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Prompted by observations of seemingly related species in neighboring l

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Prompted by observations of seemingly related species in neighboring l  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jan 2019, 05:36
1
8
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A
B
C
D
E

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  95% (hard)

Question Stats:

35% (01:39) correct 65% (01:42) wrong based on 354 sessions

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Prompted by observations of seemingly related species in neighboring locales that he made during his five-year voyage around the world on the HMS Beagle, Charles Darwin conceived his theory of natural selection in which all species evolved over time from a single ancestor or very few common ancestors.


A. in which all species evolved over time from a single ancestor or very few common ancestors

B. in which all species evolve from a single ancestor or very few common ancestors over time

C. whereby over time all species evolve from a single ancestor or very few common ancestors

D. whereby all species have evolved over time from a single ancestor or very few common ancestors

E. whereby all species evolved over time from a single ancestor or very few common ancestors

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Re: Prompted by observations of seemingly related species in neighboring l  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jan 2019, 21:32
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+1 for D
As animals are still evolving we need to use present perfect tense, and have evolved fits the bill perfectly.
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Re: Prompted by observations of seemingly related species in neighboring l  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jan 2019, 01:40
@GMATNinja:- between A & D, is D only correct because it uses 'whereby' instead of 'in which'?
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Re: Prompted by observations of seemingly related species in neighboring l  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Feb 2019, 12:07
Would also want to know Manat. I chose A

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Re: Prompted by observations of seemingly related species in neighboring l  [#permalink]

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New post 23 May 2019, 08:27
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Bunuel wrote:
Prompted by observations of seemingly related species in neighboring locales that he made during his five-year voyage around the world on the HMS Beagle, Charles Darwin conceived his theory of natural selection in which all species evolved over time from a single ancestor or very few common ancestors.


A. in which all species evolved over time from a single ancestor or very few common ancestors

B. in which all species evolve from a single ancestor or very few common ancestors over time

C. whereby over time all species evolve from a single ancestor or very few common ancestors

D. whereby all species have evolved over time from a single ancestor or very few common ancestors

E. whereby all species evolved over time from a single ancestor or very few common ancestors


First, prepositional phrase "in which..." modifies the process of natural selection.
In which denotes a place or process in which something occurs.
Whereby basically means "means by which" something occurs.
Natural selection is the process "by which" all species evolve... so it makes sense to use "whereby" instead of "in which". Eliminate A and B.

Second, verb tense "have evolved" over time makes more sense than the simple past tense ("evolved") or "evolve"

Minor issue...and not so sure if this is the right approach but "over time" should modify the verb "evolve"; as such, placing "over time" at the end of sentence (option B) or before the verb (option C) seemed less likely...
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Re: Prompted by observations of seemingly related species in neighboring l  [#permalink]

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New post 23 May 2019, 12:10
amysong wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
Prompted by observations of seemingly related species in neighboring locales that he made during his five-year voyage around the world on the HMS Beagle, Charles Darwin conceived his theory of natural selection in which all species evolved over time from a single ancestor or very few common ancestors.


A. in which all species evolved over time from a single ancestor or very few common ancestors

B. in which all species evolve from a single ancestor or very few common ancestors over time

C. whereby over time all species evolve from a single ancestor or very few common ancestors

D. whereby all species have evolved over time from a single ancestor or very few common ancestors

E. whereby all species evolved over time from a single ancestor or very few common ancestors


First, prepositional phrase "in which..." modifies the process of natural selection.
In which denotes a place or process in which something occurs.
Whereby basically means "means by which" something occurs.
Natural selection is the process "by which" all species evolve... so it makes sense to use "whereby" instead of "in which". Eliminate A and B.

Second, verb tense "have evolved" over time makes more sense than the simple past tense ("evolved") or "evolve"

Minor issue...and not so sure if this is the right approach but "over time" should modify the verb "evolve"; as such, placing "over time" at the end of sentence (option B) or before the verb (option C) seemed less likely...



I have learnt that relative adverbs such as (where) is only used to refer to a physical location.Please guide.
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Prompted by observations of seemingly related species in neighboring l  [#permalink]

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New post 23 May 2019, 12:23
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1
Mohammad Ali Khan wrote:
amysong wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
Prompted by observations of seemingly related species in neighboring locales that he made during his five-year voyage around the world on the HMS Beagle, Charles Darwin conceived his theory of natural selection in which all species evolved over time from a single ancestor or very few common ancestors.


A. in which all species evolved over time from a single ancestor or very few common ancestors

B. in which all species evolve from a single ancestor or very few common ancestors over time

C. whereby over time all species evolve from a single ancestor or very few common ancestors

D. whereby all species have evolved over time from a single ancestor or very few common ancestors

E. whereby all species evolved over time from a single ancestor or very few common ancestors


First, prepositional phrase "in which..." modifies the process of natural selection.
In which denotes a place or process in which something occurs.
Whereby basically means "means by which" something occurs.
Natural selection is the process "by which" all species evolve... so it makes sense to use "whereby" instead of "in which". Eliminate A and B.

Second, verb tense "have evolved" over time makes more sense than the simple past tense ("evolved") or "evolve"

Minor issue...and not so sure if this is the right approach but "over time" should modify the verb "evolve"; as such, placing "over time" at the end of sentence (option B) or before the verb (option C) seemed less likely...



I have learnt that relative adverbs such as (where) is only used to refer to a physical location.Please guide.

Hi Mohammad Ali Khan , you are correct.

But whereby does not mean where
It's a little weird that a word containing where does not mean where.
This word you just have to memorize.

whereby means BY WHICH
In other words, whereby = the means BY WHICH something happens, for example.
See this definition of whereby, here,
and this definition, which has examples, here.

I hope that helps.
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Prompted by observations of seemingly related species in neighboring l   [#permalink] 23 May 2019, 12:23
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