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November is traditionally the strongest month for sales of light truck

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November is traditionally the strongest month for sales of light truck  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 10 Sep 2018, 05:12
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November is traditionally the strongest month for sales of light trucks, but sales this past November, even when compared with sales in previous Novembers, accounted for a remarkably large share of total vehicle sales.


(A) but sales this past November, even when compared with sales in previous Novembers,

(B) but even when it is compared with previous Novembers, this past November’s sales

(C) but even when they are compared with previous Novembers, sales of light trucks this past November

(D) so that compared with previous Novembers, sales of light trucks this past November

(E) so that this past November’s sales, even compared with previous Novembers’ sales,[/quote]


Verbal Question of The Day: Day 187: Sentence Correction


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The Official Guide for GMAT Review, 2016

Practice Question
Question No.: SC 116
Page: 695



November Sales

(A) CORRECT

(B) Pronoun (it); Comparison (compared with)

(C) Comparison (compared with)

(D) Meaning (so that); Comparison (compared with)

(E) Meaning (so that)


First glance

The underline starts with the conjunction but, so this sentence may be testing sentence structure, meaning, or an idiom.

Issues

(1) Pronoun: it

Answers (B) and (C) both use a pronoun in the same location in the sentence, but (B) uses it and (C) uses they. Check for a singular-plural match.

In both cases, logically, the pronoun should refer to the plural noun sales (later in the sentence); in other words, the pronoun should be plural. Eliminate answer (B).

Note: if you say that it refers to the singular November in answer (B), then the comparison is faulty. Previous Novembers aren’t supposed to be compared with the month of November in general; they are supposed to be compared with this past November.

(2) Comparison: X compared with Y

When you see a comparison marker, make sure that the comparison is apples to apples.

(A) sales this past November… compared with sales in previous Novembers

(B) it [sales] is compared with previous Novembers

(C) they [sales] are compared with previous Novembers

(D) compared with previous Novembers, sales…this past November

(E) this past November’s sales, …compared with previous Novembers’ sales

Fix: Answers (B), (C), and (D) compare sales to previous Novembers. This is a faulty comparison. Answers (A) and (E) correctly compare sales from one period to sales from another period. Eliminate answers (B), (C), and (D).

(3) Meaning: so that

Answers (A), (B), and (C) all start with but; answers (D) and (E) start with so that. What’s the difference?

The sentence is trying to convey a surprising fact. It is already the case that November is typically a strong month for light truck sales. Surprisingly, this past November was even stronger than usual. The contrast word but can appropriately link these two sentence together: you already knew something was true, but it was even more true this past November!

The phrase so that conveys a cause-effect relationship: She studied hard so that she would get a good score on the test. This isn’t the right meaning for the official sentence; it isn’t the case that November is traditionally the strongest month so that (in order to cause) it would be even stronger this past November. Eliminate answers (D) and (E) for faulty meaning.

The Correct Answer

Correct answer (A) makes a valid comparison between sales this past November and sales in previous Novembers. Note that some people may dislike this choice because it can seem wordy; wordiness by itself is not a good enough reason to cross off an answer. Look for errors in grammar or meaning!

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Originally posted by JarvisR on 07 Aug 2015, 00:09.
Last edited by Bunuel on 10 Sep 2018, 05:12, edited 4 times in total.
Edited the question.
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Re: November is traditionally the strongest month for sales of light truck  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Dec 2017, 12:50
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As has been our habit with the QOTDs lately, this question also appeared in a recent YouTube webinar on comparisons. So if you prefer your explanations in video form, head on over here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dsa-RaX765o

Quote:
(A) but sales this past November, even when compared with sales in previous Novembers,

On these comparison questions, you always want to ask yourself: what, exactly, is the heart of the comparison? In this case, look at the stuff that surrounds the phrase “when compared with”: “sales this past November, even when compared with sales in previous Novembers…” Hm, that looks pretty good.

Not much else going on here besides the comparison, so let’s keep (A) for now.

