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A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more cof  [#permalink]

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A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more coffee these doctors drank, the more they had a likelihood of coronary disease.


(A) more they had a likelihood of coronary disease

(B) more was their likelihood of having coronary disease

(C) more they would have a likelihood to have coronary disease

(D) greater was their likelihood of having coronary disease

(E) greater was coronary disease likely


The Official Guide for GMAT Review 2017

Practice Question
Question No.: SC 677
Page: 683

Coffee and Coronary Disease

(A) Modifier / Meaning (more)

(B) Modifier / Meaning (more); Meaning (have a likelihood to have)

(C) Modifier / Meaning (more)

(D) CORRECT

(E) Modifier / Meaning (greater was disease likely)


First glance

The choices start with one of two options: more or greater. Both words are modifiers indicating quantity, but they are used differently. Think about the meaning of the sentence as you read it.

Issues

(1) Modifier / Meaning: more

More and greater are both used to compare quantities. Consider these examples:

Vanessa has studied more than you. (correct)

Vanessa has studied greater than you. (incorrect)

The more you study, the greater your chances of success on the GMAT. (correct)

The greater you study, the more your chances of success on the GMAT. (incorrect)

Why are the incorrect options incorrect? In the first sentence (studied more), the distinction is based on quantity; perhaps Vanessa has studied for four hours and you have studied for only two. In the second sentence (studied greater), the distinction is not based on number. Perhaps Vanessa has studied more effectively than you have? The meaning is unclear, so that’s not a great sentence.

In the third sentence (the more you study), you are changing your chances of success based on the amount that you study. If you don’t study as much, your chances aren’t as good, but if you do study more, then you increase your chances—they are greater than they would have been.

The fourth sentence, though, doesn’t say that your chances increase. It says that your chances are more. You could give yourself more chances to succeed by, for example, taking the test multiple times—but that’s not what this sentence is trying to convey.

In the question, the sentence is trying to convey that, if the doctors drink more coffee, then their chances of having coronary disease increase. The proper form, then, is the more coffee [they] drank, the greater their chances (or likelihood) of having coronary disease.

In general, use the modifier greater, not the modifier more, to pair with the word likelihood. Eliminate choices (A), (B), and (C).

(2) Meaning: have a likelihood to have

The wording have a likelihood to have is redundant. The two instances of have are conveying the same meaning. Eliminate choice (C).

(3) Modifier / Meaning: greater was disease likely

What was actually greater? The disease itself is not greater; rather, the likelihood of having the disease was greater. The wording in choice (E), though, changes the word likelihood to the word likely. You can say that something is more likely to happen, but it’s not acceptable to say that something is greater likely to happen. Eliminate choice (E).

The Correct Answer

Correct answer (D) uses the accepted form the more coffee they drink, the greater was their likelihood. (You could also use the following form: The more you study, the greater your likelihood of success.)

Originally posted by LithiumIon on 13 Jun 2015, 18:32.
Last edited by Bunuel on 14 Dec 2018, 04:21, edited 1 time in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
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Re: A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more cof  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Apr 2016, 11:18
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After going through various suggestions by GMAT experts at Magoosh and Manhattan, I could arrive at the following conclusion:

The positive....comparative...superlative forms of certain adjectives of quantity are as follows:

set 1. many...more...most
set 2. much...more....most
set 3. great...greater...greatest

While set 1 (many...more...most) is used for countable nouns, set 2 (much...more....most) and set 3 (great...greater...greatest) are used for uncountable nouns.

Now there could be 2 types of uncountable nouns
type a. Quantity word / numbers themselves (e.g. price, volume, weight, probability etc.) are uncountable.
type b. Other uncountable nouns (honesty, poverty, etc as you mentioned)

The set 2 (much...more....most) is used for type b (other uncountable nouns) uncountable nouns.
The set 3 ( great...greater...greatest) is used for type a (Quantity word / numbers) uncountable nouns.

