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To attract the most talented workers some companies

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Re: To attract the most talented workers some companies [#permalink]

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New post 17 Aug 2017, 03:11
To attract the most talented workers, some companies are offering a wider range of benefits, letting employees pick those most important to them.

(A) benefits, letting employees pick those most important to them
(B) benefits, letting employees pick the most important of them to themselves
(C) benefits and letting employees pick the most important to themselves
(D) benefits and let employees pick the most important to them
(E) benefits and let employees pick those that are most important to themselves

EMPOWERgmatRichC ,daagh , mikemcgarry , egmat , GMATNinja , RonPurewal , other experts!! Please help !

In the OA - A, we have 2 plural pronouns in the underlined part that refer to two different antecedents - those refers to benefits and them refers to employees
.Is this usage acceptable as per GMAT?
In the example available in the below link, we eliminate choice because there is an ambiguity with respect to usage of a possessive pronoun "their" in choices in which "they" refers to a different antecedent.
I know neither those or them is a possessive pronoun, but nevertheless, want a clarity on whether the usage of 2 plural pronouns to refer to different antecedent is acceptable ?

https://gmatclub.com/forum/while-depres ... 91967.html
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Re: To attract the most talented workers some companies [#permalink]

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New post 11 Sep 2017, 23:37
Skywalker18 wrote:
To attract the most talented workers, some companies are offering a wider range of benefits, letting employees pick those most important to them.

(A) benefits, letting employees pick those most important to them
(B) benefits, letting employees pick the most important of them to themselves
(C) benefits and letting employees pick the most important to themselves
(D) benefits and let employees pick the most important to them
(E) benefits and let employees pick those that are most important to themselves

EMPOWERgmatRichC ,daagh , mikemcgarry , egmat , GMATNinja , RonPurewal , other experts!! Please help !

In the OA - A, we have 2 plural pronouns in the underlined part that refer to two different antecedents - those refers to benefits and them refers to employees
.Is this usage acceptable as per GMAT?
In the example available in the below link, we eliminate choice because there is an ambiguity with respect to usage of a possessive pronoun "their" in choices in which "they" refers to a different antecedent.
I know neither those or them is a possessive pronoun, but nevertheless, want a clarity on whether the usage of 2 plural pronouns to refer to different antecedent is acceptable ?

https://gmatclub.com/forum/while-depres ... 91967.html


I have the same doubt, could GMATNinja or mikemcgarry please clarify this?
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Re: To attract the most talented workers some companies [#permalink]

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New post 14 Sep 2017, 10:07
To attract the most talented workers, some companies are offering a wider range of benefits, letting employees pick those most important to them.

(A) benefits, letting employees pick those most important to them
- correct as is

(B) benefits, letting employees pick the most important of them to themselves
- "of them to themselves" = redundant.

(C) benefits and letting employees pick the most important to themselves
- "and letting" = incorrect, b/c it makes it sound like this is a second action in a list. "letting" is not the primary verb in the sentence, it ranks lower in importance than "offering", almost like a modifier

(D) benefits and let employees pick the most important to them
- same as "C". "and let" should be "letting"

(E) benefits and let employees pick those that are most important to themselves
- same as "D"

Key here is to understand there are 2 verbs ("offering" and "letting") -- so your job is to find out whether they're EQUAL in importance. If not, which verb is "lower" in importance? That would be "letting".
- Once you get this, you can immediately eliminate C, D & E (b/c they have "and letting/let" which makes it seem like "letting" is of equal importance to "offering"), so you have a 50/50 shot
* Problem with "B" is wordiness. "pick the most important of them to themselves" = redundant. Of course they're going to pick the most important OF THEM. Of what else??



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Re: To attract the most talented workers some companies [#permalink]

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New post 18 Sep 2017, 10:40
I came across this useful thread on "them" vs "themselves".
https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/112223/among-themselves-or-among-them

He shot himself subject and object are the same, but in He shot him they're not --> We use reflexive pronoun when the subject and object are the same. In our case, the subject is "companies" and the object is "employees". Thus, we can't use a reflexive pronoun here.

Correct usage will be "them" in our given sentence.

To attract the most talented workers, some companies are offering a wider range of benefits, letting employees pick those most important to them.

(A) benefits, letting employees pick those most important to them -Correct
(B) benefits, letting employees pick the most important of them to themselves -incorrect usage of themselves
(C) benefits and letting employees pick the most important to themselves -incorrect usage of themselves
(D) benefits and let employees pick the most important to them -incorrect parallelism
(E) benefits and let employees pick those that are most important to themselves -incorrect usage of themselves
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Re: To attract the most talented workers some companies [#permalink]

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New post 21 Sep 2017, 13:32
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Skywalker18 wrote:
To attract the most talented workers, some companies are offering a wider range of benefits, letting employees pick those most important to them.

(A) benefits, letting employees pick those most important to them
(B) benefits, letting employees pick the most important of them to themselves
(C) benefits and letting employees pick the most important to themselves
(D) benefits and let employees pick the most important to them
(E) benefits and let employees pick those that are most important to themselves

EMPOWERgmatRichC ,daagh , mikemcgarry , egmat , GMATNinja , RonPurewal , other experts!! Please help !