Quote:
(B) but even when it is compared with previous Novembers, this past November’s sales

The word “it” is the first thing that jumps out at me in (B), so we need to look for a nice, singular noun that “it” could refer back to. The only thing that could possibly make sense is for “it” to refer to “this November”, but that’s not an option, because of the structure of the phrase after the comma: “this past November’s sales” is plural, and “November’s” is possessive.

So “it” can’t refer to “this November” since that phrase is possessive, and “it” can’t refer to “this November’s sales” because “sales” is plural. For that reason, (B) is out.

And for what it’s worth: even if you do assume that “it” somehow refers to “this past November”, the sentence still wouldn’t be great. We’d have “…even when [this past November] is compared with previous Novembers, this past November’s sales…” That’s weird: it would be sooooooo much more direct to just compare the sales to each other, instead of comparing the “Novembers”, and then restarting the sentence about the sales.


Quote:
(C) but even when they are compared with previous Novembers, sales of light trucks this past November

Once again, the pronoun “they” should jump off the page at us. “They” seems to refer to “sales of light trucks”, and that gives us “…even when [sales of light trucks] are compared with previous Novembers…” This literally compares sales to months. That’s nonsense. Let’s ditch (C).

Quote:
(D) so that compared with previous Novembers, sales of light trucks this past November

If we look at (D) very strictly and literally, the comparison still doesn’t make sense. “…compared with previous Novembers, sales of light trucks this past November…” We can’t compare “previous Novembers” to “sales of light trucks.” So (D) is gone, too.

Quote:
(E) so that this past November’s sales, even compared with previous Novembers’ sales,

In a vacuum, I guess the comparison is OK here: “this past November’s sales” are compared with “previous Novembers’ sales.” I can live with that.

But let’s talk about “so that.” The phrase “so that” suggests some sort of purpose, or at least expresses a rationale for accomplishing something. You could say “I eat burritos so that I will someday weigh as much as an aircraft carrier” or “Domenico posts regularly on GMAT Club so that other people can kick ass on this ridiculous exam.” In both cases, a purpose or effect follows the phrase “so that.”

But there’s no good reason to use “so that” in this particular sentence: “November is traditionally the strongest month for sales of light trucks, so that this past November’s sales… accounted for a remarkably large share of total vehicle sales.” That makes no sense at all, because the second phrase, “this past November’s sales… accounted for a remarkably large share…” is definitely NOT the purpose or effect of the first phrase, “November is traditionally the strongest month for sales of light trucks.”

For that reason, we can ditch (E), and we’re left with (A).
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Re: November is traditionally the strongest month for sales of light truck  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jun 2016, 11:10
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JarvisR wrote:
November is traditionally the strongest month for sales of light trucks, but sales this past November, even when compared with sales in previous Novembers, accounted for a remarkably large share of total vehicle sales.

A but sales this past November, even when compared with sales in previous Novembers,
B but even when it is compared with previous Novembers, this past November’s sales
C but even when they are compared with previous Novembers, sales of light trucks this past November
D so that compared with previous Novembers, sales of light trucks this past November
E so that this past November’s sales, even compared with previous Novembers’ sales,

OG16 SC116


Meaning wins over all the rules.

The meaning of the sentence is that Sales in November are usually high, but the sales during the recent November overtook all previous Novembers and accounted for remarkable large share of sales.

A but sales this past November, even when compared with sales in previous Novembers,. Meaning looks pretty clear. We have contrast by the word 'but'. Sales is compared with sales.
B but even when it is compared with previous Novembers, this past November’s sales. 'it' is singular and is used wrongly with plural 'sales'
C but even when they are compared with previous Novembers, sales of light trucks this past November. Replace 'they' with Sales- but even when sales are compared with previous Novembers. Sales are compared with Novembers.
D so that compared with previous Novembers, sales of light trucks this past November. 'so that' shows result, whereas we want contrast
E so that this past November’s sales, even compared with previous Novembers’ sales,. 'so that' shows result, whereas we want contrast

A is the answer
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Re: November is traditionally the strongest month for sales of light truck  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Aug 2015, 01:54
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"sales" should be compared with "sales".

Only A and E do that.