Therefore we see that "more" can be used for (i) countable nouns and (ii) uncountable nouns that are not quantity words/ numbers.
"Greater" can be used for (iii) uncountable nouns that are quantity words/ numbers.
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Re: A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more cof  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jun 2015, 00:12
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LithiumIon wrote:
2016 GMAT Official Guide, Question 10, Pg. 675

A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more coffee these doctors drank, the more they had a likelihood of coronary disease.

(A) more they had a likelihood of coronary disease
(B) more was their likelihood of having coronary disease
(C) more they would have a likelihood to have coronary disease
(D) greater was their likelihood of having coronary disease
(E) greater was coronary disease likely



Let's look at the structure here-

"the more coffee these doctors drank, more they had a likelihood of coronary disease

As the second part of the structure refers to 'likelihood', we need 'greater'. 'greater' is used when the noun is a number. For example: percentage, rate, likelihood, distance and population.

Also, 'likelihood' means 'the probability of a specified outcome'. Thus, it's imprecise to say they had a likelihood/probability of coronary disease. The correct usage should be "likelihood of having coronary disease'.

E goes out as it distorts the meaning. 'likelihood' was greater, NOT the disease.

This leaves us with D.


Happy Prepping! :D

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Re: A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more cof  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Sep 2015, 07:13
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"the more coffee these doctors drank, the more they had a likelihood of coronary disease

we can eliminate A because of improper past perfect tense.
(C) the more coffee these doctors drank, the more they would have a likelihood to have coronary disease
first part is in past tense, the conditional + present perfect tense they would have a likelihood........correct me if I'm wrong
(E) greater was coronary disease likely...............terrible construction

left options
(B) more was their likelihood of having coronary disease
(D) greater was their likelihood of having coronary disease

Quote:
'likelihood' was greater, NOT the disease. As the second part of the structure refers to 'likelihood', we need 'greater'. 'greater' is used when the noun is a number. For example: percentage, rate, likelihood, distance and population.

Also, 'likelihood' means 'the probability of a specified outcome'. Thus, it's imprecise to say they had a likelihood/probability of coronary disease. The correct usage should be "likelihood of having coronary disease'.

Dolly your argument seems good. However I cant understand why we cant use more for greater?
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New post 14 Sep 2015, 10:34
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indicates means probably, conditional.
in option C they would have conditional used is redundant.

here more the coffee noun used . likelihood is noun.

in opiton E no noun is there , likely adjective is used.

more coffee the doctors drank is a phrase when you compare we have to use a phrase.

In option A clause is used . Moreover, they had past perfect is used.

Now we left with B and D, both more and greater are comparative adjectives.

now more is used for additional , greater is used for larger importance such as colossal, gigantic.

here chances of having coronary disease. so option B wins.

Likelihood of is idiomatic, likelihood to is unidiomatic..


so option B wins.
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Re: A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more cof  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Sep 2015, 06:05
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DollySharma wrote:
LithiumIon wrote:
2016 GMAT Official Guide, Question 10, Pg. 675

A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more coffee these doctors drank, the more they had a likelihood of coronary disease.

(A) more they had a likelihood of coronary disease
(B) more was their likelihood of having coronary disease
(C) more they would have a likelihood to have coronary disease
(D) greater was their likelihood of having coronary disease
(E) greater was coronary disease likely



Let's look at the structure here-

"the more coffee these doctors drank, more they had a likelihood of coronary disease

As the second part of the structure refers to 'likelihood', we need 'greater'. 'greater' is used when the noun is a number. For example: percentage, rate, likelihood, distance and population.

Also, 'likelihood' means 'the probability of a specified outcome'. Thus, it's imprecise to say they had a likelihood/probability of coronary disease. The correct usage should be "likelihood of having coronary disease'.

E goes out as it distorts the meaning. 'likelihood' was greater, NOT the disease.

This leaves us with D.


Happy Prepping! :D

Dolly Sharma



Although your answer is correct, some of your explanations are not accurate based on Manhattan GMAT book. GREATER is actually used for uncountable things, NUMEROUS or MORE NUMEROUS is used for countable items. Here "likelihood" is not countable. The likelihood of having coronary disease is higher for those who drink certain amount of coffee.