In the OA - A, we have 2 plural pronouns in the underlined part that refer to two different antecedents - those refers to benefits and them refers to employees
.Is this usage acceptable as per GMAT?
In the example available in the below link, we eliminate choice because there is an ambiguity with respect to usage of a possessive pronoun "their" in choices in which "they" refers to a different antecedent.
I know neither those or them is a possessive pronoun, but nevertheless, want a clarity on whether the usage of 2 plural pronouns to refer to different antecedent is acceptable ?

https://gmatclub.com/forum/while-depres ... 91967.html

Really good question, Skywalker18. And I'm not sure that you'll find the answers very satisfying. :)

I think that it can be really confusing when two consecutive pronouns refer to two different antecedents, and the GMAT generally frowns upon that type of usage. (Here's an example in a recent QOTD: https://gmatclub.com/forum/qotd-paper-p ... 49765.html). The key word there is "generally", though. As with most things on the GMAT, there are exceptions.

The important thing to remember is that the GMAT doesn't see pronoun ambiguity as an absolute rule. Yes, pronoun ambiguity is important, and you should notice it and think about it when you have the opportunity. But it's not necessarily WRONG. If, for example, all of your answer choices have the same pronoun ambiguity, then it's a non-issue -- and that's exactly the case in this question. Or if the other answer choices have more severe errors, then the pronoun ambiguity might be "trumped" by some other mistake.

Bottom line: yeah, you should be pretty suspicious whenever they give you two consecutive pronouns that refer to different antecedents. But don't assume that the answer choice is automatically wrong in that situation until you're sure that you have better options.

For more on ambiguity, check out our YouTube webinar on pronouns.
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Re: To attract the most talented workers some companies [#permalink]

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New post 07 Oct 2017, 05:05
GMATNinja wrote:
Skywalker18 wrote:
To attract the most talented workers, some companies are offering a wider range of benefits, letting employees pick those most important to them.

(A) benefits, letting employees pick those most important to them
(B) benefits, letting employees pick the most important of them to themselves
(C) benefits and letting employees pick the most important to themselves
(D) benefits and let employees pick the most important to them
(E) benefits and let employees pick those that are most important to themselves

EMPOWERgmatRichC ,daagh , mikemcgarry , egmat , GMATNinja , RonPurewal , other experts!! Please help !

In the OA - A, we have 2 plural pronouns in the underlined part that refer to two different antecedents - those refers to benefits and them refers to employees
.Is this usage acceptable as per GMAT?
In the example available in the below link, we eliminate choice because there is an ambiguity with respect to usage of a possessive pronoun "their" in choices in which "they" refers to a different antecedent.
I know neither those or them is a possessive pronoun, but nevertheless, want a clarity on whether the usage of 2 plural pronouns to refer to different antecedent is acceptable ?

https://gmatclub.com/forum/while-depres ... 91967.html

Really good question, Skywalker18. And I'm not sure that you'll find the answers very satisfying. :)

I think that it can be really confusing when two consecutive pronouns refer to two different antecedents, and the GMAT generally frowns upon that type of usage. (Here's an example in a recent QOTD: https://gmatclub.com/forum/qotd-paper-p ... 49765.html). The key word there is "generally", though. As with most things on the GMAT, there are exceptions.

The important thing to remember is that the GMAT doesn't see pronoun ambiguity as an absolute rule. Yes, pronoun ambiguity is important, and you should notice it and think about it when you have the opportunity. But it's not necessarily WRONG. If, for example, all of your answer choices have the same pronoun ambiguity, then it's a non-issue -- and that's exactly the case in this question. Or if the other answer choices have more severe errors, then the pronoun ambiguity might be "trumped" by some other mistake.

Bottom line: yeah, you should be pretty suspicious whenever they give you two consecutive pronouns that refer to different antecedents. But don't assume that the answer choice is automatically wrong in that situation until you're sure that you have better options.

For more on ambiguity, check out our YouTube webinar on pronouns.


Hi,
Those and them have clear references. Option A looks best, but I have a query- here those actually modify benefits. But the term benefits is associated with a wider range of . So, initially I hesitated that those is incorrect as we need a singular form that. But none of the options look good and A comes out as the best one. Can you kindly clarify if we have that in the sentence instead of those, thn option A stands still good.
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Re: To attract the most talented workers some companies [#permalink]

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New post 19 Oct 2017, 03:53
hazelnut wrote:
The Official Guide for GMAT Review 2018

Practice Question
Question No.: SC 743

To attract the most talented workers, some companies are offering a wider range of benefits, letting employees pick those most important to them.

(A) benefits, letting employees pick those most important to them
(B) benefits, letting employees pick the most important of them to themselves
(C) benefits and letting employees pick the most important to themselves
(D) benefits and let employees pick the most important to them
(E) benefits and let employees pick those that are most important to themselves


B: some companies are offering a wider range of benefits, letting employees pick the most important of them to themselves
C: some companies are offering a wider range of benefits, letting employees pick the most important to themselves
E: some companies are offering a wider range of benefits, letting employees pick those that are most important to themselves
In each of these options, the prepositional phrase in red is an adverb serving to modify important.
Since important refers to benefits, the following meaning is conveyed:
HOW are the benefits IMPORTANT?
They are important TO THEMSELVES.
This meaning is nonsensical: benefits cannot consider themselves important.
Eliminate B, C and E.