In E we dont have contrast. We need it to highlight that the sales are better this time.

Only A does it.

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Re: November is traditionally the strongest month for sales of light truck  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Sep 2015, 04:37
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+1 another victim of e-gmat rule

I explicitly remember (even in my notes) that we cannot use "when compared with"

We need an explanation from an e-gmat expert.
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Re: November is traditionally the strongest month for sales of light truck  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Nov 2015, 05:22
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November is traditionally the strongest month for sales of light trucks, but sales this past November, even when compared with sales in previous Novembers, accounted for a remarkably large share of total vehicle sales.

A but sales this past November, even when compared with sales in previous Novembers,
B but even when it is compared with previous Novembers, this past November’s sales-Wrong comparison(sales with month)
C but even when they are compared with previous Novembers, sales of light trucks this past November-Again same mistake
D so that compared with previous Novembers, sales of light trucks this past November-so that makes no sense
E so that this past November’s sales, even compared with previous Novembers’ sales,--so that makes no sense

Acc to @e-gmat ,"when compared with" is incorrect.
But A is the best option we have.
Anyway,looks like we can't blindly apply that rule here.
Explanation needed @e-gmat.
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Re: November is traditionally the strongest month for sales of light truck  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Mar 2016, 21:19
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another victim of the @e-gmat rule..
we just need to learn the GMAT rules...
GMAT rules will never go wrong... :roll:
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Re: November is traditionally the strongest month for sales of light truck  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jun 2016, 09:01
1
1
As per e-gmat my notes indicate the following;

You cannot use the following:
When compared to
When contrasted to
As compared with

Here the correct answer uses when compared with (as compared with would be incorrect or when compared/contrasted to)

Hope this helps!

@e-gmat could you advise if answer choice C is incorrect because of the ambiguous pronoun 'they'? May refer to the trucks themselves and the sales . . .
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Re: November is traditionally the strongest month for sales of light truck  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jul 2016, 00:48
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Regarding @e-gmat:
I've also got to the trap. E-gmat states that "when compared/contrasted to" and also "as contrasted with" is incorrect. Not a single word about "when compared with". However, they state not to used this word with as/with, so one might imply that "when compared with" is incorrect, which is not true, as we see in this example. Be diligent!
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Re: November is traditionally the strongest month for sales of light truck  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Nov 2016, 00:56
I don't understand why we need to use "but" to contrast 2 ICs here.
First sentence says that "November is traditionally the strongest month for selling truck"
Second sentence says that "Sales of past November accounted for a remarkable large share of total vehicles"
Doesn't it mean "past november's sales is really high just as it used to be"
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Re: November is traditionally the strongest month for sales of light truck  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Nov 2016, 12:24
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pakasaip wrote:
I don't understand why we need to use "but" to contrast 2 ICs here.
First sentence says that "November is traditionally the strongest month for selling truck"
Second sentence says that "Sales of past November accounted for a remarkable large share of total vehicles"
Doesn't it mean "past november's sales is really high just as it used to be"


No, "just as it used to be" is not meant. You omitted the part "even when compared with sales in previous Novembers". This part validates the use of "but". An outstanding or exceptional occurrence calls for the usage of a contrasting word such as "but".

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Re: November is traditionally the strongest month for sales of light truck  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jun 2017, 05:38
Hi Payal
According to e-gmat verbal comparisons , isn't - when compared/contrasted to/with is non-idiomatic ?

I eliminated all options based on this .

Can you please throw some light on this question.
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Re: November is traditionally the strongest month for sales of light truck  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jun 2017, 10:00
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Nightmare007 wrote:
Hi Payal
According to e-gmat verbal comparisons , isn't - when compared/contrasted to/with is non-idiomatic ?

I eliminated all options based on this .

Can you please throw some light on this question.
Thank you




Hi Nightmare007,


Thank you for the query. :-)


It is true that generally on GMAT SC, when compared to/with is deemed incorrect. However, the context of this official sentence makes this idiom work.


Let's evaluate what this sentence intends to convey. The sentence says typically, light trucks sell the most in November. However, the past November experienced a remarkable increase in total vehicle sales. The sales was remarkable even when it is compared with sales in previous Novembers.