Pls check the MGMAT Sentence correction book, pg. 200. for greater details
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After searching more about greater vs. more...I found the below explanation in Magoosh we site. And I am sorry DollySharma for quick judgement.

more vs. greater

When something countable increases, we use “more”

1) Holland has more tulips than does any other country in Western Europe.

Tulips are separate: you can count how many tulips you have.

When something uncountable increases, we also use also “more”

2) The US State of Georgia has more land than does the state of Pennsylvania.

3) It costs more to go to the ballgame than to go to the opera.

Land is an uncountable noun, and in #3, the implicit noun is “money”, which is also uncountable.

The question arises: when do we use “greater” rather than “more”? We use “greater” when the noun in question is a number. We can count the number of tulips, but a tulip itself is not a number. Some examples of nouns that are themselves numbers are: percent, interest rate, population, volume, distance, price, cost, and number.

4) The area of Georgia is greater than that of Pennsylvania.

5) The price of a trip to the ballgame is greater than the cost of a night at the opera.

6) Call option premia are greater when interest rates are higher.

(Notice, for certain economic quantities, we will use “higher” for an increase.) In general, things take “more” but numbers take “greater.” The “increasing” case is the easier of the two cases.
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Re: A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more cof  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 27 Sep 2015, 22:53
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My simple feeling is that when we use mass nouns or abstract nouns that are taken as in-disparate or inseparable, then we have to use ‘greater’. To wit

This year’s flood damage is greater than last year’s. --- One cannot count damage.
India has greater prosperity than many neighbors.
Disappointment is greater in adolescence than in adulthood.

Isn’t likelihood something that cannot be counted as one likelihood or two likelihoods?

Therefore ‘greater’ is the more appropriate word in the context.
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Originally posted by daagh on 27 Sep 2015, 07:48.
Last edited by daagh on 27 Sep 2015, 22:53, edited 1 time in total.
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New post 18 Nov 2015, 08:59
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Hello dear colleagues..) I picked the right answer, but it was just a guess, it just looked better for me, but here is an explanation for More VS Greater from a GMAT Expert:

the following rule will work in the vast majority of cases:
* if you are dealing with a word that literally describes a numerical quantity (number, rate, height, length, volume, population, etc.), then you should use “greater”.
The population of Colombia is greater than that of Argentina --> correct
The population of Colombia is more than that of Argentina --> incorrect

* if you are dealing with a word that describes some abstract characteristic of something (power, influence, effect, etc.), then you can use “a/an + greater” or "more" (the latter WITHOUT 'a/an').
John's father has had a greater influence on the development of his personality than has his mother. --> correct
The Prime Minister has more power than the King, even though the latter is the country's titular leader. --> correct

* if you are dealing with a word that describes things that you can actually count, then you should use “more”.
I have more sports jerseys than anyone else I know --> correct

* if you are dealing with an uncountable noun that is NOT a numerical quantity, then you should use “more”.
there is more furniture in this store than in the other one --> correct
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Re: A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more cof  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 08 Nov 2018, 17:16
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Guys,

Give the concrete explanation than justifying the correct answer choice. OG 's explanation may be suitable for this question only. But it is still not clear when to use greater Vs More.

I see in MGMAT SC 6th EDITION, page 69. GREAT can be used for uncountable modifiers. But at the same time, it is also said that more, most, enough and all work with both countable ( plural ) and uncountable ( singular ) nouns. When the choices are between greater and more atleast for me is still a puzzle, as I still think "likelihood" as uncountable modifier and both more & greater can be used.


Here is what I think, on "likelihood"

A. likelihood is not a numerical quantity like, length, rate, population, number etc.. [ I dont know whether I need to include probability to justify it as a number ]
greater can be used here " The population of Colombia is greater than that of Argentina "
Here more is preferred for likelihood.

B. likelihood is like nouns that are uncountable like patience, influence, courage, water [ can be measurable not countable ], greed, anger, money.
The Etruscans had raised an army in which each soldier had selected another, and they fought with greater forces, and greater courage, than ever before.
Courtesy : Romes Italian Wars, page 214.
Here also we used greater. So in both A and B we are using greater.
Here greater is preferred for likelihood.

