course ‘The History of Korean Family and Women’ and hence it is a detail question about this particular course rather than an inference question for second paragraph.

Hope it helps.
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Re: It was in the mid-1970s that women’s studies  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Oct 2018, 09:09
For Q1, I'm having trouble understanding why C, not B is correct.

My understanding of the passage:
Paragraph 1: women's studies programs introduced to Japan. Very few materials that evaluate progress of women's studies programs in Japan. One survey does
Paragraph 2: Survey's impression of progress is misleading

B. A report on the progress of women's studies programs in Japan
C. An assessment of the status of women's studies programs in the Japanese academia
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Re: It was in the mid-1970s that women’s studies  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Oct 2018, 10:33
1.Which of the following best summarizes the content of the passage?

A. A critique of women's studies as an academic discipline
B. A report on the progress of women's studies programs in Japan
C. An assessment of the status of women's studies programs in the Japanese academia
D. An analysis of the philosophy of women's studies programs
E. An abbreviated history of women's studies programs in Japan in the 1970s

I chose B instead of OA-C .

AjiteshArun , GMATNinja , MagooshExpert , GMATGuruNY , VeritasKarishma , DmitryFarber , workout , other experts - Can you please provide a solution for this question ?
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Re: It was in the mid-1970s that women’s studies &nbs [#permalink] 16 Oct 2018, 10:33
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