So the expression even when compared with presents the condition that even if the comparison is made with the sales previous Novembers, the sales of the past November accounted for very high total vehicle sales.

Hence, the context of this sentence, the usage of even when compared with is correct.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
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Re: November is traditionally the strongest month for sales of light truck  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Nov 2017, 16:36
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JarvisR wrote:
The Official Guide for GMAT Review, 2016

Practice Question
Question No.: SC 116
Page: 695

November is traditionally the strongest month for sales of light trucks, but sales this past November, even when compared with sales in previous Novembers, accounted for a remarkably large share of total vehicle sales.

(A) but sales this past November, even when compared with sales in previous Novembers,

(B) but even when it is compared with previous Novembers, this past November’s sales

(C) but even when they are compared with previous Novembers, sales of light trucks this past November

(D) so that compared with previous Novembers, sales of light trucks this past November

(E) so that this past November’s sales, even compared with previous Novembers’ sales,


First glance

The underline starts with the conjunction but, so this sentence may be testing sentence structure, meaning, or an idiom.

Issues

(1) Pronoun: it

Answers (B) and (C) both use a pronoun in the same location in the sentence, but (B) uses it and (C) uses they. Check for a singular-plural match.

In both cases, logically, the pronoun should refer to the plural noun sales (later in the sentence); in other words, the pronoun should be plural. Eliminate answer (B).

Note: if you say that it refers to the singular November in answer (B), then the comparison is faulty. Previous Novembers aren’t supposed to be compared with the month of November in general; they are supposed to be compared with this past November.

(2) Comparison: X compared with Y

When you see a comparison marker, make sure that the comparison is apples to apples.

(A) sales this past November… compared with sales in previous Novembers

(B) it [sales] is compared with previous Novembers

(C) they [sales] are compared with previous Novembers

(D) compared with previous Novembers, sales…this past November

(E) this past November’s sales, … compared with previous Novembers’ sales

Fix: Answers (B), (C), and (D) compare sales to previous Novembers. This is a faulty comparison. Answers (A) and (E) correctly compare sales from one period to sales from another period. Eliminate answers (B), (C), and (D).

(3) Meaning: so that

Answers (A), (B), and (C) all start with but; answers (D) and (E) start with so that. What’s the difference?

The sentence is trying to convey a surprising fact. It is already the case that November is typically a strong month for light truck sales. Surprisingly, this past November was even stronger than usual. The contrast word but can appropriately link these two sentence together: you already knew something was true, but it was even more true this past November!

The phrase so that conveys a cause-effect relationship: She studied hard so that she would get a good score on the test. This isn’t the right meaning for the official sentence; it isn’t the case that November is traditionally the strongest month so that (in order to cause) it would be even stronger this past November. Eliminate answers (D) and (E) for faulty meaning.

The Correct Answer

Correct answer (A) makes a valid comparison between sales this past November and sales in previous Novembers. Note that some people may dislike this choice because it can seem wordy; wordiness by itself is not a good enough reason to cross off an answer. Look for errors in grammar or meaning!
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Re: November is traditionally the strongest month for sales of light truck  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Dec 2017, 13:08
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November is traditionally the strongest month for sales of light trucks, but sales this past November, even when compared with sales in previous Novembers, accounted for a remarkably large share of total vehicle sales.

(A) but sales this past November, even when compared with sales in previous Novembers, -Correct

(B) but even when it is compared with previous Novembers, this past November’s sales -no referent for "it" -- "it" can't refer to plural sales

(C) but even when they are compared with previous Novembers, sales of light trucks this past November -ambiguous "they" -- does it refer to trucks or sales? Nevertheless, it would have been an invalid comparison

(D) so that compared with previous Novembers, sales of light trucks this past November -no referent for "that" --"that" can't refer to plural sales

(E) so that this past November’s sales, even compared with previous Novembers’ sales, -We need to show contrast so we need "but"
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Re: November is traditionally the strongest month for sales of light truck &nbs [#permalink] 26 Dec 2017, 13:08
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