I am not a expert here taking snail steps to catch up the clarity. Expert comments are needed

Originally posted by dharan on 04 Mar 2016, 07:46.
Last edited by bb on 08 Nov 2018, 17:16, edited 2 times in total.
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New post 23 Jul 2016, 00:33
Thanks for correcting that mbaprep2016 , though i'm more interested in the validity of the clause parallelism.

Here's the updated sentence -
"Studies indicate that not only are GMAT Club students smarter than other students but they also score significantly higher than do the rest"
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New post 23 Jul 2016, 03:20
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abhishek1912 wrote:
Thanks for correcting that mbaprep2016 , though i'm more interested in the validity of the clause parallelism.

Here's the updated sentence -
"Studies indicate that not only are GMAT Club students smarter than other students but they also score significantly higher than do the rest"


I don't see any not only...(clause1)...but also...(clause 2)... parallelism problem in this sentence (even though in the second clause the subject "they" comes in between "but" and "also").
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New post 11 Jan 2017, 09:38
More on option B vs greater in option d
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Agunner wrote:
More on option B vs greater in option d


When a quantifiable parameter (e.g., price, area, volume, density, speed, probability, likelihood etc.) is referred, "greater" is used. Hence, option D is better than option B.
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New post 02 Apr 2017, 23:34
This question confused me quite some bit. I have kind of made sense about why greater is a better choice than more but I can't understand why "had a likelihood" or "likelihood to have" in A and C respectively, is wrong. Please help.
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SS18, if you're being really strict and literal with the meaning here, (A) and (C) are both just a little bit illogical.

In (C), the clearest issue is that the verb tense is a little bit off. "... the more coffee the doctors drank, the more they would have a likelihood to have coronary disease." One problem is "would have" -- the phrase conditional, which doesn't make much sense here. We're looking at facts of a study: "the more x occurred, the more y occurred". Since these are facts, it wouldn't make sense to say: "the more x occurred, the more y would have occurred." There's simply no need to make the second part of the phrase conditional.

In (A), it doesn't make much sense to say "the more they had a likelihood." It makes sense to talk about the degree to which something is likely to occur: "a higher likelihood" or "a greater likelihood." But this is subtly different: (A) is saying "the more they had a likelihood" -- which seems to express "likelihood" as a binary thing, that you either have or you don't -- so now (A) seems to say that the more the physicians drank, the higher the odds of having a likelihood. And that doesn't make much sense. (C) suffers from the same problem, too.

I hope this helps!
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New post 18 May 2017, 18:51
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LithiumIon wrote:
The Official Guide for GMAT Review 2017

Practice Question
Question No.: SC 677
Page: 683

A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more coffee these doctors drank, the more they had a likelihood of coronary disease.

(A) more they had a likelihood of coronary disease
(B) more was their likelihood of having coronary disease
(C) more they would have a likelihood to have coronary disease
(D) greater was their likelihood of having coronary disease
(E) greater was coronary disease likely


You have to know that likelihood is "greater" or "lesser" and not "more" or "less" to solve it.

For instance, we can't say "the likelihood is more"

We have to say "the likelihood is greater", it has to be a numerical comparison.

First glance

The choices start with one of two options: more or greater. Both words are modifiers indicating quantity, but they are used differently. Think about the meaning of the sentence as you read it.

Issues

(1) Modifier / Meaning: more

More and greater are both used to compare quantities. Consider these examples:

Vanessa has studied more than you. (correct)

Vanessa has studied greater than you. (incorrect)

The more you study, the greater your chances of success on the GMAT. (correct)

The greater you study, the more your chances of success on the GMAT. (incorrect)

Why are the incorrect options incorrect? In the first sentence (studied more), the distinction is based on quantity; perhaps Vanessa has studied for four hours and you have studied for only two. In the second sentence (studied greater), the distinction is not based on number. Perhaps Vanessa has studied more effectively than you have? The meaning is unclear, so that’s not a great sentence.

In the third sentence (the more you study), you are changing your chances of success based on the amount that you study. If you don’t study as much, your chances aren’t as good, but if you do study more, then you increase your chances—they are greater than they would have been.