D: are offering...and let
Here, are offering and let are not parallel.
Eliminate D.

The correct answer is
[Reveal] Spoiler:
A
.
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Re: To attract the most talented workers some companies [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jan 2018, 07:58
GMATNinja wrote:
I see different calls for help in at least three different posts, so I'll try to address everything in one big, fat explanation:

Quote:
(A) benefits, letting employees pick those most important to them

"Those" is just a plural pronoun here, so we should look for some plural noun that it can refer back to. "Benefits" makes sense, right? "...letting employees pick the benefits most important to them." So we're good there. (And for more on demonstrative pronouns, check out our Topic of the Week or our YouTube video about the many uses of "that.")

And yes, "benefits" is an object, but there's no reason why a pronoun can't refer back to an object. There's some weird myth going around about that, and I'm not sure where it's coming from. Pronouns can refer to subjects or objects.

"Letting" is used as a modifier here (click here for more on "-ing" modifiers), and that makes sense: "letting employees pick (the benefits) most important to them" is giving us more information about what happens when "companies are offering a wider range of benefits." So it makes sense for "letting" to be a modifier, not a verb. Keep (A).

Quote:
(B) benefits, letting employees pick the most important of them to themselves

"Themselves" is a reflexive pronoun. Correct uses of reflexive pronouns:

    Mike was proud of himself when he successfully surfed a 25-foot wave.
    Bogdan and Souvik admired themselves in the mirror after crushing the GMAT.

But I don't think we can justify using "themselves" in the original sentence. Employees can pick the benefits that are most important to them -- but there's no need for the reflexive "themselves." (And for whatever it's worth: I can't think of another official GMAT question that draws any sort of distinction between reflexive and non-reflexive pronouns.) Also, I think it's a little bit confusing to have "them" refer to "benefits", while "themselves" refers back to "employees" -- but either way, (B) is out.

Quote:
(C) benefits and letting employees pick the most important to themselves

I think I could live with the parallelism here: "letting" follows "and", so we need to find something that's parallel to "letting." How about "offering"? So "some companies are offering..." and "some companies are letting..." I guess that's OK, though I think the sentences works a little bit better if "letting" is a modifier, but I wouldn't automatically eliminate (C) because of that.

But the "themselves" is wrong again - "them" would be fine. Eliminate (C).

Quote:
(D) benefits and let employees pick the most important to them

Now there's a clear parallelism issue. "Let" is a verb, and I guess it could be parallel to "are offering" -- but if that's the case, why are they in different tenses? That can't be right. The only other option is "attract", and that would make any sense, either. Eliminate (D).

Quote:
(E) benefits and let employees pick those that are most important to themselves

Same parallelism error as in (D), and the same error with "themselves" as in (B) and (C).

So (A) wins.


GMATNinja

Am I correct in this reasoning,
If the option would have been 'benefits, letting employees pick those most important to themselves'

Then this reflexive pronoun would refer to companies and not the employees? As the subject is companies.

Please let me know if I am correct

Regards
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Re: To attract the most talented workers some companies [#permalink]

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New post 22 Jan 2018, 15:35
anugrahs wrote:

GMATNinja

Am I correct in this reasoning,
If the option would have been 'benefits, letting employees pick those most important to themselves'

Then this reflexive pronoun would refer to companies and not the employees? As the subject is companies.

So I think you're suggesting this version of the sentence:

    To attract the most talented workers, some companies are offering a wider range of benefits, letting employees pick those most important to themselves.

But I think you might be confusing two different issues -- there's the pronoun, and then there's the "-ing" modifier.

Just like any other pronoun, the reflexive pronoun "themselves" does not automatically need to refer to the grammatical subject of the sentence -- really, there's no reason why you would look at ANY type of pronoun and automatically assume that it has to refer back to the grammatical subject. A pronoun can refer to an object or a subject. The GMAT only cares that the pronoun actually makes sense, and refers to a noun that's nearby enough to avoid any confusion. (More on pronouns in this YouTube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IhN_KU1bSKU.)

And in this particular version of the sentence, "themselves" would seem to refer to the most recent plural noun -- and that's "employees", not "companies."

I think you might be thinking of something else, though: in situations like these, an "-ing" modifier will either modify the subject of a clause or the entire clause -- but either way, the "-ing" modifier must "make sense" with the subject of the clause.

So in your example, "...some companies are offering a wider range of benefits, letting employees pick those most important to themselves...", it's true that "some companies" has to be the subject that "performs" the action "letting employees pick...". (More on "-ing" words in this article.) But there's no reason why the pronoun "themselves" needs to have anything to do with the subject, "some companies."

So maybe the "-ing" modifier was what you were thinking of?

I hope this helps!
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Re: To attract the most talented workers some companies   [#permalink] 22 Jan 2018, 15:35

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