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Typically, crickets are solitary insects. In fact, often crickets will

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Typically, crickets are solitary insects. In fact, often crickets will [#permalink]

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New post 25 Mar 2017, 00:32
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A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  35% (medium)

Question Stats:

65% (01:08) correct 35% (01:05) wrong based on 186 sessions

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Typically, crickets are solitary insects. In fact, often crickets will kill and eat other crickets in their territory. Yet, scientists have observed huge communities of crickets migrating to new homes.

Which of the following hypotheses best explains the contrast described above?
A. Some crickets will not kill other crickets in their territories.
B. Crickets migrate to new homes when predators or changing environmental conditions force them to leave.
C. Ants, wasps, and termites are all social insects that move in large groups.
D. The female cricket is more aggressive than the male cricket.
E. A single cricket’s risk of being eaten by a predator is lessened when traveling in a large group.


Source: McGraw-Hill's GMAT

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Re: Typically, crickets are solitary insects. In fact, often crickets will [#permalink]

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New post 12 Aug 2017, 08:44
Crickets might be moving to new homes due to x reason but why will they move in the group? That is not answered by option B.

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Re: Typically, crickets are solitary insects. In fact, often crickets will [#permalink]

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New post 14 Aug 2017, 11:34
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confused between B and E. Please explain.
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Typically, crickets are solitary insects. In fact, often crickets will [#permalink]

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New post 13 Oct 2017, 22:55
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pushkarajnjadhav wrote:
confused between B and E. Please explain.



In the premise, we can see that survival is a huge risk for crickets bcos they are hunted down due to being alone,what would explain their sticking together inspite of them being solitary in nature?
I think between B and E, E explains why crickets migrate together(and hence stick together) to new homes. B only states that crickets are forced to LEAVE bcos of predators and turn in environmental conditions.. It doesn't mention why crickets would stay together .
E explains this phenomenon by saying that if crickets stick together, they are safer.
Typically, crickets are solitary insects. In fact, often crickets will   [#permalink] 13 Oct 2017, 22:55
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Typically, crickets are solitary insects. In fact, often crickets will

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