The fourth sentence, though, doesn’t say that your chances increase. It says that your chances are more. You could give yourself more chances to succeed by, for example, taking the test multiple times—but that’s not what this sentence is trying to convey.

In the question, the sentence is trying to convey that, if the doctors drink more coffee, then their chances of having coronary disease increase. The proper form, then, is the more coffee [they] drank, the greater their chances (or likelihood) of having coronary disease.

In general, use the modifier greater, not the modifier more, to pair with the word likelihood. Eliminate choices (A), (B), and (C).

(2) Meaning: have a likelihood to have

The wording have a likelihood to have is redundant. The two instances of have are conveying the same meaning. Eliminate choice (C).

(3) Modifier / Meaning: greater was disease likely

What was actually greater? The disease itself is not greater; rather, the likelihood of having the disease was greater. The wording in choice (E), though, changes the word likelihood to the word likely. You can say that something is more likely to happen, but it’s not acceptable to say that something is greater likely to happen. Eliminate choice (E).

The Correct Answer

Correct answer (D) uses the accepted form the more coffee they drink, the greater was their likelihood. (You could also use the following form: The more you study, the greater your likelihood of success.)
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Re: A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more cof  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jun 2017, 02:27
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If we compare first few words of answer choices, we see a split between ‘more’ and ‘greater’. If we read the sentence, we have ’more coffee….’, correct idiom is ‘the more the X, the greater the Y’. Eliminate A, B and C. We need greater.
In option E, ‘the greater coronary disease is not parallel to ‘the more coffee these doctors ….’. Eliminate E.
Hence D is the correct answer.
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New post 29 Jul 2017, 13:10
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A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more coffee these doctors drank, the more they had a likelihood of coronary disease.

(A) more they had a likelihood of coronary disease
(B) more was their likelihood of having coronary disease
(C) more they would have a likelihood to have coronary disease
(D) greater was their likelihood of having coronary disease
(E) greater was coronary disease likely

This is an interesting question!

I would like to jot down what I have understood based on my knowledge.

more ===> used for countable nouns and uncountable nouns that are not quantity nouns/words

greater ==> used for uncountable nouns that are quantity nouns/words

Considering above points, we have the noun "likelihood" (uncountable noun) which means "probability" (quantity noun), we should be using the word "greater" here for comparison purposes.


Hence, Option A, B and C are out (Though there are other errors in A and C which I will not write as GMAT Ninja has explained it in great detail)

We are left with option D and E

Option E has multiple errors and such as it is un-idiomatic and uses an adjective "greater" to describe an adverb "likely" which is ungrammatical

We are now only left with D after POE.

Hence, Answer is D

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Re: A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more cof  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Nov 2017, 11:06
ydmuley wrote:
A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more coffee these doctors drank, the more they had a likelihood of coronary disease.

(A) more they had a likelihood of coronary disease
(B) more was their likelihood of having coronary disease
(C) more they would have a likelihood to have coronary disease
(D) greater was their likelihood of having coronary disease
(E) greater was coronary disease likely

This is an interesting question!

I would like to jot down what I have understood based on my knowledge.

more ===> used for countable nouns and uncountable nouns that are not quantity nouns/words

greater ==> used for uncountable nouns that are quantity nouns/words

Considering above points, we have the noun "likelihood" (uncountable noun) which means "probability" (quantity noun), we should be using the word "greater" here for comparison purposes.


Hence, Option A, B and C are out (Though there are other errors in A and C which I will not write as GMAT Ninja has explained it in great detail)

We are left with option D and E

Option E has multiple errors and such as it is un-idiomatic and uses an adjective "greater" to describe an adverb "likely" which is ungrammatical

We are now only left with D after POE.

Hence, Answer is D

Did you like the answer? Hit Kudos :good


Hi,
can we eliminate option B on the below basis-
The idiom in B is as follows:
The more X, the more Y.
In this idiom, the more cannot be followed by a verb- The more coffee these doctors drank, the more was their likelihood
The comparison in B is not grammatically viable.
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Re: A long-term study of some 1,000 physicians indicates that the more cof   [#permalink] 19 Nov 2017, 11:06

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