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The normative model of strategic decision-making suggests that

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Re: The normative model of strategic decision-making suggests that  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Oct 2017, 13:12
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CristianJuarez wrote:
Hi mikemcgarry

Could you please explain me the modifier in choice D? conditions and, using the set of objective criteria derived from these analyses, decide

Why can we say with certainty that it modifies executives? In this case, the ING modifier is not showing a result of a previous clause and is not touching executives (as when we say something like: "using the set of objective criteria derived from these analyses, executives blah blah blah").

Regards,
Cristián

Dear CristianJuarez,

I'm happy to respond. :-) I see that Shraddha already responded. I will add a few more thoughts.

First of all, it's good to learn the proper names. What you are calling an "ING modifier" is called a participle. Precision in language supports precision in thought.

Participles are unique in that they can function either as a noun modifier or as a verb/clause modifier. Only noun-modifiers obey the Touch Rule: with a few well-defined exceptions, noun modifiers must "touch" the noun they modifier. The Touch Rule governs noun modifiers only: it is entirely irrelevant to verb modifiers. Verb modifiers are much more free in their placement, as long as there's no ambiguity.

Noun modifier are adjectival phrases & clauses, answering "adjective questions": which one? what kind?

Verb modifiers are adverbial phrases and clauses, answering "adverb questions": when? where? how? in what way?

In this sentence, the participial phrase "using the set of objective criteria derived from these analyses" answers a "how?" question, so it's an adverbial phrase, a verb modifier.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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New post 20 Aug 2018, 07:49
daagh wrote:
One essential feature of parallelism is that in compound sentences, which use connecters such as and, or, but etc, if the subject of the first part is also the subject of the second part, then we can omit the subject in the second part. (Executives in this case)

e.g.: Tom went to London and he stayed for one month. Here ther is no need to repeat the pronoun he; It is in fact considered redundant.

Inflation stayed high before the central bank raised the interest rate but (inflation / it) dropped significantly soon after. We can drop the subject of the second part.


Sir, what is the difference between ',and' ( in A &B) and 'and,(in C,D&E). Can i take these as splits

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New post 23 Jun 2019, 02:00
Hi VeritasKarishma and GMATNinja
Could you please explain how in option D "using the set of objective criteria derived from these analyses, decide" is not modifying the verb, but modifying the subject("executives) in an unsaid way?
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New post 24 Jun 2019, 02:10
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dreamofbest2020 wrote:
Hi VeritasKarishma and GMATNinja
Could you please explain how in option D "using the set of objective criteria derived from these analyses, decide" is not modifying the verb, but modifying the subject("executives) in an unsaid way?


The structure of the sentence is this:

X suggests that executives examine ... and decide ...

it is the same as

X suggests that executives examine ... and (executives) decide ...
"Executives" is the subject for both verbs.

"using the set of objective ... " is a modifier that tells you HOW. How should the executives decide? Using a set of ...
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New post 24 Jun 2019, 08:30
Can someone explain why (B) is wrong? Would it be a correct answer if there is "that" between "and" and "they"? Thanks!
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New post 24 Jun 2019, 17:27
hammypancakey wrote:
Can someone explain why (B) is wrong? Would it be a correct answer if there is "that" between "and" and "they"? Thanks!
Option B uses these analysis.

... the set of objective criteria derived from these analysis...

We clearly don't want to use these with a singular noun (analysis).
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New post 29 Jul 2019, 06:11
(A) conditions, and in using the set of objective criteria they derive from these analyses, can decide - wrong "in using"

(B) conditions, and they use the set of objective criteria derived from these analyses in deciding - they is redundant here, only executive is enough.

(C) conditions and, in using the set of objective criteria derived from these analyses, deciding - wrong "in using"

(D) conditions and, using the set of objective criteria derived from these analyses, decide - Correct, ( "using...." phrase modify executive decision)

(E) conditions and, in their use of the set of objective criteria they derive from these analyses, they decide - wrong "in using"
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New post 19 Sep 2019, 00:57
mikemcgarry wrote:
bkpolymers1617 wrote:
mikemcgarry: Dear Mike, can you please throw in some expertise why option B is wrong. I understand that option D is correct, and it is an easy pick. But, I am not able to find a strong reason to eliminate B. I knocked it off because it uses the phrase "use X in deciding Y", which means that X plays an indirect part in the process of Y AND if you use the phrase" use X to decide y", which means that X plays a direct role to decide about Y.

2. Another problem with B is that it makes the 2 clauses independent, while the two clauses have a connection between them. (clearly evident in D)

Are these reasons correct? Can you let me know please? Thanks always

Dear bkpolymers1617,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

Choice (B) is grammatically and idiomatically correct, but it is not the best answer. The phrase "use X in deciding" and "use X to decide" are virtually identical in meaning: I disagree with your analysis of that difference.

Choice (B) is not the best answer because it's rhetorically inferior. It's clunky. The two independent clauses are grammatically correct, but why have two clauses with the extra pronoun subject? Choice (D) presents a much more elegant construction.

Does this make sense?
Mike :-)


So, Concision is the only reason why B is wrong. correct ?
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Re: The normative model of strategic decision-making suggests that   [#permalink] 19 Sep 2019, 00:57

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